Illustration Isolation: Episode 32, Figure Drawing The Tuskegee Airmen

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Episode 30 Transcript:

This transcript is automated by Zoom and contains typos, misspellings, and may inaccurately reflect what was actually stated by the artist. We apologize for the inconvenience. 

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Open it up.

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Okay.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, everybody say, Hey, I got the grid setup, say you're all on camera.

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John English: Hi everybody.

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Tim Trabon: Hey, this

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John English: This is john and just to let her give everybody a little lay of the land here of course there's Timmy Raven, he is here, Terry Brown is here. Bill cobras here CF pain is here.

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John English: Bill Cole. This year again.

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John English: Yeah, sure. Again,

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Tim Trabon: We're gonna have a few more people joining us as the night goes on. I'm sure one or two of them have joined as a panelist.

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Tim Trabon: Or as an attendee as an attendee

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John English: Coming in.

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Tim Trabon: So,

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John English: What's going to happen.

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Tim Trabon: So tonight is a big night for a lot of reasons.

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Tim Trabon: But we have our first. This week we were at someone submitted a

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Tim Trabon: fan made theme song and

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Tim Trabon: We're fully embracing it. So,

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Tim Trabon: Please enjoy

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John English: Oh come, I need to feel the need to play Pong.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, exactly. So, um, yeah. So john take it away.

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John English: Okay, I will do. So I don't know if I'll take it away. But I will

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John English: I know it's going to come up, or I don't want it to. It always does.

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John English: All right, here we are with visit visual arts passage and a new logo, by the way. So we're we're supporting all kinds of goods tonight.

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John English: As always, visual arts passage is bringing

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John English: Bringing our, our open drawing night. Our illustration isolation night.

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John English: We had a great crew with us tonight. I think I introduced everybody wants. I'll be introducing them individually. We're doing going to be doing some few couple special things tonight, a little bit differently. But we're going to get drawing pretty quickly. Here's our

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John English: This is where we are in our, in our, our open drawing night.

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John English: I wanted to give one more. Thank you to art house and Richard Allen for letting this uses work for the last month. He was incredibly kind to do that. He's a wonderful photographer and just

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John English: Excellent work so

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, to be honest. Did you just forget to remove it.

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John English: No, no. I know.

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John English: You can see I have a new slide.

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Tim Trabon: Okay, right.

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John English: Patient for the next we're going to be featuring underdogs and

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John English: Rate, we put this out to the people that continually draw with us and rainbow Nia, of all people responded almost immediately with the Tuskegee airmen and So tonight we're going to be drawing reference from

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John English: For obviously our photo reference will be from actual Tuskegee Tuskegee airmen and we're going to give you a little background with each of them. Terry Brown is here with us tonight ex director extraordinary from the society of illustrators in New York that is going to

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John English: A few minutes of explanation. It's something that hit home with him that he's pulling some things full circle for us, which I think will be

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John English: Entertaining in between poses.

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John English: And it's draw time Ray is going to draw first tonight. You can access your the the reference at visual arts passage com forward slash photos in between poses, please post your work. Please post on Instagram and Facebook. So I think we're ready to go.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, we should be ready. The

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Tim Trabon: The photos are in order. So it is left to right, those that that's the order that will be doing the referencing. And yeah, so the first photo john it's up

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John English: Fantastic. Okay, I'll stop sharing and let them, let them. People started growing and introduce ray

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Raymond Bonilla: Well, you know, they john you shouldn't be surprised because it took an underdog to know, you know, to grab the underdog theme.

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All time

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John English: So you are you saying you're an underdog.

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Raymond Bonilla: In this case, yes, especially if I'm, you know, opening up for Chris Payne, you know that. That's never a good thing I do want to thank you for

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Raymond Bonilla: putting me in that situation, yet again.

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John English: Well, it's better than following Chris Payne

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Raymond Bonilla: That it says true

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Raymond Bonilla: That is true.

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Tim Trabon: And and john kind of as I think we're we're doing this first post. Did you read planning to kind of

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Tim Trabon: Because I think there's probably a few people in the audience who maybe are joining us for the first time, or are from an outside of the states that maybe don't know the story. Were you guys planning to crack that open source code.

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John English: We're gonna, we're gonna just we're gonna. This is this poses of airman and Edward Glee and he was a

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John English: One of the, one of the first

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John English: Part of the night Calvary in and graduated from

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John English: You know, actually, I think I'm going to

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John English: Most importantly, Terry. You're going to get a kick out of this. He graduated from the University of Kansas and then went on and

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John English: Went in 1941 became a Tuskegee airmen and I'm gonna let Terry, I don't want to get too far into the story about the Tuskegee airmen, I'll just, we'll just kind of give highlights of of Edward I know that that Ray has a few things to say about them maybe

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John English: And and

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John English: First, first thing that I'm going to ask Grey is, why did you choose that photo.

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Raymond Bonilla: I think I chose the photo because it was just had a really nice sense of light and shadow on the face. There was a lot of

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, certainly a post photo but it, it just had

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Raymond Bonilla: You know,

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Raymond Bonilla: Kind of like this sort of classical

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Raymond Bonilla: layout of shapes and I just love the the

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Raymond Bonilla: The intertwining of like the the the the shapes of like the the helmet going into sort of the radio equipment and then you know the the jacket. The flight jacket. The, the parachute and then I just love like the shirt and tie underneath all of that, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: And I thought, it's just really sort of classy photo and I, that's the way I always think of the Tuskegee Airmen is it's like completely like the face of adversity like completely just the classiest

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Raymond Bonilla: Google pilots, you probably ever see. So that's

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that's why.

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John English: We pray without going too far. The, you know, this was the first African American pilots in our US military and they

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John English: I don't wanna. I don't want to take away any of Terry's thunder because he's got a much better explanation and then much more as

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Tim Trabon: John and I

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Tim Trabon: Yeah. To add contacts. JOHN AND I DON'T REALLY PUT TOGETHER book reports really well.

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Tim Trabon: This has been a really great learning experience for both of us because we both got to learn a lot.

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Tim Trabon: And this is it's an amazing subject to learn about

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John English: Absolutely. This is the and Edward Glee don't dedicated 33 years of his life to 30 plus years of his life to to the military and

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John English: Had a really an amazing life and experience the things that he, the things that he went through the things he dealt with the things that he

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John English: Accomplished he kept back when he, when he left the military. At the age of 60 he went to law school and graduated law school, so I think it's just a really interesting

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John English: You know, these are ultra competitive individuals.

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John English: Extreme x, you know, the extremist new imagine you know we joke all the time about taking chances as artists and these these are these guys were the real McCoy and Edward lived a huge life and I you know I i

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John English: With without again. I really don't want to step on Terry's toes.

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John English: About me let's

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Terry Brown: Go ahead and stop.

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John English: I will stop.

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Terry Brown: Stop.

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Yeah.

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John English: So let's talk about the artwork. What do you, what do you work at it tonight.

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Raymond Bonilla: So I'm working in Photoshop. I just a basic I'm going to work in in just black and white values and in grades.

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Raymond Bonilla: I'm still kind of

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Raymond Bonilla: Enjoying working like that and

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, just kind of blocking things in big, big shapes and whatnot and just trying to get an overall feel for things. And before I really start to get into sculpting kind of the light and shadow

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Raymond Bonilla: Throughout these things. I just want to say like, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: I think that the risk it most riskiest thing I ever did as an artist was maybe were like

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Raymond Bonilla: A nice shirt.

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Raymond Bonilla: To go into the studio with. So these guys are like, you know, superheroes.

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Raymond Bonilla: So it's it's it's so cool.

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John English: The riskiest thing I've ever done. As I sat in between Chris Payne and Gary Kelly.

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John English: Accidentally

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John English: Didn't realize what I had done.

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John English: The

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John English: Chris, say, you know, maybe you could chime in on this a little, little bit you know it's really fun going back and looking at the photography that's associated with this.

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John English: Because so much of it is shot. Well, it's all most of what we're looking at us in black and white. There was some color shots but

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John English: We're looking at great black and white photography and most of it and being in the airfield.

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John English: A lot of it is outside and directional with sunlight.

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John English: I know that you're a big fan of baseball photography. I mean, can you say a few words about that Chris

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C. F. Payne: Yeah, well, I mean they are using natural light, which normally is your best light.

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C. F. Payne: And, you know, these cameras, of course, that they were using back in those days, also with these lenses were just

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C. F. Payne: Spectacular. So I mean I betcha right now what we're looking at on our screen and our cell phones, wherever it is. I mean, what's amazing is you can blow this thing up.

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C. F. Payne: And and still get to see so much detail in this because it's all there. The lenses and the photographers that we're shooting this stuff. We're just total pros and

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C. F. Payne: You know, even as Ray said this has a bit of a pose quality to it. But there's such a sense of light and life to it that that really makes it a fun picture to draw

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C. F. Payne: I mean there's everything is in a shadow form shadow cast shadow

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C. F. Payne: Good lighting good composition, where the fuselage have a p 51 Mustang is coming down and crossing or his head as it's it's just really a nice composition

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C. F. Payne: That. Yeah. All you have to do is draw it, you know, it's just, that's it. This is so good. All you have to do is draw just don't mess it up.

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Terry Brown: You know, in the reality of the of the camera man that day at the Tuskegee airbase shooting 36 pilots and their planes and the ground staff and group shots.

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Terry Brown: shooting them one at a time. Then as groups.

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Terry Brown: No doubt as contact sheets. If anyone knows what those used to be imagine the amount of film that they went through that then had to be process.

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Terry Brown: In a mobile studio where they had to bring in their chemicals and create these contact sheets and then pick the pictures from there. That would be made into eight by 10

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Terry Brown: Prints for whatever use it was they were a important effort in the war, and they were moderately well supported at the beginning but it became a challenge when you get two more tanks and one less photographer that shows the tanks. So I think we're blessed to have

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Terry Brown: Really dedicated photographers

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Terry Brown: With limited equipment and limited support creating a quite a de Lucia images of them were to. And these are just, you just beautiful.

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C. F. Payne: Yeah, I mean, over the years, there have been some books, whether it's about the Tuskegee Airmen or the Memphis Belle or other well known divisions, because

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C. F. Payne: By this time, you know, the War Department was doing a pretty good job of documenting

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C. F. Payne: You know, they, you know, this documentation of the military figures has been going on since, you know, Matthew Brady and artists before that. And then you have the whole series of artists who actually go into the field and draw. So the fact that we've got good stuff.

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C. F. Payne: Is is more and more being realized as more and more of is being published

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C. F. Payne: And I think

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Terry Brown: If any of the students have an interest or in your prose to have an interest in that on the field in the action artists today. The Norman Rockwell Museum just had a seminar. I'm sure it's online, on their site.

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C. F. Payne: Right.

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Terry Brown: Nick. Are you awesome three other people, mostly women Marine Corps and the reality of being embedded in recent years in mostly in the Mideast outcome.

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C. F. Payne: You can probably speak. There was a PBS series, you probably can find it on YouTube. Also, on the world war two guys and that film was called a drew fire and

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C. F. Payne: You can probably find it on YouTube and watch. It's pretty fascinating program.

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Sure.

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Terry Brown: JOHN I think your, your, your students also maybe looking at this and not putting two and two together the Tuskegee is an Alabama.

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Terry Brown: Alabama was down south, it's, it's hot there, even today, this guy's got a leather jacket on heavy one shirt gloves tight fitting hat could be 85 degrees out there.

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Terry Brown: But that's what he's going to win and get

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John English: Up to the lucky.

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John English: Lucky, lucky if it's 85

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Terry Brown: Training to go up in an airplane where when you saw 10 12,000 feet high over Norway. It's going to be a little cold. So that's the reality of what he's wearing

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Terry Brown: His i i would think, part of your part of your imagery

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John English: Right.

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C. F. Payne: Oh yeah, they were talking about, you know, they had a program recently on PBS about the Memphis Belle and we're talking about those guys when they're flying up there at 20,000 feet. It's getting you know 40 below zero up there.

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Raymond Bonilla: Wow 40 below zero. Holy mackerel.

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C. F. Payne: Yeah, well, I mean I have to. If you've ever flown

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C. F. Payne: In when you flown recently and that or even not that recently, you can oftentimes your flight will have, you know, an information panel in front of you and you can still list the temperature

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C. F. Payne: And you'll see oftentimes it's 4050 degrees 60 degrees below zero, when you get up way up in the altitudes well over 20,000 feet. It gets damn cold fast right

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Raymond Bonilla: And so betting artists, is that, I mean, did that start in with the

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Raymond Bonilla: With World War One, or did that. I mean, where did that start with the first instance that I can think of is besides like repertory illustration of like like Winslow Homer doing stuff like the Civil War.

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Raymond Bonilla: Was

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, like Harvey done and a lot of the Brandywine artists going out there in the world war one and just covering their, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: Covering the war effort.

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Raymond Bonilla: Was that, was that kind of the first instance of it, or was that

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Raymond Bonilla: predated or

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Terry Brown: We're actually what you're saying is right about Winslow Homer during the Civil War, but he was on commission to Harper's Weekly, he was doing

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Raymond Bonilla: It.

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Terry Brown: For a purpose. It was a

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C. F. Payne: He was a

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Terry Brown: Journalist by the time you got to Remington during the Spanish American War. He was doing them for call your subscription nurse.

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Terry Brown: Yes. By the time you got to World War One Harvey done in that group. They were doing it for the military, just a document its role.

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Terry Brown: And during World War Two. They did document the role the beginning but then as I said three tanks one artists will take the three tanks.

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Terry Brown: And was like magazine that stepped up and said, We'll pay the RSS to go out and and give us what they see. There was very little in Korea, who was almost none in Vietnam.

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Terry Brown: As far as repertory but we're seeing more of it now, which is kind of kind of good for the military to get a different take an artistic cake on the mayhem.

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Raymond Bonilla: It's a crank revenue to just hear stories of of artists embedded in more like that. I mean, I know I've talked to the choir is about it and the stories that he tells me it's quite an incredible and

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Raymond Bonilla: You know I

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Raymond Bonilla: If there's so many crazy stories.

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Raymond Bonilla: Harvey done in like foxholes and just trying to trying to survive a you know bombardments and then from that to like

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Raymond Bonilla: John Singer Sargent

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Raymond Bonilla: Being in like the trenches and being

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Raymond Bonilla: Annoyed add gunfire around them. Because it, it must have been disturbing his ability to concentrate, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: Not, not a

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Raymond Bonilla: Different time, I guess, you know, in terms of

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, must have been sort of like, I don't know if it was like exciting for them. I'm sure like what we're wanting almost like you had a lot of like

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C. F. Payne: I like I said Ray, like I said, if you get a chance to try to find it on, see if it's available on YouTube.

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C. F. Payne: They drew fire.

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Raymond Bonilla: Major fire. Okay.

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C. F. Payne: That was name of the documentary film, and it's really quite powerful because just exactly what you're saying he charges had different takes on it, one artist was saying.

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C. F. Payne: Trying to actually draw and in combat was impossible he couldn't do it. He showed you what is sketch was and it was kind of like illegible whereas side, as I recall. Howard broke Howard Brody Terry's awesome Howard Brody stories.

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C. F. Payne: You know, he was like, No problem. No problem. Drawing and edit. So it's very

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Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I remember seeing Howard Brody's sketchbooks at the Academy of Art.

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Raymond Bonilla: I think it was Howard Brody

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Who

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Raymond Bonilla: Didn't need done it all the the sketch books and everything like that to a good amount of stuff to the Academy of Art in San Francisco. My thinking of someone else.

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Terry Brown: That sounds like how abroad. He was a San Francisco guy and

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Terry Brown: Being a courtroom artist.

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Terry Brown: The rest of his life, which made sense because he could take one look at somebody and Robin

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that's, I mean that's an incredible facility to be able to do that. And that wasn't just like

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Raymond Bonilla: Posing as people just in a tense hanging out, like, I mean, I mean the most like

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, sort of slice of life moments like in between.

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Raymond Bonilla: The craziness of like war and

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Raymond Bonilla: It takes that it's a, it's a, I think it's a we have to kind of want to be able to work at that type of clip in terms of speed with. I mean, it's a

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Raymond Bonilla: It's like a whole nother type of training to I mean

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C. F. Payne: When you listen to what these guys were telling their stories. Her Abby was one of the artists. I don't know whether he was alive at the time and they made that film, but it's it's it's really well worth watching.

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Raymond Bonilla: I've got it written written down off to the side here, I just put it on my phone. They drew fire.

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C. F. Payne: Yeah, I remember when I was working with Terry and society of illustrators is the museum chair. I was writing

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C. F. Payne: You see about trying to get a show of that art at the society. But again, working through governments and in trying to go through red tape just proved to be

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C. F. Payne: A mountain. I could not climb.

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John English: Right re explain why you just flipped it

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Raymond Bonilla: Oh, well, it's a great, that's a great question. JOHN I am not good enough to spot all of my errors and so regularly. So what I do is I flip it, so I can get a fresh view of things. So again, having a mirror in your studio and looking at your piece in reverse, along with the

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Raymond Bonilla: The, the reference and it just helps you, but my I gets tired and it's, I mean I especially these Thursdays, because it's just right after I teach and so

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Raymond Bonilla: I I'll flip it back and forth to kind of view things some artists, don't you know don't like doing that. They say, like, it looks good. One way should look good. The other way, but

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Raymond Bonilla: I I don't trust myself and I think that I would use that as an excuse. You know, it looks, you know, and so

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Raymond Bonilla: The excuse to cover up my bad drawing

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Raymond Bonilla: And so I'll, uh, I'll do this every so often, so I can get a nice sort of an accurate view of things.

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John English: You see it fresh and we evaluate what you're doing.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. And I'm always just looking trying to

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Raymond Bonilla: Look at it with that fresh analytical I some constantly comparing. In contrast, and with my I gets tired, it will do that less and less and kind of settle and I don't want to set on especially early on when I'm trying to set up this portrait.

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Raymond Bonilla: Because I want all of the major elements in place before I really start to get into sort of the detailed parts.

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Raymond Bonilla: If you know if I have time, but I know that if I get the major element, it'll look

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Raymond Bonilla: It'll look good. And that's why

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Terry Brown: Ray Ray asked me to two questions about if you had enough time to do this to a total finish to details, would you be focusing on them. Would you think they were important.

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Terry Brown: I'll draw your attention to his collar his shirt collar on the right hand side is we look at if someone would be Mr. Cheese left collar. There's some Alex stuff there.

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Terry Brown: If you know what, that's the rank of captain.

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Terry Brown: Says,

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Yeah.

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Terry Brown: Railroad tracks.

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Raymond Bonilla: Oh yeah, this stuff right here.

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Terry Brown: Yeah, this is an African American in 1943 and he's a captain.

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Terry Brown: He got. And then the other thing would you add, that and the other thing I hope I could say is, are you going to make sure that he is interpreted as an African American, for sure.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah, yeah, for sure.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that's this is just basically right now just setting up like major, major values that that's and and mostly like in the face. It's the values are kind of wrong.

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Raymond Bonilla: And I'm going to put a glaze over the whole thing. So I'm just getting the shapes at this point.

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Raymond Bonilla: In some of these other areas I'm gonna, I'm actually going to move this little this harness things just like and maybe around there. So I can actually concentrate on the captain's

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Raymond Bonilla: Thing right on his collar right here. I think that's a cool idea.

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Raymond Bonilla: Is why, this is why we need you.

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Raymond Bonilla: This is why we need to Terry

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Raymond Bonilla: I feel like I'm working for Geographic, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: The closest I'll ever get

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John English: Yeah, you know, instead of bombs going off, you have other artists are asking you in that. Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah tell

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John English: Me what to draw

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Terry Brown: Not are certain

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John English: Are not artists.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

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Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, no. It's been a long re

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Raymond Bonilla: Isn't it. Hey, what's up, he

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Raymond Bonilla: Was in like if you work for National Geographic, you get paired with like a researchers and and historians and whatnot, to make sure everything you're doing is like accurate.

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Raymond Bonilla: Anybody here work for geographic as I National Geographic, sorry.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, I was interviewed

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Tim Trabon: To get hired at National Geographic when I was in college and

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Tim Trabon: It was really exciting. And it was a I was in France at the time and I had a zoom meeting real zoom meeting for the interview.

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Dale Stephanos: 12 years ago, but what

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Tim Trabon: 12 years ago Nazi Nazi him. It was like Skype.

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Tim Trabon: Skype and it, uh, and it I the call dropped

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Tim Trabon: Halfway through and then I never heard from anyone from National Geographic

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Dale Stephanos: Drop.

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Tim Trabon: A pseudo yeah

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, it was just kind of like what, what, you know, like a, you know, trying to call back out, man. That was, that was a rough night.

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John English: Vivian should have just showed up and going to work for him and just just assumed that they

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Tim Trabon: That's how my dad.

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Don Kilpatrick III: I'm ready to go.

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Raymond Bonilla: You know,

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Tim Trabon: Ray I guess what I'm saying is

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Tim Trabon: I got, I probably got the closest to to possibly being able to answer your question.

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John English: John foster who's not here tonight he were

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Tim Trabon: Oh, JOHN. JOHN would have been

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Tim Trabon: Yeah. Well, he's not here, so I'm

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John English: Not here where she was.

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John English: But

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Don Kilpatrick III: I'm in

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John English: I'm glad that Dan Kilpatrick has also joined us. And so is Dale stuff on us.

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John English: Thank you for showing up, guys.

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Raymond Bonilla: Present will not be

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Raymond Bonilla: On the official role do the tardiness so

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Well,

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Don Kilpatrick III: You know Ray was talking about being paired up for National Geographic and visual arts passage teamed up with another artist harasses you so

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Don Kilpatrick III: My role tonight.

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Raymond Bonilla: We're the NASA geographic Google Drive live streams.

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Tim Trabon: We really try to make like a create a kind of a Mercurial

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Tim Trabon: Kind of a Mercurial relationship between two artists and we

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Break.

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John English: Time or just went off, but

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Raymond Bonilla: I did.

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John English: Another minute or two. I'm really enjoying watching what you're doing here.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I might. I definitely will need a minute or two, because i'm gonna i'm actually I was actually thinking about playing around with the idea of pulling a john and working at least another sitting on this thing and

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Raymond Bonilla: One of those

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John English: Posters not here tonight, but

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Tim Trabon: No, I think that's a great

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Raymond Bonilla: Idea right

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Tim Trabon: I mean at least two more see

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Tim Trabon: I couldn't resist.

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John English: Next, Next time you put all this together and you everybody and time it and do answer the text as they come through out the, the, what while you're doing

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Raymond Bonilla: A lot more time not inviting Don and Dale, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

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John English: So I would ask a question.

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John English: To God and Dale. Dale I I chose all the reference tonight and Dale, can you stay to the end. Yeah, because I think I'll have you draw last there's a

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John English: It's, it's very much a portrait. I mean just and I think it would be perfect for you.

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John English: And done

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Don Kilpatrick III: You would go third. Wow. Okay. Cool. Thanks.

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John English: You have to, you have the fun of following Chris Payne

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Dale Stephanos: Thank you.

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Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, what is

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John English: If either of you don't want to do it will cope is is always here. So if you if you have to leave or whatever.

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Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, I'm good for good.

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Don Kilpatrick III: Reason.

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Tim Trabon: And then john I got we can do some logistics in front of everybody.

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Tim Trabon: I have a

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Tim Trabon: I have a short little presentation for the next image. And I know Terry wants to speak.

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John English: Yeah, but we're gonna get we're gonna know.

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Tim Trabon: Where should we do this.

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John English: I think we should go with Terry first

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Tim Trabon: Perfect.

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John English: And so I would I would

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Tim Trabon: Prefer that

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John English: You. Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: Excuse my, my. Yeah, that that all I can get help me with a lot of contacts.

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John English: plus and plus

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Tim Trabon: We need content plus tech Tina's he's talking about

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Terry Brown: The good ones.

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John English: So I'm still I'm holding out here for another minute or so.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, I do have another question.

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Tim Trabon: For dawn and Dale, what, what were you guys doing that was so important.

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Don Kilpatrick III: Well, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: The audience.

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Raymond Bonilla: It gave me the audience.

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Tim Trabon: Can I like, I don't open

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John English: question for all of you. Yeah, they were trying to stay married

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Dale Stephanos: Is what. Yeah, there you go. Very good.

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Tim Trabon: You guys talking about this is easy.

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Don Kilpatrick III: Oh yeah, since

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John English: Like the guy who lives next to his house on a trailer

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Yeah.

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John English: Or at least

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Tim Trabon: I

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Tim Trabon: Turned on my video. I am in a home.

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Tim Trabon: I'm only occasionally in the

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Tim Trabon: Trailer outside my house.

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Raymond Bonilla: I was thinking about that I really missed the trailer to me, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: I just

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Tim Trabon: You know what, you know what shut down the illustration isolation scamp trailer was Mike I hired some lot of people to do my yard and the long guy just I was my fault. He was just like I said, Either that cable, just like out

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, it's for my I run internet to my scale.

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Tim Trabon: Here's like all right.

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John English: Hey Ray. This is looking great by the way.

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Amazing.

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Raymond Bonilla: Thanks.

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John English: Yeah, I love, I love the, you know, putting the tone over it and going back. I mean, that's, you know, that's mechanically. That's what, that's what I always tried to do you know physically. It's mechanically, the same thing.

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Raymond Bonilla: Got exactly

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John English: I got to be working out of something that's a little darker.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I've always you know I flip back and forth between this but I always have enjoyed being able to make my

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Raymond Bonilla: Create my my lights out of like a wash of of some sort. I always found that to be really helpful to me.

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John English: The glades solidify the shape so much in the you know the all of it silhouette of it's much more much more immediate

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Raymond Bonilla: Right. And I could use the under you know the undertone to kind of work, work. My, my values and I like the idea of like reductive like subtracting things to subtracting the values to get that. And I always love like lift out and things like that.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, so it just creates such a wonderful surface yeah set of marks.

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John English: It's easy to it's easy to control the values for sure.

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John English: Totally groups them together.

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Raymond Bonilla: I asked us

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Tim Trabon: Sorry to interrupt. I thought this is great. JJ Jackson. We have a couple of Air Force families.

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John English: Who want

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Tim Trabon: Erica, the house and Erica Tuskegee

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Tim Trabon: Eric is tuning in from Alabama Air Force family.

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Tim Trabon: Mom and JJ Jackson, son of a black Air Force that

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Tim Trabon: Too. It's just, it's just it is it's terrific just

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Tim Trabon: Fantastic love having like some it's so cool to have so many different people from, you know, that we can do something like this and have people in the room who are directly connected

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John English: Okay, so, so right. Are you going to continue to work on this through the expos

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I'm gonna make this look really nice. Yeah, okay.

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John English: We're also going to

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John English: Terry's going to talk for a few minutes now. So let's, let's, let's do that. Let's go. You keep keep working and listening to terrorism, so I am going to share my screen.

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John English: And

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John English: Just want to say a quick word for those of you don't that don't know, Terry. Terry for

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John English: About a quarter of a century was

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The

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John English: Director of the New York Society of illustrators, and has tremendous, tremendous knowledge of the illustration industry.

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John English: Somebody who's taught with me number of times but he's got a lot of personal interaction with illustrators. And it's kind of interesting because

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John English: It was the illustrators, the ones that I think a lot of people in this room were chasing you know that was kind of his era there. I mean, you were there for the Westport group and you, you saw so many of the

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John English: Contemporary illustrators that I was looking at when when I was when I was learning at school and had personal interaction with them and

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John English: You got some good stories. So this is what

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Terry Brown: I was fortunate

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John English: This is everybody, this is Terry brown treat them well because he knows his stuff and I'm really thankful that he's here tonight.

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Terry Brown: Thank you jack

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Terry Brown: And thanks for a couple of seconds, Timmy john and especially Ray for mentioning the Tuskegee Airmen as underdogs when I saw Tuskegee airmen, it reminded me very much of a dear friend when I saw Tuskegee Airmen

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Terry Brown: I thought of the era that you all know about World War Two. And my friend came out of that.

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Terry Brown: Tuskegee huskies and southern Alabama. It says grow as you can get. You can imagine the way it was in 1880

372
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Terry Brown: When the locals said they would vote for the white senator if you would start a land grant school in their town. So we said, Sure. Give me your vote. You can add the land.

373
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Terry Brown: With no buildings on it. They hired Booker T. Washington to be the first superintendent to create the school as work study if you went to this school. And of course, you were African American. If you did, you built the buildings that was part of your study was to learn how to build a building.

374
00:38:27.030 --> 00:38:32.520
Terry Brown: I think that's about as grassroots and institution as you can have it was not meant to be high end

375
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Terry Brown: Compete with Yale and Harvard, it was meant to to teach locals how to teach the next generation of their African American brothers, sisters, how to be smart, intelligent work in the system. Slide john

376
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Terry Brown: By World War Two. The army had a bit of a pickle. They had a number of black soldiers.

377
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Terry Brown: Naval personnel and air personnel who wanted to go the next step in the Army needed them to go the next step can be trained as

378
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Terry Brown: High level officers we trained as actual airman can happen with the white soldiers over there started separate place. Where did they go to, they went to eight different universities around the

379
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Terry Brown: Country historically black universities who had airfields nearby and said, if we bring some teachers in of course they were wanting

380
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Terry Brown: To teach you how to fly and gives you the training you need. You can form units and you can operate in the theaters of your couple in ASIA. ASIA mostly Pacific mostly your and one of them was the 330 second Fighter Group.

381
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Terry Brown: They were a fighter bomber Squadron they fought in Europe in the segregated armed forces, they were noticed that says key airman because they trained at Tuskegee airbase

382
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Terry Brown: There was one person who you can go to Slide john thanks. This is the guy I know this has really grown by the growth broken Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

383
00:40:01.500 --> 00:40:06.450
Terry Brown: At the age of 20 he enlisted in the service for World War Two.

384
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Terry Brown: As a teenager he said he paid 50 cents to a barnstorming pilot to take them up in a farm for tri motor airplane.

385
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Terry Brown: Double winged went maybe 10 miles an hour tops, but he got up there racing racing as soon as I got up there. I knew absolutely that was what I wanted to do the rest of my life.

386
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Terry Brown: He goes into the service. He's a sergeant. He goes, it's appointed Tuskegee, it says officer badge he learns how to be a pilot.

387
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Terry Brown: Is first assignment was with the 318th airbase Squadron commission is a flight officer that squad, who was then transferred to Italy in one of the interviews that Roy good for the Military Air Force military side he said this.

388
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Terry Brown: A locale. He later described as the only place in we should, quote, sit down in a restaurant and be treated like a customer.

389
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Terry Brown: It's a strange thing he said back in those days that reunion 40 years later, like, mine's a little foggy, but I remember it here. I was a commissioned officer in the United States Army

390
00:41:15.270 --> 00:41:25.530
Terry Brown: And officer and a gentleman as at work and in the States. I was still forced to sit in the back of the bus.

391
00:41:26.730 --> 00:41:29.370
Terry Brown: That's an that's an underdog game. It's like, yeah.

392
00:41:31.140 --> 00:41:38.970
Terry Brown: What do you got out of the service. You went to Pratt Institute Brooklyn. He studied the University of Florida in Italy for a year now. He had been in Italy as a

393
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Terry Brown: As a pilot. Perhaps he knew some people there love to go back to Italy and that kind of affected the way he treated arc down the road.

394
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Terry Brown: Became an art director, one of these jobs was with Avon paperbacks now if you work for a paperback company back then. We're talking about the late 50s into the early 60s, you might Commission.

395
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Terry Brown: 500 covers in a year 10 a week you're given a lot of jobs illustrators, they got to know Roy, they have to like Roy. He probably is a very decent art director, I will talk about that. You can go on.

396
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Terry Brown: On Google Images or whatever. You can find a lot of this is pictures there is commercial art, but he was not drinking it comes to the society of illustrators in 1963 and applies for membership.

397
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Terry Brown: As an artist membership.

398
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Terry Brown: And he was elected.

399
00:42:28.590 --> 00:42:34.470
Terry Brown: Now you probably think that society that old fuddy Duddy white men's club. If you were a woman. If you were black.

400
00:42:34.980 --> 00:42:42.360
Terry Brown: Asian my quads, Dad. If you understand if you were a professional Illustrator. This what she did. You were welcome yes even back then.

401
00:42:42.840 --> 00:42:54.660
Terry Brown: I think that's to their credit, you could not turn a Roy away. He got very involved in the annual book he actually designed a couple of them. He was always a juror and the annual he designed a couple of the annual show posters.

402
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Terry Brown: Slide john but one of the things we're really like is he, he's a frequent participant in the Air Force art program.

403
00:43:02.580 --> 00:43:16.140
Terry Brown: Now this was something that was started in May 15 with the help of the Air Force. They wanted to document what they were doing, we supplied the artists that is the society. Those supplied the artist and to date over 5000 original works.

404
00:43:17.310 --> 00:43:26.310
Terry Brown: Had been donated to the Air Force art collection through that program, the Air Force got this great art document the hardware their people.

405
00:43:27.270 --> 00:43:34.350
Terry Brown: And their mission, the artists got the privilege of going on those assignments flying in the latest equipment.

406
00:43:35.190 --> 00:43:39.690
Terry Brown: They would come back, D. They would never show once a year, and the gallery there absolutely giddy with stories.

407
00:43:40.290 --> 00:43:51.810
Terry Brown: I was a grunt and I was a captain to in the army, but that's a lot too much longer story. You could just tell the excitement. They had of being part of that of that military outreach of

408
00:43:52.890 --> 00:43:56.430
Terry Brown: An artist depicting what the military was doing

409
00:43:58.830 --> 00:43:59.310
Terry Brown: My job.

410
00:44:00.480 --> 00:44:09.600
Terry Brown: This is the kind of imagery that we created for the Air Force our program here the art exhibit on the brick walls of the society. It's like

411
00:44:11.790 --> 00:44:29.190
Terry Brown: exhibited in the Air Force Art Gallery in the Pentagon. As you can see the scale of Roy's work. You could see the intensity of the faces. He wanted to document the people more than the F whatever of a plane was that was something that he saw as being the most important part

412
00:44:30.510 --> 00:44:30.900
It's like

413
00:44:32.850 --> 00:44:48.900
Terry Brown: Or really struck me about royal grown every year he would host a an annual luncheon at the Society for he's Tuskegee buddies at first. There were 12 and it got down to eight and finding 9292 there were only three

414
00:44:50.040 --> 00:44:51.480
Terry Brown: These guys would sit down.

415
00:44:52.860 --> 00:44:55.260
Terry Brown: Let's sit down. They were officers, they would, gentlemen.

416
00:44:57.600 --> 00:45:06.450
Terry Brown: They would dignified. They were well spoken well dressed successful sophisticated. They were charming. They were humble.

417
00:45:07.590 --> 00:45:14.910
Terry Brown: And they made a strong the lasting impression on me. And anyone who's around it. I just thought this was great to have this group once a year.

418
00:45:15.600 --> 00:45:27.420
Terry Brown: See us see you as illustrators your environment and how seriously you took your work to hear them. Be proud of the lies. They live having survived as

419
00:45:29.310 --> 00:45:36.450
Terry Brown: underdogs in a really rough environment to come back to an even refer environment. After the war, and be successful.

420
00:45:37.590 --> 00:45:45.660
Terry Brown: Town slight one of them of course was a hell of an artist naturally grown. This isn't a good book to okay book apart is the history. There's a lot more on video.

421
00:45:46.140 --> 00:46:02.730
Terry Brown: But I thought it was great that they featured Roy's art as the as the centerpiece of the story of the Tuskegee heroes Roy, he ended his career at Rutgers University. He was designing all their alumni publications in New Jersey. He lived most of his life in New Jersey.

422
00:46:03.840 --> 00:46:14.970
Terry Brown: His wife Esther was a sweet very quiet woman, the wonderful voice. She would come to events within she would sit by yourself. I always went over to say hello.

423
00:46:15.600 --> 00:46:29.100
Terry Brown: She had a voice a little bit of an accident. It was hard to handle sometimes she was from Iceland, how the elbows to met, I don't know, but you can go online to have a great family, one of his grandsons is now a pretty successful artist.

424
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Terry Brown: One day in 1993 Why wasn't feeling well. He took a nap on the couch in the living room of their home and Android never woke up, he was 72 years old.

425
00:46:43.860 --> 00:46:44.280
Terry Brown: Slide

426
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Terry Brown: Rather grown was the underdog.

427
00:46:47.700 --> 00:46:54.690
Terry Brown: He had a great laugh, and I know he would be laughing right now and be very proud that his fellow

428
00:46:55.770 --> 00:47:03.720
Terry Brown: Tuskegee Airmen are being remembered tonight are being remembered in artwork, keep it up gang.

429
00:47:04.020 --> 00:47:07.890
John English: Thanks for the third. Thank you so much. That was terrific really well done.

430
00:47:07.950 --> 00:47:08.730
Bill Koeb: That was really

431
00:47:09.060 --> 00:47:09.900
Terry Brown: Like, my pleasure.

432
00:47:09.930 --> 00:47:10.560
Tim Trabon: Thank you so much.

433
00:47:11.340 --> 00:47:11.910
Don Kilpatrick III: Amazing.

434
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Dale Stephanos: It was great.

435
00:47:14.070 --> 00:47:15.120
Terry Brown: Look them up online.

436
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John English: Fantastic. Thank you so much.

437
00:47:20.730 --> 00:47:22.500
John English: Kimmy. Your follow that.

438
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Tim Trabon: I was, I was actually thinking maybe

439
00:47:27.150 --> 00:47:27.450
John English: Just

440
00:47:27.510 --> 00:47:30.570
Tim Trabon: I'll just send everybody a link to the sources I used

441
00:47:31.710 --> 00:47:46.320
Tim Trabon: Come on, come on, we want. Yeah. Yeah, I know. So I, you know, was really excited. Ray, thank you so much for coming up with this and I, I'll be the first to admit I actually had to do a lot of learning this week.

442
00:47:47.490 --> 00:47:49.860
Tim Trabon: And got to read a ton of stories.

443
00:47:51.030 --> 00:48:03.000
Tim Trabon: And hear some amazing stories and john and I have been we have like a Slack channel that we've just been sharing back and forth different narratives that we found that, you know, these amazing stories that

444
00:48:05.070 --> 00:48:10.200
Tim Trabon: I had not heard that. That's more of just a reflection of like me.

445
00:48:11.280 --> 00:48:11.550
Tim Trabon: But

446
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Tim Trabon: But for the second image I found really amazing story that is the story of what is considered the

447
00:48:23.070 --> 00:48:30.180
Tim Trabon: Let me get this right. They were, they were considered the the first couple of the Tuskegee Airmen

448
00:48:31.350 --> 00:48:33.600
Tim Trabon: It's a very, very touching story about

449
00:48:34.980 --> 00:48:37.410
Tim Trabon: Let me pull up the slide, so I can get it going.

450
00:48:40.470 --> 00:48:41.970
John English: This is Herbert Eugene

451
00:48:43.320 --> 00:48:43.920
Yes.

452
00:48:45.690 --> 00:48:48.570
Tim Trabon: Terry's got me all nervous because he did such a great job.

453
00:48:51.090 --> 00:49:00.240
Tim Trabon: Our next. Our next. Our next energies. So, Herbert Carter and Mildred Mildred heavens Carter. They were

454
00:49:01.020 --> 00:49:01.710
Tim Trabon: They were the

455
00:49:01.950 --> 00:49:14.100
Tim Trabon: They were they became a couple during their training and at 18 Mildred was the first black pilot in Alabama. The first female black pilot. AND NOW ALABAMA.

456
00:49:14.610 --> 00:49:28.830
Tim Trabon: And they both met in the test piggies pesky civilian pilot training program and the major part of their courtship was that they would run de vous 3000 feet.

457
00:49:29.940 --> 00:49:30.720
Tim Trabon: Like mark.

458
00:49:30.780 --> 00:49:35.430
Tim Trabon: Which I thought was just so I don't know it makes the notebook look lame.

459
00:49:36.840 --> 00:49:40.560
Tim Trabon: Okay, I just, I thought that was so amazing. But, um,

460
00:49:41.670 --> 00:49:49.830
Tim Trabon: He was a among the original 33 Tuskegee pilots and eventually became Lieutenant Colonel and

461
00:49:51.090 --> 00:50:00.690
Tim Trabon: Be that for those of you who are joining us who maybe don't really know the significance of how how respected the Tuskegee were for doing their job.

462
00:50:02.340 --> 00:50:20.460
Tim Trabon: And doing so incredibly well with that US bombers were shot down at an alarming rates and fire fighter pilots typically protecting these bombers would peel off to engage and the aircraft and that that the bombers vulnerable to attack.

463
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Tim Trabon: And each of these bombers carry 1011 Merrick Americans are soldiers and it would be devastated devastated. A devastation to lose a bomber and the Tuskegee held formation and would stay

464
00:50:36.480 --> 00:50:53.340
Tim Trabon: would surround the bottom would stay information around the bomber and it it left it much less vulnerable and they were their planes were known as the Red Tails and they were if you were a on a bomber, there was always requested. We want Red Tails Red Tails.

465
00:50:54.570 --> 00:51:01.440
Tim Trabon: Basically following us into battle. They were the, the one, the one group that you could always trust.

466
00:51:02.910 --> 00:51:03.720
Tim Trabon: And so

467
00:51:04.980 --> 00:51:14.550
Tim Trabon: They their courtship back to kind of this relationship there. Let me see if I can get the slide working. So this is a photo of her as a young man.

468
00:51:18.120 --> 00:51:20.280
Tim Trabon: And so, Mildred was

469
00:51:21.660 --> 00:51:39.120
Tim Trabon: One of the first Tuskegee airmen, which included both of you were a Tuskegee Airmen that could also mean you were part of kind of the entire project. We didn't necessarily mean you're a techie pilot, but she was a pilot and

470
00:51:40.230 --> 00:51:48.750
Tim Trabon: Her first job was she bulldozed all the trees to make way for the airfield, which I thought was a while. And I'm just imagining

471
00:51:49.440 --> 00:52:02.100
Tim Trabon: My wife doing that. It's like an impossible, like I couldn't do that. I'm trying to imagine me doing that. It's an impossible task, but it's just said such an amazing thing to look back on and she

472
00:52:03.330 --> 00:52:08.790
Tim Trabon: She became the first female pilot to join the states Civil Air Patrol Squadron.

473
00:52:10.260 --> 00:52:28.620
Tim Trabon: And then being she did apply to become part of the wasp, which is the women Air Force service pilots and I think that this brings to light a lot of a true prejudice that existed in and was really denied solely based on race and gender.

474
00:52:30.480 --> 00:52:37.770
Tim Trabon: That being said, she continued to fly as an indie as a civilian, she continued to work with the Tuskegee and

475
00:52:38.280 --> 00:52:53.520
Tim Trabon: The Tuskegee airmen and it really was a her husband supported her through all this. And it was a, you know, part of their story was that that was that lack of recognition was a very troubling thing for a very long time.

476
00:52:54.540 --> 00:52:54.900
Tim Trabon: And

477
00:52:56.100 --> 00:52:59.160
Tim Trabon: One of the more amazing things about her story is that

478
00:53:01.680 --> 00:53:13.770
Tim Trabon: She, she just continued to fly. She continued to speak, but eventually she actually was recognized nearly 70 years after after her.

479
00:53:14.790 --> 00:53:16.770
Tim Trabon: Original application and was

480
00:53:17.850 --> 00:53:30.600
Tim Trabon: Given metal by the wasp organization as the first the first woman in history to fly America so her and her husband travel the world speaking for equality and

481
00:53:31.680 --> 00:53:33.420
Tim Trabon: On behalf the Tuskegee Airmen

482
00:53:35.190 --> 00:53:45.870
Tim Trabon: Up until late in their lives. They, they go, she passed away in 2011 and he passed away in 2012 but they both are just absolute

483
00:53:46.950 --> 00:53:48.120
Tim Trabon: Just trailblazers

484
00:53:49.140 --> 00:53:51.570
Tim Trabon: This is him as a older man.

485
00:53:53.520 --> 00:53:56.340
Tim Trabon: And one of the wilder things. Is she actually met

486
00:53:58.140 --> 00:53:59.880
Tim Trabon: She actually met

487
00:54:01.050 --> 00:54:03.150
Tim Trabon: It was a Eleanor Roosevelt.

488
00:54:04.950 --> 00:54:07.410
Tim Trabon: On because Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the

489
00:54:08.610 --> 00:54:23.580
Tim Trabon: Earlier supporters of the Tuskegee project and and she was, she was landing her plane upon the visit, and she just happened to be the pilot so on and Eleanor Roosevelt asked for her by name, so

490
00:54:24.660 --> 00:54:26.070
Tim Trabon: A really amazing story.

491
00:54:29.580 --> 00:54:34.590
Tim Trabon: And of course if you if you want to draw this image. Unfortunately for this evening.

492
00:54:36.510 --> 00:54:39.750
Tim Trabon: We were not that there weren't any photos at Notre

493
00:54:41.070 --> 00:54:42.930
Tim Trabon: We really wanted to have a photo of melted.

494
00:54:44.250 --> 00:54:57.660
Tim Trabon: And we'll be featuring Herbert, though, because we had photos john you had those gathered, but I just, I just thought that was such a great story. So thanks for listening. Thanks.

495
00:54:57.690 --> 00:54:58.350
John English: Tammy. Thank you.

496
00:54:58.380 --> 00:55:00.120
Tim Trabon: Sorry for stuttering there. Great.

497
00:55:00.390 --> 00:55:01.830
John English: Thank you. You did.

498
00:55:02.280 --> 00:55:03.270
Terry Brown: An underdog story.

499
00:55:03.330 --> 00:55:04.530
John English: For. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah.

500
00:55:06.030 --> 00:55:09.480
John English: So the second, the second photo is of

501
00:55:10.680 --> 00:55:12.780
John English: Of Herbert and

502
00:55:14.670 --> 00:55:17.670
John English: Chris is going to do the next posts.

503
00:55:20.010 --> 00:55:21.270
John English: You got the photo, Chris.

504
00:55:25.890 --> 00:55:33.990
C. F. Payne: Yeah, I've got it I'm gonna, like I said, I've always got my my my thing unmuted because I have my music going. So is this music too loud.

505
00:55:34.170 --> 00:55:35.040
John English: If I can't hear on

506
00:55:35.910 --> 00:55:36.540
John English: We can't hear it.

507
00:55:37.080 --> 00:55:40.500
C. F. Payne: Okay, well, okay, so this is the image right

508
00:55:45.120 --> 00:55:47.910
John English: Okay I can't see your camera, you got to turn your camera back on.

509
00:55:48.330 --> 00:55:49.410
C. F. Payne: My camera went off.

510
00:55:51.390 --> 00:55:52.350
Tim Trabon: Yeah, it looks like you came

511
00:55:52.620 --> 00:55:53.280
Tim Trabon: Here we go.

512
00:55:54.000 --> 00:55:58.170
C. F. Payne: Yep, that's one alright sorry if my no

513
00:55:59.130 --> 00:56:01.710
C. F. Payne: No, that's okay. Alrighty, so let's get rolling

514
00:56:01.950 --> 00:56:03.900
John English: Fire away. I just hit the clock.

515
00:56:10.590 --> 00:56:13.260
John English: So, this is this is Christmas second demo for the day.

516
00:56:14.700 --> 00:56:15.090
C. F. Payne: Yeah.

517
00:56:16.020 --> 00:56:18.720
John English: Explain what you did this morning. It was really it was terrific.

518
00:56:20.640 --> 00:56:25.110
John English: It was at your that that was kind of like your test run on Instagram Live right

519
00:56:25.290 --> 00:56:31.980
C. F. Payne: Yeah, I've tried to do this Instagram thing thing about Bob, you know, trying to understand this new technology stuff.

520
00:56:33.300 --> 00:56:33.720
C. F. Payne: And

521
00:56:34.860 --> 00:56:41.370
C. F. Payne: So I did a demo of this technique that I somewhat developed over the years.

522
00:56:43.020 --> 00:56:51.960
C. F. Payne: being influenced by Gary Kelly, but also trying to avoid using the sprays that I used to use for my old technique with the oil wash and so I'm

523
00:56:53.160 --> 00:56:55.770
C. F. Payne: Rolling acrylics over drawings like this.

524
00:56:57.360 --> 00:56:57.930
C. F. Payne: And

525
00:56:59.340 --> 00:57:03.270
C. F. Payne: I rolled the acrylics with this Ultra Matte Medium that creates a nice texture.

526
00:57:04.740 --> 00:57:15.270
C. F. Payne: And the texture then allows me to work with colored pencil and then pain and all kinds of other fun, fun stuff. And it's just, it's just a fun process to play around with.

527
00:57:16.980 --> 00:57:23.370
C. F. Payne: And so that was basically it. We just wanted to see if I could pull it off without looking too stupid.

528
00:57:24.360 --> 00:57:25.290
Bill Koeb: It was amazing.

529
00:57:25.680 --> 00:57:28.320
John English: You did great. Chris, I just wonderful.

530
00:57:28.830 --> 00:57:29.400
Dale Stephanos: That was great.

531
00:57:30.960 --> 00:57:39.060
C. F. Payne: It was it was a fun thing to try to do. And I guess. So what I want to follow up with and later on we'll be like doing something like this is just

532
00:57:39.630 --> 00:57:50.850
C. F. Payne: Talking about drawing because that particular process rely so much on the drawing and so many times, even after you show somebody what you've done.

533
00:57:51.480 --> 00:58:00.900
C. F. Payne: They have problems with it because they have problems with their drawing and you know it doesn't know drawing. Still, I always will believe will be the root.

534
00:58:01.470 --> 00:58:13.560
C. F. Payne: And the core of everything we do and whether we're working digitally or whether you're working. Traditionally, I don't know anything about the digital world other than it's a typewriter for me.

535
00:58:16.440 --> 00:58:19.680
C. F. Payne: But I try to draw as much as I can.

536
00:58:22.290 --> 00:58:23.040
John English: So Chris, I

537
00:58:24.240 --> 00:58:33.030
John English: I'm going to say something. And maybe you can react to it as I you know I think of you. I mean, you're you obviously painting, but I think of you as a draw.

538
00:58:35.040 --> 00:58:53.100
John English: Your a great image maker, you know, do a full fledged illustrations and paintings were there full color full value and it's it's much more than just drawing, but I think of you as a draw, you do. Well, number one, one of the best drivers. I've ever seen. And you

539
00:58:54.240 --> 00:58:58.440
John English: You establish a drawing, and you always hang on to it all the way through. Yeah.

540
00:58:58.470 --> 00:59:02.490
C. F. Payne: I mean, I mean, drawing is why I became an illustrator.

541
00:59:04.740 --> 00:59:08.040
C. F. Payne: It's part of doing this that I like most

542
00:59:10.410 --> 00:59:14.880
C. F. Payne: And so, as much as I can retain that part of it.

543
00:59:15.900 --> 00:59:17.400
C. F. Payne: I'm going to, I'm going to do so.

544
00:59:20.070 --> 00:59:32.550
C. F. Payne: And and you you guys were talking about, you know, I think, Ray was saying why he flips something because you know he wants to make sure get well you know when I don't flip and it's only because whatever MISTAKES ARE IN MY DRAWINGS

545
00:59:34.650 --> 00:59:40.230
C. F. Payne: If they're if it's a mistake. I guess the nice way of saying we'll call it patina know it just

546
00:59:41.310 --> 00:59:45.630
C. F. Payne: It just what's there. I mean, it's because you're icy. It's funny you know you

547
00:59:46.110 --> 00:59:54.750
C. F. Payne: I'm sure everybody here has experienced it where you draw make a drawing and you think you've crushed it and you've got it and you're still really proud of it and then

548
00:59:55.170 --> 01:00:11.940
C. F. Payne: A month later, you come across the top. Gone. Good lord. How did I miss that you know that's that's and you want to go fix that. Which is probably why I never hang any of my artwork in my home because I'm afraid all I'll see are the warts and I don't want to

549
01:00:12.960 --> 01:00:16.050
C. F. Payne: tear it off the wall and start painting on it all over again.

550
01:00:17.070 --> 01:00:22.680
C. F. Payne: So, I mean, I just I just tried to set up the shapes as best as I can see them.

551
01:00:23.850 --> 01:00:37.350
C. F. Payne: I mean, I look at this particular thing and I could just look at the outside of the left hand side of his job versus the right hand side of his job. You can just see that very distinctive change that takes place.

552
01:00:38.700 --> 01:00:45.510
C. F. Payne: Right in here, it comes down and then this comes across up this way here in this kind of

553
01:00:47.580 --> 01:00:58.680
C. F. Payne: So I want to get that shape that very distinctively there. If I were to be doing more of a caricature. I mean, I would probably play off of that, even more so, push it even more.

554
01:01:00.570 --> 01:01:02.820
C. F. Payne: But I'm not really doing that. I'm just drawing

555
01:01:03.750 --> 01:01:08.850
John English: Well Chris. If it makes you feel better, as I have a lot of your paintings hanging in my house.

556
01:01:09.570 --> 01:01:09.960
C. F. Payne: Yeah.

557
01:01:10.170 --> 01:01:15.540
John English: I love having my one of my favorite things. Some of my favorite stuff to look at. Love it.

558
01:01:16.740 --> 01:01:22.740
C. F. Payne: Like I think a couple of them were pretty successful pieces, as I recall that

559
01:01:23.430 --> 01:01:25.260
C. F. Payne: Killer. And I had a lot of fun with them.

560
01:01:26.400 --> 01:01:28.830
C. F. Payne: You know, in some ways, I think.

561
01:01:28.860 --> 01:01:29.370
C. F. Payne: Even your

562
01:01:29.520 --> 01:01:32.340
C. F. Payne: I think even your dad got a kick out of a one of them at least

563
01:01:32.670 --> 01:01:35.880
John English: You got a kick out of the one of him on the bench and he was traveling

564
01:01:36.360 --> 01:01:41.340
C. F. Payne: Oh, he did, did he, did he, okay. Gosh, I wonder, I was wondering if you ever got to see that DAG on thing.

565
01:01:41.550 --> 01:01:44.670
John English: Oh, absolutely. In fact, the

566
01:01:46.560 --> 01:01:48.360
John English: I retained possession of it.

567
01:01:50.430 --> 01:01:53.040
John English: But he had it at his house for quite a while.

568
01:01:55.200 --> 01:01:58.890
C. F. Payne: I just thought that was such a great photo I did. I just love that picture.

569
01:02:00.090 --> 01:02:04.650
John English: GREAT PHOTO great your interpretation of it was perfect is wonderful.

570
01:02:10.080 --> 01:02:20.940
C. F. Payne: Now, this, this, this is obviously a studio photo and in what's tough about studio photos is, you know, you can see how some of this.

571
01:02:21.630 --> 01:02:32.160
C. F. Payne: Lighting is washing out this whole side of his face, which is making you know we're going to have to be a little interpretive here and we're just going to have to

572
01:02:32.970 --> 01:02:45.240
C. F. Payne: Kind of trust our understanding, which is this is why we do a lot of the drawing as well because not every time a photograph, as all the image all the information you really need

573
01:02:46.260 --> 01:02:51.960
C. F. Payne: So you're going to have to kind of take some of this and and start working

574
01:02:53.100 --> 01:03:13.020
C. F. Payne: With this as best you can and at times, make some, you know, judgments and interpretation. So I kind of see this crease here in the way that lift comes here and this is coming, you know, obviously this lift. That's what this is indicating here is coming down, you can see that

575
01:03:15.450 --> 01:03:20.970
C. F. Payne: So we got a guesstimate where this lower lip was going to be coming back up into there.

576
01:03:22.650 --> 01:03:24.270
C. F. Payne: Is peels up this way.

577
01:03:25.650 --> 01:03:26.130
C. F. Payne: Here.

578
01:03:28.590 --> 01:03:39.870
C. F. Payne: And so you're going to have to do you have to make some interpretations, it looks like he's got a little bit of soul patch there or something there, because that looks like a whisker there although I didn't

579
01:03:45.000 --> 01:03:57.570
C. F. Payne: And this, this probably actually his job, probably does actually come more all the way around here and what you're saying here is the cast shadow of

580
01:03:58.890 --> 01:04:05.610
C. F. Payne: The head year that looks like it's coming out this way and sweeps back down. So

581
01:04:08.430 --> 01:04:10.680
C. F. Payne: I'll just go ahead and put that in there like that.

582
01:04:15.390 --> 01:04:20.340
C. F. Payne: I'm gonna make that I'm going to make that assumption. Let's put it that way. I don't know whether I'll get away with it, but

583
01:04:26.940 --> 01:04:36.750
Tim Trabon: Yeah. I forgot to mention on the topic of original artwork, we received three original felicities this week.

584
01:04:39.690 --> 01:04:40.350
Tim Trabon: We have

585
01:04:40.620 --> 01:04:41.670
Raymond Bonilla: Something called you

586
01:04:42.810 --> 01:04:53.310
Tim Trabon: Know, trying to we're trying to make sure they don't hear about this so well. Now, now they, she said. Such a nice letter to me and john. It was really nice.

587
01:04:54.360 --> 01:04:57.600
Tim Trabon: It was like a Tuesday morning I was all teary eyed

588
01:04:59.910 --> 01:05:00.480
Bill Koeb: floater

589
01:05:01.140 --> 01:05:01.560
Yeah.

590
01:05:02.670 --> 01:05:03.330
John English: Yeah, there's

591
01:05:05.340 --> 01:05:11.550
John English: It was it was a is a phenomenal letter and a really, really nice.

592
01:05:12.510 --> 01:05:13.590
Tim Trabon: Nice to work.

593
01:05:14.400 --> 01:05:15.510
John English: Work was common

594
01:05:15.810 --> 01:05:19.230
John English: But the really great explanation of

595
01:05:21.090 --> 01:05:27.630
John English: Why we do this every week. I mean, it really spelled it out worse. Thank you very much.

596
01:05:27.960 --> 01:05:37.050
Tim Trabon: Yeah, so everybody in the audience was Felicity, a big things because she bought she bought everybody like another six months of free drawing nights.

597
01:05:43.980 --> 01:05:46.050
Raymond Bonilla: Did on that, you know, real

598
01:05:46.350 --> 01:05:47.460
Tim Trabon: Tonight john and I were

599
01:05:47.520 --> 01:05:49.770
Tim Trabon: Yeah. JOHN AND I WERE JUST ABOUT TO CANCEL IT

600
01:05:51.930 --> 01:05:52.920
Raymond Bonilla: Do this forever.

601
01:05:53.370 --> 01:05:58.110
John English: Yeah, okay. I should have put this. There's one other little bit of news.

602
01:05:59.160 --> 01:06:00.810
John English: That new person in the world.

603
01:06:01.110 --> 01:06:03.000
Tim Trabon: Do we get permission for this.

604
01:06:03.060 --> 01:06:09.960
John English: And that is that is Leon love it. That's Ashley love. It's a little boy they have been

605
01:06:12.120 --> 01:06:13.380
Raymond Bonilla: Granted, Ashley.

606
01:06:13.470 --> 01:06:14.100
Awesome.

607
01:06:16.920 --> 01:06:17.550
John English: Terrific.

608
01:06:18.690 --> 01:06:19.380
Raymond Bonilla: Wow.

609
01:06:19.890 --> 01:06:20.400
Cool.

610
01:06:22.920 --> 01:06:25.980
Raymond Bonilla: Amazing. We're aren't uncle's guys this

611
01:06:27.120 --> 01:06:27.930
Dale Stephanos: is funny.

612
01:06:28.200 --> 01:06:30.150
Bill Koeb: We should show a photo. Oh, no.

613
01:06:31.770 --> 01:06:33.300
John English: I just showed my phone bill.

614
01:06:34.320 --> 01:06:36.570
Bill Koeb: So check it out later I'll

615
01:06:36.750 --> 01:06:38.880
John English: I'll share it with you. I'll share with the group.

616
01:06:42.180 --> 01:06:43.050
Dale Stephanos: When, when

617
01:06:45.660 --> 01:06:47.010
Dale Stephanos: When did she give birth.

618
01:06:47.850 --> 01:06:55.950
John English: I think it was. I'm not exactly sure be but I got her text, and I assume that that's not the first thing that she did.

619
01:06:59.130 --> 01:06:59.610
Bill Koeb: John

620
01:07:00.120 --> 01:07:00.900
Tim Trabon: John yeah

621
01:07:00.960 --> 01:07:04.560
Dale Stephanos: This is also this is also a cautionary tale. It's like if you

622
01:07:04.560 --> 01:07:07.770
Tim Trabon: Text me or john anything, it might come up

623
01:07:13.200 --> 01:07:14.700
Tim Trabon: We're just looking for content.

624
01:07:14.760 --> 01:07:16.020
Tim Trabon: Every week so

625
01:07:21.930 --> 01:07:24.030
Tim Trabon: Yeah yeah yeah

626
01:07:26.160 --> 01:07:27.870
John English: I thought we weren't gonna talk about that today.

627
01:07:27.870 --> 01:07:30.480
Tim Trabon: Yes, I didn't know that was that was on the table.

628
01:07:38.190 --> 01:07:39.990
Raymond Bonilla: I feel like Terry would have brought it up anyway.

629
01:07:42.300 --> 01:07:43.200
Dale Stephanos: Terry. Terry

630
01:07:47.730 --> 01:07:49.020
Dale Stephanos: Terry such a gossip.

631
01:07:49.500 --> 01:07:49.920
Yeah.

632
01:07:52.440 --> 01:07:54.000
Terry Brown: You got the goods. You gotta share

633
01:07:56.700 --> 01:07:59.640
Raymond Bonilla: I was I was waiting for, like, next slide. JOHN AND THEN THAT

634
01:08:02.730 --> 01:08:04.860
Tim Trabon: Next slide. Next slide. I like that.

635
01:08:09.360 --> 01:08:09.960
John English: Old school

636
01:08:10.020 --> 01:08:16.170
Raymond Bonilla: We made it. Where, yeah. Make sure this slide projection. This is not, you know, falling asleep or something like that, you know,

637
01:08:17.160 --> 01:08:18.930
John English: Good money keeps me on my toes.

638
01:08:19.230 --> 01:08:19.710
Yeah.

639
01:08:22.680 --> 01:08:24.870
Tim Trabon: JJ says thank you for not canceling

640
01:08:25.710 --> 01:08:29.940
Tim Trabon: I was joking, we didn't, we didn't have me to cancel it.

641
01:08:33.930 --> 01:08:34.380
Tim Trabon: Notice

642
01:08:34.470 --> 01:08:37.200
Tim Trabon: I didn't notice that when I went speaking

643
01:08:38.280 --> 01:08:45.360
Tim Trabon: During the this whole thing is usually very easy for me if I can rely on Don to give like a pity. LAUGH

644
01:08:46.860 --> 01:08:51.660
Tim Trabon: But, but, but when done when you're so quiet is hard.

645
01:08:53.100 --> 01:08:53.760
Don Kilpatrick III: I know I gotta

646
01:08:55.830 --> 01:08:56.610
Don Kilpatrick III: sweat a little bit

647
01:08:57.870 --> 01:09:00.450
Raymond Bonilla: This this show runs on your pity john you do

648
01:09:01.890 --> 01:09:02.400
Raymond Bonilla: Realize

649
01:09:04.590 --> 01:09:05.550
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, that's so funny.

650
01:09:10.170 --> 01:09:10.440
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

651
01:09:13.560 --> 01:09:19.920
Terry Brown: Here's a side comment on the stuff that Chris is trying to draw, making it look like it really looks in the photograph.

652
01:09:20.940 --> 01:09:29.070
Terry Brown: You can imagine that these Tuskegee airmen, we're not the first in line to get the latest in the best equipment.

653
01:09:29.640 --> 01:09:31.290
Terry Brown: From the Army Air Corps.

654
01:09:31.980 --> 01:09:38.670
Terry Brown: The planes. They flew which you were allowed to paint any way you want it as a group. So they decided to be different. They put the Red Tails.

655
01:09:39.210 --> 01:09:49.110
Terry Brown: They painted the tail, and he runs in the back, bright red. So people knew who they were in the air, because every plane because exactly the same. And what Chris is drawing about the

656
01:09:50.850 --> 01:10:03.420
Terry Brown: The shades and the leather helmet. Don't we know what it's supposed to do. But it's just shapes to you guys. If you draw and you gals with you draw. It's amazing. You can bet they didn't get the best equipment they got the hand me downs and made the most of it.

657
01:10:06.990 --> 01:10:07.470
Point.

658
01:10:10.740 --> 01:10:11.820
Raymond Bonilla: Do you know if they they

659
01:10:13.350 --> 01:10:17.700
Raymond Bonilla: JUST FLEW people to one Mustangs, or did they were they like given like the old

660
01:10:19.410 --> 01:10:20.280
Raymond Bonilla: Ones that like

661
01:10:21.780 --> 01:10:25.920
Raymond Bonilla: The old ones that P 40 sevens. The Flying Tigers planes.

662
01:10:27.180 --> 01:10:32.100
Terry Brown: I'll let I'll let you. I'll do the research on that on the math of what they flew

663
01:10:33.600 --> 01:10:47.340
Terry Brown: They would have a good planes. Why the time they got to Italy in 43 late 43. They were probably two steps behind what the Germans still had

664
01:10:47.910 --> 01:11:01.320
Terry Brown: By the time you got to mid to late 44 they were flying a next generation and they were perhaps two steps ahead of what the Germans had because the Germans, he was running out.

665
01:11:02.520 --> 01:11:09.990
Terry Brown: So they they had a challenge at the beginning to make the most of it. I think this, the story goes with them. They were in the most highly decorated units because

666
01:11:11.010 --> 01:11:26.100
Terry Brown: The generals New Year. We came, we ship the airplanes and look what they did with them. Imagine if we gave him the really good stuff. And then the b two bomber said we're sort of like the red guys flying around, if you don't mind. But that's, again, part of the underdogs

667
01:11:27.420 --> 01:11:30.720
Terry Brown: I don't know if any of you. Last week we talked about movies, which I thought was fascinating.

668
01:11:31.740 --> 01:11:40.920
Terry Brown: If you go back and look at World War two movies, the ones made then the ones made now you almost never see a successful

669
01:11:42.240 --> 01:11:44.100
Terry Brown: African American soldier.

670
01:11:45.120 --> 01:11:50.190
Terry Brown: They're not up there right next to john wayne who question the flag on iijima

671
01:11:51.450 --> 01:11:54.270
Terry Brown: They were starting to be there, towards the end because we're running out of

672
01:11:55.560 --> 01:12:08.190
Terry Brown: Others, but you have to think of the the roles when they were given. And then they succeeded. You know that the people above them who relied on the troops, you get the jobs and say, Yeah, give me a 330 second

673
01:12:08.850 --> 01:12:16.410
Terry Brown: Barbara group they get the job done. So I think when they were given the opportunity they rose to the occasion. That's what I guess an underdog supposed to do.

674
01:12:17.760 --> 01:12:20.490
Bill Koeb: That's the whole thing of having to work harder.

675
01:12:21.840 --> 01:12:24.060
Bill Koeb: Just to get the same recognition.

676
01:12:25.560 --> 01:12:26.970
Bill Koeb: Or even less recognitions

677
01:12:31.020 --> 01:12:33.090
Raymond Bonilla: We talking about me talking about the

678
01:12:33.780 --> 01:12:34.410
Bill Koeb: Until you do

679
01:12:35.970 --> 01:12:36.210
Bill Koeb: That

680
01:12:38.520 --> 01:12:39.930
Terry Brown: Great. I wish that rash.

681
01:12:44.220 --> 01:12:47.160
Tim Trabon: Say if you're part of the Facebook or I shared a

682
01:12:49.110 --> 01:13:03.390
Tim Trabon: Link to a documentary and we'll dig into it soon but highly recommend watching a documentary because it does an amazing job unpacking a lot of the topics and things we're talking about tonight.

683
01:13:05.460 --> 01:13:07.380
John English: Thank you, that was gonna ask you to do that.

684
01:13:16.470 --> 01:13:17.160
Tim Trabon: Also

685
01:13:18.690 --> 01:13:23.160
Tim Trabon: Those of you who have submitted ideas for other underdogs

686
01:13:25.470 --> 01:13:29.760
Tim Trabon: I tried to respond to some of them. We got a lot of submissions and

687
01:13:31.770 --> 01:13:34.680
Tim Trabon: Work. We're continuing this for the rest of the month, so

688
01:13:36.690 --> 01:13:49.890
Tim Trabon: We are going to be doing more underdogs, and I think it's a great topic, all I've been doing is it's all I did this week is just read really cool stories and then and then be like, What did I do today. You know, like

689
01:13:49.950 --> 01:13:51.930
Tim Trabon: Winter winter target.

690
01:13:52.980 --> 01:13:53.280
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

691
01:13:53.850 --> 01:13:56.070
Tim Trabon: Stephen Hawking, however.

692
01:13:58.410 --> 01:13:59.490
Tim Trabon: It was like yeah

693
01:14:00.480 --> 01:14:07.590
Tim Trabon: Yeah, there is an inflection point where you read so many inspiring stories. It's not inspiring. It's

694
01:14:08.730 --> 01:14:09.090
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

695
01:14:10.050 --> 01:14:11.130
Raymond Bonilla: You know this person only

696
01:14:11.130 --> 01:14:11.880
Tim Trabon: Oh my

697
01:14:11.910 --> 01:14:13.590
Tim Trabon: God, I think that Sri

698
01:14:13.590 --> 01:14:16.920
Raymond Bonilla: Out of the four their limbs. I mean, it's not that i mean

699
01:14:17.130 --> 01:14:17.580
It's, yeah.

700
01:14:20.040 --> 01:14:20.610
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

701
01:14:20.820 --> 01:14:24.090
Tim Trabon: Yeah, I know. It gets you an inflection point where you're like, wow, I am

702
01:14:28.110 --> 01:14:29.280
Tim Trabon: That material.

703
01:14:30.690 --> 01:14:31.230
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

704
01:14:32.280 --> 01:14:34.500
Terry Brown: Good, Chris. Did you ever taken care for short trip.

705
01:14:36.000 --> 01:14:46.890
C. F. Payne: No, never really. I mean, you know, I think there was opportunities from time to time. But, you know, with somebody. The other thing when you're teaching classes and doing

706
01:14:48.000 --> 01:14:57.600
C. F. Payne: You have your you only have so much you can can accomplish. And I mean, it's something I've thought about, you know, and it would be neat to try to do

707
01:14:58.230 --> 01:15:17.700
C. F. Payne: As I as I'm now getting a little older, and being able to say, I've done it. But, you know, right now, like cheese right now what with what's going on with trying to run a program john can attest to this, you know, just trying to run a program during this time period itself is fairly challenging

708
01:15:18.840 --> 01:15:19.620
C. F. Payne: And so

709
01:15:22.260 --> 01:15:23.640
John English: I really don't have any problems with it.

710
01:15:23.730 --> 01:15:24.600
Work. So it's pretty easy.

711
01:15:30.300 --> 01:15:31.800
John English: As lightning strikes me

712
01:15:32.940 --> 01:15:35.190
John English: Yeah I empathize with you, Chris, because

713
01:15:36.360 --> 01:15:38.370
John English: lot going on in the world is affecting everybody

714
01:15:38.880 --> 01:15:39.360
Yeah.

715
01:15:41.190 --> 01:15:42.540
C. F. Payne: So, you know, you just

716
01:15:42.570 --> 01:15:45.300
C. F. Payne: You have to kind of pick things and and so

717
01:15:46.470 --> 01:15:49.650
C. F. Payne: At the time, sort of, like, in some ways, the way

718
01:15:50.670 --> 01:16:02.040
C. F. Payne: When wife was asked, you know he didn't want to break away from his family. He had his other obligations. I mean, I have my family. It's time I was trying to raise and

719
01:16:03.480 --> 01:16:04.110
C. F. Payne: Teach

720
01:16:05.400 --> 01:16:07.230
C. F. Payne: At various schools that I taught

721
01:16:08.430 --> 01:16:09.270
C. F. Payne: You have to kind of

722
01:16:10.860 --> 01:16:11.100
C. F. Payne: Yeah.

723
01:16:12.600 --> 01:16:13.020
And

724
01:16:16.830 --> 01:16:20.850
C. F. Payne: I think the teaching has was something I'm so glad I did that because

725
01:16:22.440 --> 01:16:37.230
C. F. Payne: I mean, JOHN. JOHN talked about it the other day when we were growing knowing that, you know, at the last Society of illustrators. There was something like what, three of the gold medal three award winners were were

726
01:16:39.390 --> 01:16:41.130
C. F. Payne: People who went through the program.

727
01:16:42.180 --> 01:16:42.600
C. F. Payne: John

728
01:16:43.740 --> 01:16:54.990
C. F. Payne: Mark, those are and that's that's something you can save the great deal of pride and I've got a handful of artists who are out there working and doing some really great things and

729
01:16:56.160 --> 01:17:14.670
C. F. Payne: I've been lucky to do some nice jobs and all that. I appreciate that the work that I have the opportunity to do, but I think I the thing I feel best about our my students and seeing the success that they've had in their lives is more important to me.

730
01:17:16.620 --> 01:17:18.720
Bill Koeb: Yeah, I definitely agree with that.

731
01:17:19.860 --> 01:17:20.880
Don Kilpatrick III: I can relate with that.

732
01:17:21.900 --> 01:17:24.210
Don Kilpatrick III: Satisfaction in that real satisfaction.

733
01:17:24.510 --> 01:17:25.320
C. F. Payne: Well, I mean,

734
01:17:26.340 --> 01:17:40.200
C. F. Payne: You know what I tell the story that you one of the reasons why I do this is, there is an artist in Cincinnati by the name of LD Warren, who is a well respected political cartoonist for the Cincinnati Enquirer

735
01:17:41.220 --> 01:17:49.050
C. F. Payne: And for some reason, you know, my mom was trying to figure out what I, what am I going to do with this kid who wants to draw. She called the enquire

736
01:17:49.980 --> 01:18:02.490
C. F. Payne: And he was willing to sit down and talk with me about art and and what have you. And I distinctly remember him saying, the only reason why I'm doing this is because somebody did it for me.

737
01:18:03.960 --> 01:18:05.880
C. F. Payne: And those words have stayed with me.

738
01:18:09.900 --> 01:18:10.560
Don Kilpatrick III: That's awesome.

739
01:18:14.070 --> 01:18:18.210
Raymond Bonilla: I think everyone's got that type of story. I mean, I know I do it, I mean, yeah.

740
01:18:18.990 --> 01:18:19.440
Yeah.

741
01:18:20.790 --> 01:18:22.230
Bill Koeb: Let's turn it out great. Chris

742
01:18:23.760 --> 01:18:24.690
C. F. Payne: We're getting there.

743
01:18:25.680 --> 01:18:33.720
C. F. Payne: I think this, this, this, this little area here is a little bit. I mean, you can see it, but it's just, I'm not really seeing what I'm seeing.

744
01:18:33.930 --> 01:18:36.450
Bill Koeb: Right, it's hard to figure it yeah this is a hard one to draw

745
01:18:36.480 --> 01:18:37.920
Don Kilpatrick III: You know, hey,

746
01:18:38.490 --> 01:18:49.140
C. F. Payne: You know, you know, the jaw line is right here. And, you know, right, there's the cheekbone right there. And so this is going to come down here, but this is this is a little dicey right there. Yeah.

747
01:18:52.500 --> 01:18:54.840
Bill Koeb: I'm just now, I'm just drawing it based on your drawing and

748
01:18:57.060 --> 01:18:58.290
C. F. Payne: That will get you nowhere.

749
01:18:58.710 --> 01:18:59.820
Don Kilpatrick III: You know, move, move your hand.

750
01:19:01.890 --> 01:19:02.700
Bill Koeb: That's beautiful.

751
01:19:04.740 --> 01:19:08.130
Bill Koeb: I also love the Jackie one piece that you did today.

752
01:19:08.490 --> 01:19:09.990
C. F. Payne: Ah, what gluttony, Greg.

753
01:19:10.890 --> 01:19:16.740
Bill Koeb: It and that was such a different take on him from just

754
01:19:18.030 --> 01:19:23.850
Bill Koeb: You know, I think of his face as being kind of more squashed in and you really pulled around and stretched it out.

755
01:19:24.600 --> 01:19:38.310
C. F. Payne: Well, if you did that, from a pride movie from. I'm trying to think. I think that was Kansas City confidential and that would have been probably 1947 so that's pretty early in his career.

756
01:19:38.550 --> 01:19:39.360
Bill Koeb: Yeah, he's

757
01:19:39.390 --> 01:19:42.660
C. F. Payne: much thinner and gangly there.

758
01:19:43.410 --> 01:19:45.090
C. F. Payne: I mean, we mostly know him from

759
01:19:45.120 --> 01:19:47.460
C. F. Payne: You know the stuff he was doing in

760
01:19:48.870 --> 01:19:58.770
C. F. Payne: Some of the Spaghetti Westerns. Yeah. And the other bad guys. He always was like I said he was always playing bad guys. I mean, he was never going to be the guy that was going to get the girl.

761
01:20:00.600 --> 01:20:01.680
Bill Koeb: What I just did. When

762
01:20:02.730 --> 01:20:04.230
Bill Koeb: When you were putting his teeth in

763
01:20:04.530 --> 01:20:06.990
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that really started to look like him.

764
01:20:09.000 --> 01:20:11.760
C. F. Payne: And yeah I you know I just

765
01:20:12.780 --> 01:20:19.260
C. F. Payne: And all I did was quite, you know, I just took my cell phone was watching the movie snapped a few shots.

766
01:20:20.340 --> 01:20:21.870
C. F. Payne: And drew from it.

767
01:20:23.940 --> 01:20:24.750
C. F. Payne: It's a lot of fun.

768
01:20:26.460 --> 01:20:28.980
C. F. Payne: I've got some new shots I should just recently.

769
01:20:30.000 --> 01:20:34.050
C. F. Payne: I've been doing some I've got a couple of from the odd couple that I've been playing with

770
01:20:36.000 --> 01:20:36.450
Us today.

771
01:20:41.010 --> 01:20:45.450
Bill Koeb: What movie was that you did that had math. Our sitting at the bar with the other guys.

772
01:20:46.470 --> 01:20:47.670
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, so that

773
01:20:48.480 --> 01:20:49.590
C. F. Payne: It Walter Matthau

774
01:20:50.010 --> 01:20:54.300
C. F. Payne: Mm hmm them. So those guys playing poker. That was from the odd couple.

775
01:20:54.360 --> 01:20:55.560
Bill Koeb: That was from the odd couple. Okay.

776
01:20:55.920 --> 01:20:56.700
C. F. Payne: I've been playing

777
01:20:56.730 --> 01:21:07.410
C. F. Payne: Poker. I'll get I gotta get more of it done. I mean, it just, I haven't. I ran out of time. Yeah, there's so much there. I mean, Felix is standing behind them and then you've got

778
01:21:08.580 --> 01:21:11.820
C. F. Payne: Her bed almonds in it and john fielder

779
01:21:13.890 --> 01:21:17.310
Tim Trabon: Was Walter Matthau and gone fishing with Danny Glover

780
01:21:20.580 --> 01:21:20.910
C. F. Payne: I don't

781
01:21:22.890 --> 01:21:23.250
Don Kilpatrick III: Think

782
01:21:24.180 --> 01:21:26.250
Raymond Bonilla: He wasn't Dennis the mass to me. I think that's

783
01:21:31.620 --> 01:21:34.170
Tim Trabon: Very much for that. I appreciate that let them have it.

784
01:21:34.710 --> 01:21:36.330
Bill Koeb: You know, what is a good one too.

785
01:21:36.540 --> 01:21:38.820
Tim Trabon: Oh man, this is Teflon for me. Chris, you know,

786
01:21:39.090 --> 01:21:40.170
Tim Trabon: My feelings with watch

787
01:21:40.620 --> 01:21:41.280
Tim Trabon: That out

788
01:21:41.550 --> 01:21:43.350
Tim Trabon: And Walter Matthau digs

789
01:21:47.640 --> 01:21:49.590
Tim Trabon: Somebody I was thinking job Bashi

790
01:21:52.110 --> 01:21:53.010
Tim Trabon: Like the same

791
01:21:55.170 --> 01:21:56.880
C. F. Payne: Walter Matthau and Joe Pesci the

792
01:21:56.880 --> 01:22:04.800
Tim Trabon: Somebody just said, Somebody just corrected me so I'm going, we're going, based off a random person in the room and it sounds familiar.

793
01:22:05.850 --> 01:22:07.080
Tim Trabon: I'm pretty sure it was geocache

794
01:22:08.730 --> 01:22:10.680
Tim Trabon: Did you know, find Joe Pesci fact, did you know

795
01:22:12.600 --> 01:22:14.550
Tim Trabon: Did you know that he was filming.

796
01:22:16.200 --> 01:22:22.530
Tim Trabon: I, what is it home alone at the same time he was filming good fellas.

797
01:22:24.630 --> 01:22:28.290
Tim Trabon: Yeah, like one one set to the other.

798
01:22:28.860 --> 01:22:30.300
John English: That's that is interesting.

799
01:22:31.320 --> 01:22:32.880
Tim Trabon: How do you turn that switch off.

800
01:22:33.960 --> 01:22:34.800
Don Kilpatrick III: Of a breakdown

801
01:22:34.860 --> 01:22:35.790
Bill Koeb: And use you.

802
01:22:39.330 --> 01:22:40.440
Don Kilpatrick III: Hahaha, or

803
01:22:42.480 --> 01:22:42.900
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

804
01:22:43.080 --> 01:22:44.340
Dale Stephanos: That would have been a great

805
01:22:44.790 --> 01:22:48.690
Dale Stephanos: Mash up. Now if you just mixed up to the movies and

806
01:22:48.810 --> 01:22:49.590
Dale Stephanos: You put one

807
01:22:49.890 --> 01:22:50.490
One son.

808
01:22:52.140 --> 01:22:55.230
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, maybe they are the seeds playing the same character we just

809
01:22:55.290 --> 01:22:57.810
Tim Trabon: Yeah, it's all, it's all part of the same Scorsese

810
01:22:57.810 --> 01:22:58.650
Universe.

811
01:22:59.880 --> 01:23:00.870
Don Kilpatrick III: Put a face, you know,

812
01:23:02.940 --> 01:23:03.300
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

813
01:23:04.380 --> 01:23:06.870
Bill Koeb: Chris. Have you seen a guide for the married man.

814
01:23:08.100 --> 01:23:08.460
Don Kilpatrick III: No.

815
01:23:08.970 --> 01:23:12.450
Bill Koeb: With math. Oh, and I think it's Howard Morse and

816
01:23:12.690 --> 01:23:13.200
John English: I've seen it.

817
01:23:13.470 --> 01:23:15.240
C. F. Payne: Oh yeah, with anger Stevens.

818
01:23:15.270 --> 01:23:17.340
Bill Koeb: Yeah, Ingrid. Ingrid Stevens. Yeah.

819
01:23:17.610 --> 01:23:18.870
C. F. Payne: Oh, yes.

820
01:23:18.960 --> 01:23:19.440
And yeah.

821
01:23:20.910 --> 01:23:21.090
C. F. Payne: Yeah.

822
01:23:21.930 --> 01:23:24.330
C. F. Payne: Yeah, Walter. Yeah, that, that, that's a

823
01:23:25.680 --> 01:23:32.580
C. F. Payne: It's that sort of reminds me of one of the that's one of those 1960s that today's in today's world that movie doesn't play well.

824
01:23:32.700 --> 01:23:33.090
No.

825
01:23:34.290 --> 01:23:37.320
Bill Koeb: But it's got a lot of great characters in it, like, oh,

826
01:23:38.130 --> 01:23:40.650
C. F. Payne: That's like Jesse, how to murder your wife.

827
01:23:41.130 --> 01:23:41.790
Bill Koeb: Yes.

828
01:23:42.510 --> 01:23:45.780
C. F. Payne: You know that I'm telling you that, you know, what's his name.

829
01:23:46.950 --> 01:23:48.270
C. F. Payne: Make made off.

830
01:23:49.290 --> 01:23:59.610
C. F. Payne: The actor and you know plays the lawyer his lawyer of God. He is just too much and he's only been he was only in a couple movies, but he he steals the show for me.

831
01:24:01.050 --> 01:24:03.540
C. F. Payne: And of course, Terry Thomas was great.

832
01:24:05.010 --> 01:24:07.710
C. F. Payne: As our buzzer gone off yet we did

833
01:24:09.090 --> 01:24:09.600
C. F. Payne: Just did

834
01:24:10.320 --> 01:24:10.710
Yeah.

835
01:24:12.390 --> 01:24:14.190
John English: You want to draw another minute or two, you can

836
01:24:14.280 --> 01:24:21.930
C. F. Payne: Well, I mean, just, just want to get out a couple barks because it just, I need to get an A couple hot dark spots in here. Couple pops.

837
01:24:22.680 --> 01:24:31.200
Tim Trabon: Jonathan Kimball just chimed in and said it would have been so cool if George Pratt was here tonight, Jonathan. I'm so sorry.

838
01:24:33.690 --> 01:24:34.080
Tim Trabon: No.

839
01:24:34.350 --> 01:24:39.090
Tim Trabon: Yeah. What did we quit because it is. Yeah, I don't know. I don't know, a

840
01:24:41.130 --> 01:24:42.780
Tim Trabon: Lot of a projecting

841
01:24:45.960 --> 01:24:46.470
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

842
01:24:46.710 --> 01:24:48.570
Raymond Bonilla: Father's birthday know

843
01:24:49.080 --> 01:24:49.650
Terry Brown: If anybody

844
01:24:50.400 --> 01:24:51.870
Tim Trabon: We try to get them here. Yeah.

845
01:24:51.930 --> 01:25:00.330
Terry Brown: If anybody could describe the the equipment and the usage of it and the whole team and pesky he would have been able to do that.

846
01:25:01.860 --> 01:25:12.240
Terry Brown: There was a guy who lived in in Westport named Ed rebel, who was a good work a day Illustrator. He actually was a courtroom artistic to the Nuremberg trials.

847
01:25:12.660 --> 01:25:26.100
Terry Brown: And and had a collection of World War Two uniforms out in the studio. That was just the most amazing collection ever and people who would get paperbacks insights would go to Ed and say I ate. I need a

848
01:25:27.570 --> 01:25:35.790
Terry Brown: German sergeant in the in the Panthers tank officer and he would say, well which pants or the 30 seconds of the 48

849
01:25:36.570 --> 01:25:56.790
Terry Brown: And he would actually have both uniforms. Oh, you went to office. He had so many uniforms and him. That was his hobby and I hope those uniform that that up at a good museum because it was amazing and knowing what every single button men and bad judgment and insignia and and capitals bars.

850
01:25:57.810 --> 01:26:01.260
John English: Off. I think I know George Pratt well enough to say this.

851
01:26:01.800 --> 01:26:02.880
Tim Trabon: We would have been here till

852
01:26:02.940 --> 01:26:04.020
John English: Till now.

853
01:26:04.080 --> 01:26:06.990
Tim Trabon: 11, you know, he would have said this, he said.

854
01:26:07.080 --> 01:26:11.490
John English: Really, he was I'm a world where one guy, not a World War Two. True.

855
01:26:11.580 --> 01:26:12.270
Dale Stephanos: That's funny.

856
01:26:12.810 --> 01:26:14.190
Raymond Bonilla: And that's why it wasn't invited

857
01:26:15.870 --> 01:26:17.070
Raymond Bonilla: Responses like that.

858
01:26:17.310 --> 01:26:20.460
Tim Trabon: We thought that we felt like he wasn't qualified so

859
01:26:21.930 --> 01:26:23.250
Tim Trabon: World War one wrong.

860
01:26:25.080 --> 01:26:25.470
Right.

861
01:26:27.630 --> 01:26:29.580
John English: His stories were worldwide. One stores.

862
01:26:41.730 --> 01:26:52.350
Tim Trabon: I think it was a couple years ago. He was like, I'm gonna go. It was during the academy. It's like I'm gonna go to the World War One you Sam, do you want to join and I was imagining how long of a day. That would be

863
01:26:56.190 --> 01:27:00.660
Tim Trabon: Not, not, not because the world war one museums, amazing, but I was kind of

864
01:27:02.250 --> 01:27:06.060
Tim Trabon: I am a kind of a fly through when it comes to me.

865
01:27:07.560 --> 01:27:10.620
Tim Trabon: I can't do more than three hours. That's my best.

866
01:27:11.010 --> 01:27:14.820
Dale Stephanos: Let's it's that's it's tiring. It is. I love museums, but it's tiring.

867
01:27:16.500 --> 01:27:18.090
Don Kilpatrick III: sensory overload sometimes

868
01:27:18.780 --> 01:27:28.380
John English: Day is a trip to the art supply store with George. Oh yes, I mean museum and it's about it's a it's an event, a long event.

869
01:27:30.240 --> 01:27:33.570
Tim Trabon: Haven't haven't ever been to the world war two Museum in New Orleans.

870
01:27:34.380 --> 01:27:35.520
Raymond Bonilla: No, not

871
01:27:36.510 --> 01:27:41.460
Tim Trabon: If I went to it. Three years ago in 2018

872
01:27:43.440 --> 01:27:54.450
Tim Trabon: And since then, if you were to tell me you are flying to New Orleans, just to go to the world war two museum, I'd be like, Yeah, that's a good that is a good trip.

873
01:27:54.990 --> 01:27:55.620
John English: That is worth it.

874
01:27:55.710 --> 01:27:56.670
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, wow.

875
01:27:57.360 --> 01:27:58.410
Tim Trabon: Highly recommended

876
01:27:59.640 --> 01:28:15.510
C. F. Payne: Dayton, Ohio has the Air Force Museum Wright Patterson Air Force Base, and that's where the Memphis Belle his house, they know about seven years ago, my wife and I, we were able to get tickets for a backstage pass where they were where they do all the

877
01:28:16.590 --> 01:28:19.230
C. F. Payne: reconstructions, and South fixing up

878
01:28:19.860 --> 01:28:20.310
Raymond Bonilla: Awesome.

879
01:28:20.580 --> 01:28:32.160
C. F. Payne: And so we got to see spend a day while they were working on the Memphis Belle, you know, and they had it all kind of, I mean they worked on that for 10 years to get that they were really machining parts.

880
01:28:32.850 --> 01:28:33.240
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

881
01:28:33.420 --> 01:28:41.310
C. F. Payne: There was a PBS program just recently on that. I think it was Sunday evening I was watching that it was quite fascinating.

882
01:28:41.880 --> 01:28:49.860
C. F. Payne: And the amount of work and I mean they, I mean the Memphis Belle was actually that you know it was the city of Memphis, who founded it was in a scrap yard.

883
01:28:50.760 --> 01:28:58.950
C. F. Payne: Ready to be just broken down and turned it into scrap for, you know, maybe, I don't know what they're going to use the metal for

884
01:28:59.400 --> 01:29:12.420
C. F. Payne: And they bought it for, I don't like like 350 bucks and brought it back to Memphis and they did a fair amount of restoration to it, but eventually their money ran out and

885
01:29:13.920 --> 01:29:14.280
C. F. Payne: The

886
01:29:15.570 --> 01:29:23.820
C. F. Payne: Air Force Museum. I KNEW YOU GO, THIS IS airports Museum at Wright Patt you cannot believe they've got everything they got everything

887
01:29:26.340 --> 01:29:26.910
C. F. Payne: They've got

888
01:29:28.140 --> 01:29:39.900
C. F. Payne: They got a wing. That is all. The earliest stuff and the Wright brothers and and Glenn Curtis, all the way through World War One World War Two. All the uniforms all the other stuff that's up there.

889
01:29:40.410 --> 01:29:53.970
C. F. Payne: And I think was last last year, I can't remember exactly what time of year was they had a show the Air Force art and Terry you you know these guys Keith Harris and Gil Cohen, were there and is Terry still here.

890
01:29:54.330 --> 01:29:58.680
Terry Brown: I am and you can't talk about Air Force art without talking about Keith Harris.

891
01:29:59.040 --> 01:30:00.510
C. F. Payne: Yeah, equals

892
01:30:00.870 --> 01:30:04.080
Terry Brown: F er risp should look him up. He's

893
01:30:04.710 --> 01:30:18.540
C. F. Payne: One of the best and that thing was I came up there and I was going into a bunch of people were there and and I said is Keith here he Ferris here because you don't get all worked with him I pissed him off once at the in our communities, but

894
01:30:20.850 --> 01:30:30.240
C. F. Payne: Nevertheless, he was there and he and his wife. He's like 90 years old, three years old and he and his wife drove in from New Jersey.

895
01:30:31.500 --> 01:30:32.850
Terry Brown: Peggy tough as nails.

896
01:30:33.090 --> 01:30:35.190
C. F. Payne: Yeah, and about four feet tall.

897
01:30:35.610 --> 01:30:35.970
Yes.

898
01:30:37.050 --> 01:30:47.640
C. F. Payne: And Keith is a probably about four foot 11 i mean he's not a big guy too and Gil colon was there and it was just fantastic. And you and they've, they've got an amazing art collection. Same thing with the

899
01:30:48.750 --> 01:30:54.000
C. F. Payne: Using him down at Pensacola, you know, the Navy airports museum down there were the Blue Angels are

900
01:30:55.860 --> 01:31:10.830
C. F. Payne: The they have got a great collection of art. So when we talk about not just the the equipment, the planes, the uniforms all the equipment. They also have great museums, with great art.

901
01:31:12.060 --> 01:31:12.330
Well,

902
01:31:13.560 --> 01:31:24.750
Terry Brown: Christian Christian's you mentioned Keith Harris and we mentioned the Red Tails. Why would you want to paint your plane bright red. Don't you think everyone's going to be able to see it.

903
01:31:25.200 --> 01:31:31.740
Terry Brown: Well, think about these planes game that we're going 10 miles an hour. I mean, they were making noise. They were loud. They were hiding anywhere.

904
01:31:32.340 --> 01:31:41.250
Terry Brown: Key Ferris went from that era. He was eyesight wasn't good enough for him to be a World War Two. So that's why I became an artist to being

905
01:31:42.000 --> 01:31:59.310
Terry Brown: Ultrasonic jet planes. He flew and every one of them right up to the F 35 the most modern one. Now, and he invented a camouflage system that if you painted the bottom of your jet fighter this particular pattern.

906
01:32:00.690 --> 01:32:11.340
Terry Brown: And you're taught your pilots to go at a certain degree to the sun at a certain angle against a certain background, you could for two seconds. Make your plane invisible.

907
01:32:12.240 --> 01:32:15.450
Terry Brown: Wow. And he put that up for bid.

908
01:32:16.560 --> 01:32:18.750
Terry Brown: And they were two bits. One was

909
01:32:19.350 --> 01:32:21.750
Terry Brown: Unsuccessful bid from the United States Air Force.

910
01:32:22.290 --> 01:32:29.370
Terry Brown: And there was the successful bid from the Israeli Air Force and it lasted for about three or four years.

911
01:32:30.390 --> 01:32:38.460
Terry Brown: And then the technology past, but he said be just got a moment of time here where the technology of painting a plane a certain way, at a certain angle at a certain time.

912
01:32:39.030 --> 01:32:52.110
Terry Brown: Can give you that moment of superiority in the air key Ferris takes that stuff real serious American Society of aviation artists is the group that to this day documents airplanes and

913
01:32:53.040 --> 01:32:54.540
Terry Brown: And and gang. I want. I'm going to

914
01:32:54.930 --> 01:33:07.470
Terry Brown: I'm going to bail. Thank you very much for having me and allowing me to Yak, a little more than I should have. You're doing great work. And I know somewhere, Roy is is laughing in his very special way. So thank you and good luck with your work.

915
01:33:07.620 --> 01:33:08.460
John English: Thank you very

916
01:33:09.390 --> 01:33:10.800
Raymond Bonilla: Much Terry has a daughter.

917
01:33:11.190 --> 01:33:12.060
Don Kilpatrick III: Yes. What

918
01:33:13.380 --> 01:33:14.340
Don Kilpatrick III: creasing

919
01:33:15.360 --> 01:33:16.440
John English: How much fun was that

920
01:33:17.370 --> 01:33:18.090
That was awesome.

921
01:33:19.980 --> 01:33:20.190
Dale Stephanos: Was

922
01:33:21.270 --> 01:33:22.560
Tim Trabon: ruined my night john

923
01:33:25.830 --> 01:33:27.060
Raymond Bonilla: over that time that TV.

924
01:33:34.380 --> 01:33:36.150
Tim Trabon: Let's move on to the next image.

925
01:33:37.740 --> 01:33:39.480
Tim Trabon: Here. Sorry. Right here all night.

926
01:33:39.690 --> 01:33:41.910
John English: Chris, that's wonderful. Thank you very much.

927
01:33:42.510 --> 01:33:43.050
C. F. Payne: That's good.

928
01:33:43.770 --> 01:33:45.660
Dale Stephanos: Thank you. Awesome. Awesome. Chris

929
01:33:47.550 --> 01:33:47.700
John English: And

930
01:33:47.850 --> 01:33:49.980
Tim Trabon: John you're about to say something. I was saying.

931
01:33:50.310 --> 01:33:51.180
John English: I was, I was gonna

932
01:33:52.200 --> 01:33:54.270
John English: I'm gonna wait till we get started on the next image.

933
01:33:54.570 --> 01:33:57.660
Tim Trabon: Yeah. Who's up next. Who's up next to back

934
01:33:57.840 --> 01:33:58.800
John English: On Kilpatrick

935
01:33:58.980 --> 01:34:00.300
Don Kilpatrick III: I think it's me. Yeah.

936
01:34:00.870 --> 01:34:03.360
John English: This is like surprise reference for you.

937
01:34:04.200 --> 01:34:06.570
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, no, I like it. This is great. I

938
01:34:07.620 --> 01:34:10.800
Don Kilpatrick III: And I love this shot, who's the pilot in this job.

939
01:34:11.190 --> 01:34:12.330
John English: This is

940
01:34:13.890 --> 01:34:15.420
John English: The should be titled

941
01:34:15.510 --> 01:34:18.810
John English: This, this is ALEC know got the wrong one. Here, hold on.

942
01:34:20.220 --> 01:34:22.020
Tim Trabon: An external herrity Stewart.

943
01:34:22.710 --> 01:34:25.530
Don Kilpatrick III: Yes, it's the image in the cockpit right

944
01:34:25.740 --> 01:34:26.460
John English: Correct.

945
01:34:27.180 --> 01:34:28.770
John English: Here, I'll make sure I got the right one here.

946
01:34:29.070 --> 01:34:30.720
John English: Yep. Harry to Stewart junior

947
01:34:32.010 --> 01:34:32.640
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, cool.

948
01:34:33.660 --> 01:34:44.310
John English: Interesting guy grew up in New York right next to LaGuardia before they before they were building the airport and got to watch it be built as a as a as a child.

949
01:34:44.700 --> 01:34:47.160
Tim Trabon: And he called it like a small airfield right

950
01:34:47.880 --> 01:34:51.510
John English: Yeah, jokingly you've posted that

951
01:34:52.170 --> 01:35:04.260
Tim Trabon: That yeah right yeah this yeah for some context, what we're trying tonight. You can watch a full, full hour like documentary about about our next two poses.

952
01:35:05.100 --> 01:35:14.820
Tim Trabon: were featured in this documentary and john you you've got, I know you've got kind of a notes together about it but highly recommend checking it out. Yeah.

953
01:35:14.850 --> 01:35:17.070
John English: It's a wonderful documentary

954
01:35:18.390 --> 01:35:23.970
John English: You'll be amazed at what these people were able to accomplish and what they went through.

955
01:35:25.800 --> 01:35:31.140
John English: This this individual right after he the war was over.

956
01:35:32.370 --> 01:35:38.910
John English: He had they had in the very through in the very first Top Gun challenge. He was one of three that the

957
01:35:40.200 --> 01:35:45.150
John English: Was elected to fly in it and he won the very first top gun.

958
01:35:46.170 --> 01:35:49.320
John English: Challenge. What we know is the great Tom Cruise movie.

959
01:35:50.490 --> 01:35:51.000
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

960
01:35:51.150 --> 01:36:02.490
Tim Trabon: Yeah, I will say, I learned a lot this week. And one of the things I learned this week and I'm ashamed of is that top gun is not just a Tom Cruise film.

961
01:36:04.110 --> 01:36:05.700
Tim Trabon: I really didn't know that I am

962
01:36:05.730 --> 01:36:07.650
Raymond Bonilla: Like super I was unable school

963
01:36:08.370 --> 01:36:13.530
Tim Trabon: I don't know. I thought it was like a catchy Hollywood title that they came up with.

964
01:36:13.800 --> 01:36:17.490
Dale Stephanos: I decided to the end. So don't worry, where those two dummies your

965
01:36:17.880 --> 01:36:18.240
Dog.

966
01:36:19.980 --> 01:36:21.270
Tim Trabon: I also never saw them.

967
01:36:21.810 --> 01:36:22.320
Don Kilpatrick III: Come on.

968
01:36:22.590 --> 01:36:24.270
Tim Trabon: I never saw the movie.

969
01:36:24.450 --> 01:36:26.280
Dale Stephanos: Now that's that's real. It is

970
01:36:26.310 --> 01:36:27.870
Tim Trabon: No way that I remit it

971
01:36:28.410 --> 01:36:32.250
Raymond Bonilla: Right, this is, this is like watching

972
01:36:32.280 --> 01:36:36.000
Tim Trabon: I'm sure I've seen every scene from like TBS

973
01:36:36.270 --> 01:36:36.960
When I was

974
01:36:38.220 --> 01:36:38.820
Don Kilpatrick III: That movie.

975
01:36:40.590 --> 01:36:41.190
Dale Stephanos: What's I thought

976
01:36:41.610 --> 01:36:44.250
Don Kilpatrick III: I wanted a bomber jacket because of that movie. Yes.

977
01:36:45.150 --> 01:36:47.580
Tim Trabon: I didn't mean john. I didn't mean to detract though.

978
01:36:47.640 --> 01:36:48.210
John English: It's okay, what

979
01:36:49.380 --> 01:36:53.130
John English: What actually the one I was originally going to say was the very first

980
01:36:54.360 --> 01:36:58.080
John English: The very, very first educational recording that I ever did.

981
01:37:00.060 --> 01:37:01.110
John English: Was with Terry brown

982
01:37:02.940 --> 01:37:18.210
John English: And Terry put up a talk together about current history in the society of illustrators kind of wrapped a whole bunch of things together and he had probably six or eight pages of 12 point type

983
01:37:19.290 --> 01:37:32.970
John English: Printed out and we Brent watkinson was filming them and we were standing together. I was interviewing Terry and I said well terrier. I mean, I'm not sure how you're going to do this you're going to are you going to like verbatim.

984
01:37:34.200 --> 01:37:49.110
John English: Read this. Do you need to be able to see your notes and you just want to be goes, No, I got it and turn the camera on and 20 minutes later he went through the eight pages of copy verbatim without looking at it.

985
01:37:50.490 --> 01:37:53.280
John English: Was just like, Oh, that hurts.

986
01:37:54.990 --> 01:37:58.230
John English: Every time and Timmy will tell you every time he puts a camera on me. It's

987
01:37:59.850 --> 01:38:08.550
John English: Just start stuttering. And so I was totally marveled at his ability to deliver information so smoothly. And I think part of the

988
01:38:08.910 --> 01:38:09.360
Agreement.

989
01:38:11.430 --> 01:38:13.800
Tim Trabon: Or Gianna. I'll bring your super cut

990
01:38:14.250 --> 01:38:14.520
John English: Yeah.

991
01:38:14.550 --> 01:38:16.140
John English: Please do week. Yeah.

992
01:38:17.160 --> 01:38:18.480
John English: You can tell them what that is.

993
01:38:18.870 --> 01:38:20.310
John English: My dragon find it entertaining.

994
01:38:21.090 --> 01:38:22.920
Tim Trabon: Okay, well I'm glad I have permission.

995
01:38:24.810 --> 01:38:29.640
Tim Trabon: Guys I I interviewed john that was like eight years ago now.

996
01:38:31.890 --> 01:38:35.820
Tim Trabon: I think he was like, yeah, it was like eight years ago I interviewed john and

997
01:38:37.200 --> 01:38:47.340
Tim Trabon: He had. It was a rough interview I probably is probably my fault. I probably wasn't creating the right environment but john was pretty frustrated and

998
01:38:47.970 --> 01:39:02.130
Tim Trabon: As I was editing the interview I every time john would say kind of unsavory word. Hey, I would. I'd cut it out and I kind of put it off to the side just to save it.

999
01:39:04.770 --> 01:39:09.780
Tim Trabon: And I, by the time I was done, I had like 300 like

1000
01:39:10.920 --> 01:39:11.640
Tim Trabon: Like it was

1001
01:39:12.210 --> 01:39:14.400
Tim Trabon: It was like a two minute video

1002
01:39:16.890 --> 01:39:23.760
Tim Trabon: I was just, just a super cat of john just, just kidding. Ah.

1003
01:39:23.820 --> 01:39:24.180
Dale Stephanos: Well,

1004
01:39:24.450 --> 01:39:26.310
Tim Trabon: I want to do it because I know their kids.

1005
01:39:26.610 --> 01:39:29.640
John English: Yeah but anybody that's been around me much and

1006
01:39:30.630 --> 01:39:30.960
Tim Trabon: I don't

1007
01:39:30.990 --> 01:39:34.650
John English: Swear that much, but I got it all out in that video.

1008
01:39:34.860 --> 01:39:35.580
Dale Stephanos: It was

1009
01:39:36.540 --> 01:39:42.150
Tim Trabon: It was. Yeah, yeah. If you want the videos send an email to hello visual arts, guys.

1010
01:39:44.520 --> 01:39:46.890
Tim Trabon: I'll send you a copy. I'll just send you a copy

1011
01:39:48.750 --> 01:39:50.250
Raymond Bonilla: If you sign up for three to

1012
01:39:50.340 --> 01:39:53.400
Tim Trabon: Yes, if you sign up for two classes, you get a copy of

1013
01:39:53.430 --> 01:39:56.610
Dale Stephanos: Or you get a bonus, you get a bonus JOHN. JOHN swearing video

1014
01:39:56.730 --> 01:39:57.450
Yeah.

1015
01:39:59.040 --> 01:39:59.370
Dale Stephanos: Meet

1016
01:39:59.610 --> 01:40:00.480
Raymond Bonilla: You on director

1017
01:40:00.990 --> 01:40:02.160
C. F. Payne: With john does Chris

1018
01:40:03.240 --> 01:40:04.560
C. F. Payne: Back and starting to give me a little

1019
01:40:04.560 --> 01:40:07.170
C. F. Payne: Bit of problems, right. The one step way. It's been a long day.

1020
01:40:07.410 --> 01:40:09.360
John English: Chris, thank you so much, or champ.

1021
01:40:09.360 --> 01:40:12.690
John English: For being here tonight after what you went through today. Thank you so much.

1022
01:40:12.870 --> 01:40:13.140
Dale Stephanos: That was

1023
01:40:14.040 --> 01:40:14.910
John English: Awesome, hey,

1024
01:40:15.150 --> 01:40:16.260
John English: Chris, call me tomorrow.

1025
01:40:17.310 --> 01:40:19.380
John English: I think you will. So give me a call.

1026
01:40:20.040 --> 01:40:24.180
C. F. Payne: Yeah, and I'll post these drawings here up a little bit later on. Okay.

1027
01:40:25.410 --> 01:40:27.840
C. F. Payne: Tears and lay down for a few minutes on my back my back.

1028
01:40:28.440 --> 01:40:28.980
Bill Koeb: Oh, man.

1029
01:40:29.400 --> 01:40:30.240
John English: Okay. Good night.

1030
01:40:31.650 --> 01:40:33.120
Tim Trabon: During the webcam. I mean,

1031
01:40:36.480 --> 01:40:37.110
Tim Trabon: Just

1032
01:40:39.060 --> 01:40:39.630
Don Kilpatrick III: All the

1033
01:40:40.590 --> 01:40:42.930
John English: Extra what a good guy, man.

1034
01:40:43.230 --> 01:40:43.530
Yeah.

1035
01:40:44.820 --> 01:40:45.270
Bill Koeb: And

1036
01:40:45.630 --> 01:40:46.650
John English: You can draw a little bit

1037
01:40:47.250 --> 01:40:47.790
Dale Stephanos: Little bit.

1038
01:40:48.660 --> 01:40:49.560
John English: Just a little bit.

1039
01:40:50.520 --> 01:40:58.380
Raymond Bonilla: I was gonna take issue with his, his quote unquote demo, I'm like, it shouldn't be a drawing them. I was like a dragon portfolio demo. Yeah.

1040
01:40:58.920 --> 01:41:01.710
John English: Yeah, have you just, just for reference.

1041
01:41:02.850 --> 01:41:05.790
John English: I actually sent to me, one of them. I sent me a

1042
01:41:06.990 --> 01:41:15.750
John English: Photo of the way brothers that that that Chris just sent to me the the dual portrait, the double portrait. He did have the way brothers.

1043
01:41:15.930 --> 01:41:16.770
Raymond Bonilla: Well, yeah, yeah.

1044
01:41:17.460 --> 01:41:22.770
John English: And I sent that and you know he tears tears it out of the sketchbook. It's got the rough dead and you know

1045
01:41:24.000 --> 01:41:37.560
John English: And never see those sketchbooks. I mean, I just look at I'm amazed because there and what is her 40 pages 2840. I don't know how many pages are in one of those sketchbooks and every one of them.

1046
01:41:38.070 --> 01:41:46.080
John English: Is a full painting me it's like it's every one of them is one of those pieces and he just tosses them around like they're nothing and i'm saying is

1047
01:41:48.840 --> 01:41:58.320
John English: Absolutely amazing. And you know, it's like one, you know, one little thing like this has, you know, will call it will call it 36 Chris pains inside of it.

1048
01:41:59.880 --> 01:42:00.660
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that

1049
01:42:01.770 --> 01:42:02.190
Bill Koeb: Was that

1050
01:42:02.280 --> 01:42:02.850
blew me away.

1051
01:42:05.970 --> 01:42:11.550
Bill Koeb: He was just flipping through them and it's like there's 50 amazing pieces there.

1052
01:42:13.200 --> 01:42:19.710
Dale Stephanos: You know, that's what I always get a kick out of when people see him do demos.

1053
01:42:20.880 --> 01:42:30.060
Dale Stephanos: And I started today. Again, and Instagram. You know, and I saw john when I when I was at the Academy. People are always like, Oh, well, what am I, what kind of papers that what kind of

1054
01:42:30.780 --> 01:42:38.580
Dale Stephanos: What kind of, what kind of recruiters at quash or acrylic and it's like it's drawing. It's, it's not the guy can draw

1055
01:42:39.090 --> 01:42:39.240
It.

1056
01:42:41.160 --> 01:42:42.450
Raymond Bonilla: It's the cheapest

1057
01:42:42.570 --> 01:42:44.250
Raymond Bonilla: sketchbook. You can probably get

1058
01:42:44.250 --> 01:42:48.510
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, reacting to someone who can draw their butt off.

1059
01:42:49.230 --> 01:42:49.590
John English: Right.

1060
01:42:49.740 --> 01:42:50.820
Dale Stephanos: Matter what he's using

1061
01:42:51.270 --> 01:42:53.790
Don Kilpatrick III: You just using that strap more pad right like

1062
01:42:54.120 --> 01:42:55.350
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my godson stuff that

1063
01:42:55.800 --> 01:42:59.640
Raymond Bonilla: I get a free pass every, every semester when we start teaching like day

1064
01:43:00.210 --> 01:43:04.200
Raymond Bonilla: One and it's like half of app with the teachers don't want even sick.

1065
01:43:05.340 --> 01:43:05.940
Raymond Bonilla: It's just

1066
01:43:06.300 --> 01:43:09.990
Raymond Bonilla: It's, it's, it doesn't matter. It's like he's just like, it's incredible.

1067
01:43:11.400 --> 01:43:12.570
John English: Yes okay for him.

1068
01:43:13.230 --> 01:43:19.140
Raymond Bonilla: It's okay. Right. It's like somebody asked me a deal. Right. Somebody asked him, like the weight of the paper or something.

1069
01:43:19.230 --> 01:43:20.280
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

1070
01:43:21.780 --> 01:43:23.580
Raymond Bonilla: I don't even know. Is it a, you know,

1071
01:43:24.600 --> 01:43:26.700
Bill Koeb: He's like, I buy him because I 10 bucks a pop

1072
01:43:26.820 --> 01:43:27.330
Raymond Bonilla: Right, because

1073
01:43:29.280 --> 01:43:31.530
Bill Koeb: It says 13 but I get them on discount

1074
01:43:34.110 --> 01:43:42.840
John English: As much as we talk about that but Chris, I mean, he really does care. You know what he cares about is how his pencil reacts to the drawing reacts to the paper.

1075
01:43:43.140 --> 01:43:44.070
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

1076
01:43:44.520 --> 01:43:45.540
John English: That's what he cares about

1077
01:43:48.570 --> 01:43:49.920
Dale Stephanos: But one thing he said it's

1078
01:43:49.950 --> 01:43:50.580
Bill Koeb: His suit.

1079
01:43:52.170 --> 01:43:56.280
Dale Stephanos: No matter what he uses his work is going to look like Chris painted it

1080
01:43:56.640 --> 01:43:57.900
Bill Koeb: Yeah yeah

1081
01:43:59.640 --> 01:44:10.290
Don Kilpatrick III: Well, that I really liked that because I don't know about you, all but I get hung up on I get like almost depressed it but certain you know sketchbook is not made anymore.

1082
01:44:11.070 --> 01:44:21.030
Don Kilpatrick III: And, you know, it just goes to show you just really focus on what's most important. It'll come out, whether it's a you know $10 sketchbook or a 40 hour work. Yeah.

1083
01:44:23.310 --> 01:44:24.840
Raymond Bonilla: You know, yeah.

1084
01:44:25.410 --> 01:44:33.780
Don Kilpatrick III: I messed up on that stuff I'd love to say that, oh, yeah, it's no big deal for me but man I yeah that's a tough one. Yeah.

1085
01:44:34.020 --> 01:44:38.010
Bill Koeb: Yeah, there's, I mean there's stuff to camp fine now, which is just

1086
01:44:39.540 --> 01:44:42.660
Bill Koeb: You know there's paper that you like to draw on. And then she like to us.

1087
01:44:44.010 --> 01:44:53.100
Don Kilpatrick III: And I think he was the one that told me, he said, yet. You know, I remember telling him what I was using once this is a long time ago. He's like, yeah, well just love it now because they're going to stop making it

1088
01:44:54.570 --> 01:44:54.930
Bill Koeb: Any

1089
01:44:54.990 --> 01:44:55.980
Don Kilpatrick III: Right, you know,

1090
01:44:57.210 --> 01:44:58.920
Raymond Bonilla: What do you know man.

1091
01:45:01.200 --> 01:45:02.460
Don Kilpatrick III: Good, you know,

1092
01:45:04.080 --> 01:45:04.590
Bill Koeb: One.

1093
01:45:05.700 --> 01:45:07.050
John English: Days. That's what

1094
01:45:09.210 --> 01:45:11.490
John English: Kids these days is

1095
01:45:14.100 --> 01:45:14.820
Tim Trabon: A slogan.

1096
01:45:19.980 --> 01:45:29.070
Raymond Bonilla: Remember David Grove was very much like that he had a, like a specific brand of illustration board that he loved and they substate

1097
01:45:29.550 --> 01:45:43.680
Raymond Bonilla: One day he got like the same you would buy the same the same brand same everything the same. And then one day he got he was working on it and something was wrong and he called up the factory. They're like, oh yeah, we

1098
01:45:44.760 --> 01:45:55.980
Raymond Bonilla: We, we changed, like where we source our paper rag from and and such and such, because it was a little cheaper to do that. But you know, it's still the same. And he's like, No, it's not the same.

1099
01:45:57.030 --> 01:46:09.090
Raymond Bonilla: So then he called around he found this like in the middle of the Midwest, he found an art supply store that still had the original like his favorite like

1100
01:46:09.960 --> 01:46:27.450
Raymond Bonilla: Type of illustration board before they do change the process and he brought the two pallets of it. And he was like, can you ship me those two paths that you want all of them, sir, he goes I want every single illustration board in stock that you have

1101
01:46:29.700 --> 01:46:30.210
Don Kilpatrick III: For

1102
01:46:30.690 --> 01:46:31.050
Dinner.

1103
01:46:32.790 --> 01:46:35.400
Don Kilpatrick III: Couldn't get it done that week you know

1104
01:46:37.830 --> 01:46:41.460
Don Kilpatrick III: I probably why that guy that would have been like, I can't buy any illustration board.

1105
01:46:42.480 --> 01:46:42.810
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

1106
01:46:44.400 --> 01:46:54.000
Don Kilpatrick III: That's awesome. Well, you know, they did you know there's, there's, you know, I know a strap more. This has been a few years ago, they did change the sizing on it, it was

1107
01:46:54.540 --> 01:47:02.340
Don Kilpatrick III: screwed me up for a bit and I kind of stopped using it because of that. But I've used that sense. And I'm like, what was I thinking, I don't know, I just forgot

1108
01:47:03.360 --> 01:47:03.810
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1109
01:47:04.290 --> 01:47:08.820
Dale Stephanos: With that CS 10 board that was that stuff was great for

1110
01:47:12.060 --> 01:47:27.720
Dale Stephanos: Us to airbrush and that was great for for erasing and for like using an exacto blade because it had like a field like a sizing was like a almost like a really fine Jessel so you could scratch into it but

1111
01:47:28.740 --> 01:47:31.290
Dale Stephanos: almost infinitely and you weren't destroying anything

1112
01:47:31.740 --> 01:47:32.580
Raymond Bonilla: Wow, really.

1113
01:47:32.910 --> 01:47:33.870
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, it was awesome.

1114
01:47:35.430 --> 01:47:37.020
Dale Stephanos: And then I heard that.

1115
01:47:39.180 --> 01:47:48.330
Dale Stephanos: It was going out or it was leaving and I tried to get some and buddy of mine told me that Mark. Mark Frederickson had had bought like thousands of dollars worth

1116
01:47:50.520 --> 01:47:50.730
Dale Stephanos: Can

1117
01:47:51.240 --> 01:47:52.320
Dale Stephanos: Be used so

1118
01:47:54.390 --> 01:47:57.210
Don Kilpatrick III: It would, it would be, you know, gosh.

1119
01:47:57.480 --> 01:48:08.790
John English: George Pratt did that with the quill pens that certain nip that he liked that he found he found it. Get, get them online. And I think he bought everything on the

1120
01:48:10.710 --> 01:48:12.360
Tim Trabon: That's why they disappear.

1121
01:48:12.480 --> 01:48:13.290
John English: Anymore, you

1122
01:48:14.580 --> 01:48:18.810
Tim Trabon: Guys, you realize you're all messing up the market. That's why they disappear.

1123
01:48:19.170 --> 01:48:19.530
That's

1124
01:48:21.990 --> 01:48:23.310
Tim Trabon: The panic buys

1125
01:48:25.110 --> 01:48:25.530
Bill Koeb: Final

1126
01:48:25.860 --> 01:48:27.450
Tim Trabon: Paper which Diana.

1127
01:48:27.570 --> 01:48:29.070
John English: What are you drawing with right now.

1128
01:48:30.900 --> 01:48:31.350
John English: Don

1129
01:48:31.770 --> 01:48:33.960
John English: Wilson, what are you drawing with right now.

1130
01:48:34.050 --> 01:48:43.260
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, so these, these are these paint markers that Francis Vallejo term me to Pasta. Pasta unique Pasco

1131
01:48:43.710 --> 01:48:51.540
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh yeah, there's other means to there's over is a motto or Molotov you know there's there's

1132
01:48:51.570 --> 01:48:52.530
You know, there's a few different

1133
01:48:53.580 --> 01:49:02.070
Don Kilpatrick III: Techniques one but you know he he turned me on to these. A few years ago, and you know, I've kind of had him sitting around

1134
01:49:02.910 --> 01:49:09.210
Don Kilpatrick III: For a while, and I just, you know, today I was I was getting ready I'm teaching a passion illustration class next semester.

1135
01:49:10.020 --> 01:49:14.970
Don Kilpatrick III: And I'm getting everything ready for that. And it's like, you know, I wanted to try something different. That would be just easy and fun.

1136
01:49:15.660 --> 01:49:25.890
Don Kilpatrick III: And I really enjoy these, they're just, you know, they don't let you get in and kind of, you know, worry about so much. You just have to lay it in and they work really well. I've got a

1137
01:49:27.660 --> 01:49:35.040
Don Kilpatrick III: I don't even know what brand, this is this is a Japanese like you know brush marker pen that you can get on, I think, Chet pins or something like that.

1138
01:49:35.460 --> 01:49:37.290
Tim Trabon: Well, before you know he

1139
01:49:39.600 --> 01:49:41.070
Don Kilpatrick III: Buys every single one of them, but

1140
01:49:42.930 --> 01:49:58.470
Don Kilpatrick III: But, um, but no. I mean, you know, it's, it's, I just, I'm just having fun with this because, you know, I just wanted to do something that didn't really take up a lot of time for me to set up and but I could get a little bit of painting that's like a beautiful man.

1141
01:50:00.480 --> 01:50:01.500
Don Kilpatrick III: Cheese ray

1142
01:50:02.820 --> 01:50:06.240
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, thanks a lot. Take a couple

1143
01:50:08.940 --> 01:50:11.730
Raymond Bonilla: Minutes, I've taken a couple of Timmy hours to do

1144
01:50:12.180 --> 01:50:14.040
Tim Trabon: Here, let me go to race.

1145
01:50:14.130 --> 01:50:16.020
Don Kilpatrick III: I'm surprised he gave you any so

1146
01:50:17.250 --> 01:50:18.840
Don Kilpatrick III: He wasn't gonna give you any of those, but

1147
01:50:21.060 --> 01:50:24.090
Tim Trabon: Yeah. Carrie burn through all the Timmy minutes

1148
01:50:27.630 --> 01:50:28.260
Don Kilpatrick III: You don't dissolve.

1149
01:50:28.290 --> 01:50:29.730
Tim Trabon: And honestly, he kind of just

1150
01:50:29.730 --> 01:50:30.720
Tim Trabon: Took it from me.

1151
01:50:30.870 --> 01:50:31.710
They weren't given

1152
01:50:33.060 --> 01:50:33.300
Don Kilpatrick III: Like

1153
01:50:37.170 --> 01:50:44.190
Tim Trabon: JOHN I had one question I wanted to ask, cherry, I didn't get to. But was he around when my dad.

1154
01:50:45.420 --> 01:50:47.610
Tim Trabon: ended up going to the society of illustrators.

1155
01:50:48.270 --> 01:50:49.770
John English: He was the director of the program.

1156
01:50:49.950 --> 01:50:59.910
Tim Trabon: So was he, at any point if you're so I'm assuming. Then he met my dad and was like, oh, he's the guy that we gave those metals to that had no business.

1157
01:51:01.380 --> 01:51:01.800
Tim Trabon: No.

1158
01:51:05.070 --> 01:51:06.150
John English: You should tell you should tell

1159
01:51:06.510 --> 01:51:07.770
Tim Trabon: It's a really good story.

1160
01:51:08.010 --> 01:51:09.360
John English: It's an entertaining story.

1161
01:51:09.780 --> 01:51:11.760
Tim Trabon: Where we at where we how much time we have

1162
01:51:12.090 --> 01:51:12.510
Tim Trabon: We have

1163
01:51:13.020 --> 01:51:14.940
John English: We have plenty of time.

1164
01:51:15.990 --> 01:51:16.920
Don Kilpatrick III: Yes. Go for it, man.

1165
01:51:18.510 --> 01:51:25.020
Tim Trabon: John and my dad. If you haven't, you know, tuned in before our dads go way back.

1166
01:51:26.850 --> 01:51:36.660
Tim Trabon: And have they were best friends when they both were around but when my dad was a young man, he would have been john LIKE LATE 20s, maybe 30

1167
01:51:37.530 --> 01:51:39.510
John English: Oh yeah, he met your dad when he was 27

1168
01:51:40.140 --> 01:51:41.160
Tim Trabon: Okay, or

1169
01:51:41.820 --> 01:51:52.440
Tim Trabon: 2025 actually okay so so my dad was a printer, but he was a printer. He was printing like business cards for like local plumbers.

1170
01:51:53.040 --> 01:52:03.270
Tim Trabon: You know, or just not not glamorous at all. And he really admired this idea of being a creative and kind of having a bigger

1171
01:52:03.840 --> 01:52:14.250
Tim Trabon: He wanted a bigger point to everything kind of going on and and so he had this idea of, like, I'm going to print I should get into like printing art for artists that would be no

1172
01:52:14.970 --> 01:52:27.840
Tim Trabon: I'd have this more interesting if I'd be surrounded by more interesting people. And he was at a bar that was doubling as his office and last port called Kelly's and

1173
01:52:28.890 --> 01:52:34.800
Tim Trabon: There was a creative director from Hallmark there. And he was like, you should meet this Illustrator.

1174
01:52:36.090 --> 01:52:48.480
Tim Trabon: Marketing coach. He's one of the most you know i mean he's the guy. And my dad, not knowing any better said I'll need to see his work for

1175
01:52:52.740 --> 01:52:54.210
Tim Trabon: Right and so

1176
01:52:54.960 --> 01:52:55.680
Don Kilpatrick III: That's the audition.

1177
01:52:56.010 --> 01:52:59.700
Tim Trabon: You know, so, yeah. So Mark, past the kid Trayvon audition.

1178
01:53:01.020 --> 01:53:15.750
Tim Trabon: Right, yeah. So, so the first the first job that my dad and done. I don't know what your dad. What made him make the decision or was he the type to just be like, I like giving out first shots.

1179
01:53:15.780 --> 01:53:21.420
John English: To pee know he did. I know what it was. It was a catalog that he did of his of his own work.

1180
01:53:21.660 --> 01:53:25.920
Tim Trabon: But why did he, why did he let my dad do it. I don't know.

1181
01:53:25.980 --> 01:53:29.040
John English: Oh, because your father printed it for him as a favor.

1182
01:53:29.730 --> 01:53:30.180
Okay.

1183
01:53:31.200 --> 01:53:32.910
Tim Trabon: That makes sense. So it was

1184
01:53:32.940 --> 01:53:47.250
Tim Trabon: So they both my dad is getting the opportunity for recognition and Mark was getting free printing. So as a fair, they did the trade and so my dad was printing it and

1185
01:53:48.360 --> 01:54:01.920
Tim Trabon: I make all these jokes about my dad. My dad had the best understanding of color of anybody I've ever met my mile as a printer. He had to, and he was printing the

1186
01:54:03.510 --> 01:54:07.860
Tim Trabon: Association and john you you know the painting. I don't know. It was

1187
01:54:09.030 --> 01:54:10.650
John English: Actually, that was a different. I thought you were

1188
01:54:10.710 --> 01:54:11.100
Tim Trabon: Okay.

1189
01:54:11.220 --> 01:54:13.920
John English: So that that was a piece for the American parks.

1190
01:54:14.700 --> 01:54:16.260
John English: So national parks.

1191
01:54:16.290 --> 01:54:30.270
Tim Trabon: So, so it's like it's like three, you know, my dad's hours were like from like 8am to 4am right i printing in the basement of the house. I'm actually that I actually live in right now and

1192
01:54:32.310 --> 01:54:42.360
Tim Trabon: He kept looking at this work and it's like, I just don't like this frame that the border. The color of it just is terrible. It's not worth

1193
01:54:42.930 --> 01:54:58.290
Tim Trabon: It so he caught. He tried to call Mark, you know, like in the middle of the night and he was like, Nobody answered. And he was like, I'm just gonna take this in my own hands. And so he correct if the color of the border of Mark English at

1194
01:54:58.590 --> 01:55:18.120
Tim Trabon: Oh my god. Right. Um, you know, as a young john like yeah, it's like a young 20 something just was like, I'll do that. I mean, that like nothing sums up my dad more than that. And then to to marks character Mark saw it was like okay

1195
01:55:19.230 --> 01:55:30.030
Tim Trabon: And approved and then when he submitted it at the end of the year. So the society of illustrators. He listed. My dad is the art director and my dad ended up winning a gold medal.

1196
01:55:35.040 --> 01:55:36.990
Tim Trabon: So my dad flies out to

1197
01:55:37.320 --> 01:55:38.880
Tim Trabon: New York to accept the award.

1198
01:55:40.980 --> 01:55:44.730
Tim Trabon: Person. It was like, well, I'm going to own it. If I got the award. I mean,

1199
01:55:46.440 --> 01:55:48.240
Tim Trabon: My tonight, you know, except this

1200
01:55:49.980 --> 01:55:51.180
Tim Trabon: And then he said that he

1201
01:55:52.800 --> 01:55:54.780
Tim Trabon: He landed and

1202
01:55:55.560 --> 01:55:59.400
Tim Trabon: He got there the afternoon before the ceremony and

1203
01:56:00.540 --> 01:56:10.500
Tim Trabon: This is Mike. My favorite part, because this is totally your dad style john he said that mark. He called Mark from his aunt's house in New York and

1204
01:56:11.370 --> 01:56:23.520
Tim Trabon: He was like, I'm here. I'll see you in like four hours and marks like. Yeah. Oh. Also be sure to where it's black time. Just be sure you ready for that. My dad was like, what

1205
01:56:26.310 --> 01:56:35.610
Tim Trabon: AND TO MY AUNT, MY AUNT, MY AUNT pulled off like a miracle and got a suit fitted for a suit like

1206
01:56:36.510 --> 01:56:37.830
Raymond Bonilla: In knows. Wow, my

1207
01:56:37.830 --> 01:56:50.910
Tim Trabon: God get and oh, she's like she's a unreal want it, but the my favorite thing is he said he she puts him in a car sends in there. My dad did not know you know

1208
01:56:51.600 --> 01:57:06.750
Tim Trabon: Right out of Kansas City doesn't know what he's doing. He, he pulls up in front of the society of illustrators marks outside, smoking a cigarette and he says the door, you know, driver opens up the door. My dad gets out soon. He was like, he makes sense.

1209
01:57:09.330 --> 01:57:12.690
Tim Trabon: How do you get here. Yeah, so I

1210
01:57:13.740 --> 01:57:15.780
Tim Trabon: Have like a dozen shenanigans like that.

1211
01:57:15.990 --> 01:57:22.560
John English: Well, I'm going to finish that by in Your Dad's office that gold medal and then another one that

1212
01:57:22.950 --> 01:57:34.320
John English: Is a catalog of the first gallery show that he had first showed a museum. He had and he had your father print the catalog any listed him as the art director for anyone. Another gold medal for it.

1213
01:57:34.980 --> 01:57:36.180
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my god.

1214
01:57:36.570 --> 01:57:37.050
Yeah.

1215
01:57:38.220 --> 01:57:41.280
John English: So every time. Tim and I would get in an argument about

1216
01:57:41.310 --> 01:57:42.360
Tim Trabon: Always the worst.

1217
01:57:42.360 --> 01:57:45.510
John English: He would look at me and he goes, JOHN, you know, I have two gold medals.

1218
01:57:49.020 --> 01:57:57.270
Tim Trabon: I'd be like designing our website and we get no conversation about design. And he'd be like, I have two gold medals as director

1219
01:58:00.120 --> 01:58:02.070
Tim Trabon: You're going to argue with me about design.

1220
01:58:04.740 --> 01:58:05.070
John English: Man.

1221
01:58:06.030 --> 01:58:07.710
Tim Trabon: You're making this really difficult than

1222
01:58:11.460 --> 01:58:14.430
John English: So read you ever forget which way the piece actually goes

1223
01:58:15.420 --> 01:58:16.980
John English: Never perfect

1224
01:58:18.510 --> 01:58:18.990
Raymond Bonilla: Like

1225
01:58:19.530 --> 01:58:21.570
Raymond Bonilla: I was like, which way does it go

1226
01:58:21.870 --> 01:58:23.820
Raymond Bonilla: I was actually just asking myself that question. I

1227
01:58:23.820 --> 01:58:24.900
Raymond Bonilla: Think it's this way. Right.

1228
01:58:24.990 --> 01:58:26.880
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay.

1229
01:58:27.240 --> 01:58:28.290
John English: Well Lesnar

1230
01:58:28.350 --> 01:58:34.800
John English: In a demo one day admitted he said sometimes he just leaves it he said he can't remember which way supposed to be.

1231
01:58:35.850 --> 01:58:36.300
John English: That way.

1232
01:58:36.870 --> 01:58:39.900
Raymond Bonilla: whatever looks good, you know, yeah, I'm finished.

1233
01:58:40.320 --> 01:58:41.070
Bill Koeb: That's great.

1234
01:58:41.160 --> 01:58:41.760
John English: Oh, it's beautiful.

1235
01:58:43.110 --> 01:58:43.620
Don Kilpatrick III: Yes.

1236
01:58:45.390 --> 01:58:45.810
John English: Killer.

1237
01:58:47.880 --> 01:58:50.460
John English: Done. You got four minutes, roughly

1238
01:58:50.820 --> 01:58:52.860
Tim Trabon: Don, I accidentally muted you.

1239
01:58:55.710 --> 01:58:57.390
Tim Trabon: Totally is totally an accident.

1240
01:58:57.990 --> 01:59:00.750
John English: That's a little trick, Timmy has when he starts to tell a story.

1241
01:59:00.810 --> 01:59:03.120
Tim Trabon: I swear I didn't mean to do

1242
01:59:06.060 --> 01:59:07.290
John English: It's cool owning the room.

1243
01:59:07.770 --> 01:59:08.880
Raymond Bonilla: Is the major pity.

1244
01:59:11.250 --> 01:59:12.030
Don Kilpatrick III: Man.

1245
01:59:12.510 --> 01:59:16.050
Tim Trabon: Good, good to know. I'm never gonna you're never gonna mute Don

1246
01:59:17.070 --> 01:59:17.670
Don Kilpatrick III: Ever

1247
01:59:18.060 --> 01:59:21.690
Tim Trabon: Because he gives me a good chuckle when you need it.

1248
01:59:23.610 --> 01:59:26.490
Dale Stephanos: But she's here you're saying he's your man.

1249
01:59:26.850 --> 01:59:29.190
Tim Trabon: Yeah, yeah. He's the

1250
01:59:30.210 --> 01:59:32.160
Tim Trabon: Director of illustrations isolate

1251
01:59:37.770 --> 01:59:43.260
Bill Koeb: The trouble is both of those references are are too old for a lot of our audience.

1252
01:59:43.470 --> 01:59:45.180
Tim Trabon: Andy Richter busy.

1253
01:59:45.660 --> 01:59:47.070
Bill Koeb: I think so, yeah. At this point,

1254
01:59:48.750 --> 01:59:49.050
Raymond Bonilla: Well,

1255
01:59:49.170 --> 01:59:52.410
Raymond Bonilla: I don't know, Michael. Welcome to the outside the site guys to me.

1256
01:59:54.420 --> 01:59:58.770
Tim Trabon: No, I refuse. I believe it.

1257
01:59:59.250 --> 02:00:00.180
Don Kilpatrick III: He doesn't still

1258
02:00:00.450 --> 02:00:02.070
Tim Trabon: Would be that he still Conan

1259
02:00:02.910 --> 02:00:04.170
Dale Stephanos: Is he is

1260
02:00:04.260 --> 02:00:04.650
Dale Stephanos: Yeah.

1261
02:00:04.830 --> 02:00:06.360
He does. Okay. I couldn't

1262
02:00:08.190 --> 02:00:08.610
Tim Trabon: Say,

1263
02:00:09.180 --> 02:00:09.810
Don Kilpatrick III: I haven't watched

1264
02:00:09.990 --> 02:00:16.170
Tim Trabon: Conan, yeah. I mean, the truth is, is nobody had an age of 25 knows who went late night TV is

1265
02:00:16.710 --> 02:00:17.070
Right.

1266
02:00:18.420 --> 02:00:19.680
Tim Trabon: There like you mean that like

1267
02:00:21.330 --> 02:00:23.910
Tim Trabon: That the short clubs, they put on a

1268
02:00:24.000 --> 02:00:25.590
Tim Trabon: Yeah, YouTube now.

1269
02:00:25.890 --> 02:00:26.370
Don Kilpatrick III: The real

1270
02:00:26.430 --> 02:00:27.390
With celebrities.

1271
02:00:30.150 --> 02:00:31.920
Tim Trabon: Five minutes celebrity interviews.

1272
02:00:36.060 --> 02:00:36.480
Yeah.

1273
02:00:39.450 --> 02:00:42.870
Tim Trabon: I remember when Conan, it's like the weird Late night show

1274
02:00:43.290 --> 02:00:44.040
Raymond Bonilla: Oh yeah, like

1275
02:00:44.100 --> 02:00:51.030
Raymond Bonilla: I like that. Does that look like it was like, just put together like a 30 seconds before the cameras went on.

1276
02:00:51.060 --> 02:00:54.300
Tim Trabon: Yeah, and people are just like this is

1277
02:00:54.330 --> 02:00:54.660
What

1278
02:00:56.730 --> 02:00:57.600
Raymond Bonilla: Somebody

1279
02:00:57.930 --> 02:01:06.990
Don Kilpatrick III: Gets are just crazy. Like when he went to a I think he went to a greyhound station late at night once was just randomly talking with people and

1280
02:01:08.070 --> 02:01:10.890
Don Kilpatrick III: Man like afraid for his life is pretty

1281
02:01:12.180 --> 02:01:17.670
Tim Trabon: Darn, I heard an interview where he talks about that he went to a city where people were trying to cancel the show.

1282
02:01:20.850 --> 02:01:24.420
Tim Trabon: And I'm trying to get wise. I'm trying to remember where they were.

1283
02:01:24.840 --> 02:01:26.340
Don Kilpatrick III: But you'd literally was you could tell he's

1284
02:01:26.340 --> 02:01:27.000
Tim Trabon: Going. Yeah.

1285
02:01:27.960 --> 02:01:33.090
Don Kilpatrick III: Because the guy who was like, and the guy was super like creepy. I was like, whoa, yeah.

1286
02:01:34.770 --> 02:01:37.980
Tim Trabon: Yeah, his, his show got banned by a local network.

1287
02:01:38.010 --> 02:01:42.750
Tim Trabon: That's what occurred. And so they went to that town to interview the people

1288
02:01:44.850 --> 02:01:48.240
Tim Trabon: Yeah, and everybody in the town hated County.

1289
02:01:50.190 --> 02:01:51.180
Tim Trabon: This really funny.

1290
02:01:51.510 --> 02:01:52.980
Tim Trabon: was great. They were like, yeah.

1291
02:01:54.270 --> 02:01:55.680
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, oh man.

1292
02:01:57.150 --> 02:02:02.190
Don Kilpatrick III: Well, you know, I was going to speak up earlier, but I have you guys seen black Narcissus

1293
02:02:02.970 --> 02:02:04.110
Dale Stephanos: No, no, it's

1294
02:02:04.140 --> 02:02:15.060
Don Kilpatrick III: It's, it's an older film you know it's gonna, I was going to try to bring it up with Chris. Chris recommended that I watched that movie years ago and I finally got around to watching it last night. It's

1295
02:02:16.200 --> 02:02:24.390
Don Kilpatrick III: You should definitely check it out. Looks like I don't know if it's HBO, I think, is doing a reboot of it as a series, but the original movie.

1296
02:02:24.930 --> 02:02:26.280
Don Kilpatrick III: Is beautifully shot.

1297
02:02:26.910 --> 02:02:29.250
John English: Was Chris mad at you when you made that suggestion was

1298
02:02:31.680 --> 02:02:34.830
John English: The title of that movie. It was thinking you should really watch this.

1299
02:02:35.370 --> 02:02:35.700
Yeah.

1300
02:02:36.930 --> 02:02:37.950
Raymond Bonilla: Perfect for you.

1301
02:02:38.880 --> 02:02:43.350
Don Kilpatrick III: Knowing the daylights out of me quit asking me what brush. I use. Yeah.

1302
02:02:45.060 --> 02:03:01.680
Don Kilpatrick III: No, he, he had it's really, it's shot like I think in 47 and some of the matte painting that's in that movie is just like you can just freeze frame that thing. And there's so many great compositions and it looks like just one big Dean Cornwell painting.

1303
02:03:02.970 --> 02:03:05.610
Don Kilpatrick III: Is you gotta check it out. It's

1304
02:03:05.640 --> 02:03:06.480
Raymond Bonilla: What's it called again.

1305
02:03:07.080 --> 02:03:14.640
Don Kilpatrick III: The lack of Narcissus block narcissistic. It's about an honoree up in like I think in the Himalayas or something.

1306
02:03:15.930 --> 02:03:20.280
John English: On Steve fuse makes a comment. And by the way, hello. Steve us hope you're doing

1307
02:03:20.280 --> 02:03:20.730
Yeah.

1308
02:03:22.860 --> 02:03:23.850
John English: Very good artist.

1309
02:03:25.590 --> 02:03:29.730
John English: There's some incredible matte paintings in that, in that, in that movie.

1310
02:03:30.270 --> 02:03:30.990
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, yeah.

1311
02:03:31.320 --> 02:03:32.700
Raymond Bonilla: I mean like narcissistic

1312
02:03:33.570 --> 02:03:45.750
Don Kilpatrick III: Yes, actually the beginning. One of the nuns is ringing the bell and they do a extreme three point perspective view almost eagle eye view straight town and that matte painting is just, Whoa.

1313
02:03:46.800 --> 02:03:55.620
Don Kilpatrick III: Insane. It's like, you know, it's at the same level of what Syd mead was doing and Blade Runner right when they're on top of the building. It's just

1314
02:03:56.850 --> 02:03:57.480
Insane.

1315
02:03:58.770 --> 02:04:04.260
Tim Trabon: Done. This is terrible. I, I accidentally stopped your video I did not mean to I clicked.

1316
02:04:05.370 --> 02:04:05.700
Tim Trabon: I mean,

1317
02:04:07.050 --> 02:04:07.890
Don Kilpatrick III: We're gonna haze.

1318
02:04:07.950 --> 02:04:08.820
Don Kilpatrick III: Ray and

1319
02:04:10.020 --> 02:04:11.250
Dale Stephanos: I make together one night.

1320
02:04:11.580 --> 02:04:12.750
Don Kilpatrick III: Only reason

1321
02:04:13.500 --> 02:04:18.300
Tim Trabon: I wanted to show everybody what goes out to night I was like in video

1322
02:04:20.400 --> 02:04:21.030
John English: I spill.

1323
02:04:21.180 --> 02:04:22.830
Dale Stephanos: Your laugh at his jokes.

1324
02:04:23.340 --> 02:04:26.940
Don Kilpatrick III: Fingers, like, yeah, I'm like, I'm like, Is any Richter any phases me

1325
02:04:29.100 --> 02:04:31.380
Tim Trabon: Done. It's the dynamic people love

1326
02:04:35.100 --> 02:04:39.300
Dale Stephanos: Who's the key. Now going Garrett Garry Shandling again, what's his name.

1327
02:04:40.230 --> 02:04:40.920
Tim Trabon: Garry Shandling

1328
02:04:41.190 --> 02:04:41.580
Dale Stephanos: Yeah.

1329
02:04:42.390 --> 02:04:42.900
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, yeah.

1330
02:04:43.380 --> 02:04:44.550
Tim Trabon: Oh yeah, let

1331
02:04:45.150 --> 02:04:45.780
Dale Stephanos: Me know

1332
02:04:48.630 --> 02:04:51.420
Dale Stephanos: He's got. It's a very well known actor

1333
02:04:53.550 --> 02:04:54.690
John English: Where's Chris when you need

1334
02:04:55.170 --> 02:04:57.270
Dale Stephanos: My God Oh

1335
02:04:59.010 --> 02:04:59.850
Dale Stephanos: Garry Shandling

1336
02:05:00.240 --> 02:05:01.740
Don Kilpatrick III: Do what movie or is

1337
02:05:01.980 --> 02:05:03.540
John English: Ed McMahon, no.

1338
02:05:04.560 --> 02:05:06.690
Tim Trabon: I just reading things from the audience.

1339
02:05:07.350 --> 02:05:09.660
Tim Trabon: I'm just reading things Jeffrey Tambor

1340
02:05:09.900 --> 02:05:10.830
Dale Stephanos: Jeffrey Tambor yeah

1341
02:05:10.950 --> 02:05:12.540
Tim Trabon: I was gonna say, I will just messing with

1342
02:05:12.810 --> 02:05:13.920
Bill Koeb: Jeffrey Tambor yeah

1343
02:05:14.220 --> 02:05:16.830
Tim Trabon: I was like, after I sent the second year, I was like,

1344
02:05:17.640 --> 02:05:20.670
Tim Trabon: Is the audience is going to see what, to me, it will say out loud.

1345
02:05:25.110 --> 02:05:25.320
Bill Koeb: Oh,

1346
02:05:25.680 --> 02:05:28.110
John English: So one of the rights. Fantastic.

1347
02:05:29.100 --> 02:05:33.240
Bill Koeb: Yeah, I like I'm happier with that one very handsome.

1348
02:05:34.740 --> 02:05:35.550
John English: Alright, so

1349
02:05:36.900 --> 02:05:38.460
John English: We're two minutes over, done.

1350
02:05:38.970 --> 02:05:40.590
Don Kilpatrick III: I'm good. Yeah, I just

1351
02:05:40.620 --> 02:05:41.160
Bill Koeb: was great.

1352
02:05:41.730 --> 02:05:43.680
Raymond Bonilla: It was awesome deal. Yeah, you've been

1353
02:05:45.240 --> 02:05:50.100
Bill Koeb: Willing to the to an image from the guys are talking about from black Narcissus

1354
02:05:51.150 --> 02:05:54.750
John English: So we're gonna we're gonna jump to another post here, but before we do

1355
02:05:55.800 --> 02:06:01.260
John English: I am going to share something real quickly, and I'm going to put Ray on the spot.

1356
02:06:03.930 --> 02:06:05.880
John English: Can you imagine that. Hey, man.

1357
02:06:06.030 --> 02:06:15.150
John English: Done you're teaching a class with us starting next week and we still have a spot or two left and say a couple words about your class.

1358
02:06:15.570 --> 02:06:28.200
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, thanks. JOHN yeah well my classes called painting the head from painted pixel are participating from pain to pixel. It's a a class that

1359
02:06:29.940 --> 02:06:44.670
Raymond Bonilla: Basically explores ways of approaching the painting ahead and pick a painting portraits and getting a likeness and how if you get you know how to basically apply

1360
02:06:45.540 --> 02:06:58.140
Raymond Bonilla: Teacher making practices to be using or paying ahead and multiple approaches and multiple mediums and and we talked a lot about how

1361
02:06:59.100 --> 02:07:12.270
Raymond Bonilla: To integrate those areas. And when we talk about structure of the head and talk about lighting and at the end we talked about basically taking the portrait and and applying it to, you know, something that could be either

1362
02:07:13.530 --> 02:07:20.310
Raymond Bonilla: You know family fantasy base of whatever genre genre you want and how to go about setting that up.

1363
02:07:21.360 --> 02:07:30.300
Raymond Bonilla: I think getting a likeness in the idea or the ability to get a likeness is something that's extremely important and as an illustrator.

1364
02:07:31.500 --> 02:07:46.470
Raymond Bonilla: And and even as an artist. I think you can you know what you learn from that you can apply in all other things is really sharpens your, your eye to see what why something looks the way it looks.

1365
02:07:47.490 --> 02:07:50.850
Raymond Bonilla: So I'm super excited and

1366
02:07:52.650 --> 02:07:54.810
John English: We still we got till Tuesday. Right.

1367
02:07:56.370 --> 02:07:56.670
Raymond Bonilla: But

1368
02:07:57.180 --> 02:07:57.690
Tim Trabon: Yes.

1369
02:07:57.750 --> 02:07:59.280
John English: You're going to do it. You gotta sign up

1370
02:08:00.660 --> 02:08:02.130
Dale Stephanos: I don't know that and

1371
02:08:02.160 --> 02:08:06.810
John English: Ray I'm really looking forward that for that I will be sneaking in there and listening.

1372
02:08:08.430 --> 02:08:11.370
Tim Trabon: Brett why we start doing the thing, if you call within the next

1373
02:08:11.400 --> 02:08:11.700
30

1374
02:08:13.650 --> 02:08:14.400
John English: You know, yeah.

1375
02:08:16.320 --> 02:08:23.670
John English: And then the next class above it is color theory class that brand watkinson speech teaches in it's spectacular.

1376
02:08:25.080 --> 02:08:26.970
John English: It that class.

1377
02:08:28.260 --> 02:08:34.470
John English: Every semester I go and sit in at least two or three of the of the classes and just can't leave. It's just

1378
02:08:34.710 --> 02:08:39.330
Tim Trabon: A really mean, honestly, sign up for all four yeah it's, yeah.

1379
02:08:39.390 --> 02:08:41.190
John English: Anyway grants class teaches you how to

1380
02:08:41.460 --> 02:08:50.280
John English: To apply color and breaks it down and really simple bites and words hundred understandable and digestible bites, I should say.

1381
02:08:51.840 --> 02:09:09.540
John English: The, the other two. I teach a foundations class and basics. What I think is the the most important aspects of structuring and picture and the simple, very simple process of putting pictures together. We start with a head drawing and then we go to

1382
02:09:11.100 --> 02:09:17.790
John English: A very simple explanation of how I teach figure drawing, which is the bottom class actually

1383
02:09:18.270 --> 02:09:30.750
John English: Which I'm teaching a full class of it at the first time and that's our the academy approach that was my father's approach to drawing the figure, which a lot of people have picked up on and and i know Francis

1384
02:09:31.800 --> 02:09:33.270
John English: Learned to do that and

1385
02:09:35.040 --> 02:09:48.630
John English: Obviously, Don learned to do it. And anybody that's gone to the Academy Dale I experimented with it. George Pratt took it took it upon himself to to kind of switch from line to seeing things and shake

1386
02:09:50.130 --> 02:09:55.770
John English: In it's a it's a very simple way to in a very different way to draw the figure.

1387
02:09:57.180 --> 02:10:02.550
John English: But that's what those are lining up, they all still have spots in them. And if you're if you're if you're interested, let us know. But

1388
02:10:04.320 --> 02:10:06.030
John English: In Timmy. Anything else to add to that.

1389
02:10:09.300 --> 02:10:09.960
John English: Timmy left

1390
02:10:10.350 --> 02:10:14.880
Tim Trabon: And just, I literally put my headphones on and I just heard you say, do you have anything else want to add to that.

1391
02:10:18.120 --> 02:10:19.020
Tim Trabon: I think we're good.

1392
02:10:19.110 --> 02:10:19.440
Tim Trabon: Okay.

1393
02:10:20.430 --> 02:10:24.420
John English: I'm going to stop sharing and then we're going to go to our fourth pose.

1394
02:10:26.370 --> 02:10:28.260
Tim Trabon: And it's, it is

1395
02:10:28.410 --> 02:10:29.460
John English: Dale Stefan us

1396
02:10:30.150 --> 02:10:30.810
Dale Stephanos: Well, what

1397
02:10:32.700 --> 02:10:34.320
John English: Oh, Dale. Dale. If you don't

1398
02:10:35.820 --> 02:10:36.450
John English: If you don't

1399
02:10:40.440 --> 02:10:41.310
John English: Make me drop

1400
02:10:41.820 --> 02:10:43.140
Raymond Bonilla: I can't hear you. JOHN you're

1401
02:10:43.140 --> 02:10:43.800
Raymond Bonilla: Bringing up

1402
02:10:44.430 --> 02:10:45.060
Raymond Bonilla: A tunnel.

1403
02:10:46.920 --> 02:10:47.580
Tim Trabon: Tunnel.

1404
02:10:48.960 --> 02:10:49.590
Tim Trabon: That's good.

1405
02:10:50.160 --> 02:10:50.850
Tim Trabon: That's good.

1406
02:11:00.570 --> 02:11:02.340
Tim Trabon: Is this thing is this thing.

1407
02:11:03.150 --> 02:11:03.420
Work.

1408
02:11:11.790 --> 02:11:16.380
Dale Stephanos: I'm so glad I didn't have to follow, Chris. Thank you, Don. Thanks for taking that bullet

1409
02:11:17.880 --> 02:11:19.080
Bill Koeb: out of focus there do

1410
02:11:19.170 --> 02:11:19.800
Tim Trabon: And dad.

1411
02:11:21.420 --> 02:11:21.990
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1412
02:11:23.970 --> 02:11:25.650
Tim Trabon: Let's say you're out of focus is on

1413
02:11:26.880 --> 02:11:27.360
Tim Trabon: A little bit.

1414
02:11:30.210 --> 02:11:31.980
Dale Stephanos: Better. That's good. Yeah.

1415
02:11:32.040 --> 02:11:35.850
Raymond Bonilla: It sounds trying to look he's trying to look youthful he's got a lot of Vaseline on the lens.

1416
02:11:37.320 --> 02:11:37.710
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1417
02:11:38.550 --> 02:11:39.960
Dale Stephanos: I live in soft focus

1418
02:11:39.960 --> 02:11:40.650
Yeah.

1419
02:11:43.560 --> 02:11:44.010
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1420
02:11:48.600 --> 02:11:51.960
Tim Trabon: Deal. It's your auto focus is grabbing your hand.

1421
02:11:52.350 --> 02:11:54.240
Tim Trabon: And really throwing it off. Yeah.

1422
02:11:54.450 --> 02:12:00.060
Tim Trabon: Hmm. And if you either can get the webcam closer. Damn, I fix it.

1423
02:12:01.980 --> 02:12:02.250
Dale Stephanos: Closer.

1424
02:12:02.970 --> 02:12:03.450
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1425
02:12:03.540 --> 02:12:06.810
Tim Trabon: But then I do realize that your head has to exist somewhere.

1426
02:12:06.990 --> 02:12:07.740
Dale Stephanos: Well, you know what

1427
02:12:07.770 --> 02:12:08.280
And

1428
02:12:09.330 --> 02:12:10.770
Dale Stephanos: heads are overrated.

1429
02:12:10.830 --> 02:12:19.890
Tim Trabon: Most D. Do you have a head strap maybe something they put on your forehead, and do you have you ever seen any Red Bull videos.

1430
02:12:20.940 --> 02:12:23.430
Tim Trabon: Does anybody. It's still grabbing it

1431
02:12:26.670 --> 02:12:27.060
Dale Stephanos: Hmm.

1432
02:12:30.360 --> 02:12:31.110
Tim Trabon: Let's see.

1433
02:12:32.580 --> 02:12:45.450
Tim Trabon: If you were to not put it so direct on see you have it right over the top of your work. If you're an angle with more it's going to be less off to the side it's going to have less

1434
02:12:47.370 --> 02:12:50.100
But that depth is can be less of an issue but

1435
02:12:55.680 --> 02:12:55.980
Dale Stephanos: Certainly.

1436
02:12:57.480 --> 02:12:57.750
Word.

1437
02:13:01.950 --> 02:13:05.820
Tim Trabon: It's, it's going to keep down. I'm sorry, it's going to keep doing it. Mm.

1438
02:13:06.450 --> 02:13:06.870
Hmm.

1439
02:13:08.520 --> 02:13:13.620
Dale Stephanos: All right, I don't know how to fix it outside of zoom. So it will. Oh yeah, I see, I see what you mean.

1440
02:13:16.560 --> 02:13:17.190
Speaker

1441
02:13:34.380 --> 02:13:34.710
Tim Trabon: Sorry.

1442
02:13:36.930 --> 02:13:37.470
Dale Stephanos: I'm sorry.

1443
02:13:39.510 --> 02:13:40.140
Dale Stephanos: More

1444
02:13:41.220 --> 02:13:43.890
Raymond Bonilla: I think I think claiming to me is appropriate in this time.

1445
02:13:45.390 --> 02:13:46.050
Dale Stephanos: Yeah what's up to

1446
02:13:49.290 --> 02:13:49.890
Don Kilpatrick III: Guess.

1447
02:13:51.600 --> 02:13:59.220
John English: I actually think this is done that's doing it because the opening line is saying, Hey, thank you for taking the bullet, you didn't want to follow.

1448
02:14:01.560 --> 02:14:04.050
John English: You know, Don, you know, he wanted to follow you.

1449
02:14:05.850 --> 02:14:06.330
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

1450
02:14:08.010 --> 02:14:08.460
Don Kilpatrick III: Man.

1451
02:14:08.520 --> 02:14:09.780
What are you trying to say. Dale.

1452
02:14:10.920 --> 02:14:11.880
Raymond Bonilla: Suspicious

1453
02:14:12.510 --> 02:14:14.010
Don Kilpatrick III: Hey, you know,

1454
02:14:15.120 --> 02:14:15.510
Dale Stephanos: What

1455
02:14:16.950 --> 02:14:19.590
John English: It's like, hey, I really like that frame.

1456
02:14:23.100 --> 02:14:28.500
Tim Trabon: So do we would either need you to turn off your auto focus, which are using a webcam.

1457
02:14:28.920 --> 02:14:31.260
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, I'm using a Logitech real. I don't know how to. Yes.

1458
02:14:31.920 --> 02:14:32.370
Yeah.

1459
02:14:34.920 --> 02:14:36.000
John English: It really want to drop

1460
02:14:38.520 --> 02:14:38.820
Dale Stephanos: Right.

1461
02:14:38.880 --> 02:14:46.770
Tim Trabon: Yeah, no, it's, it has to be through another software and usually requires you to restart your computer to download that software.

1462
02:14:47.640 --> 02:15:04.710
Tim Trabon: It's usually. It's usually a big commitment, if you, if you were to if you're to get your webcam. Here I've got my video going. So if you see this if you've got your. So imagine this right this is straight down.

1463
02:15:05.340 --> 02:15:06.240
Dale Stephanos: I can't see you.

1464
02:15:06.780 --> 02:15:07.320
Tim Trabon: You can't

1465
02:15:07.710 --> 02:15:08.970
Dale Stephanos: It doesn't matter. It doesn't matter.

1466
02:15:09.060 --> 02:15:09.480
Tim Trabon: Okay.

1467
02:15:09.570 --> 02:15:14.190
Dale Stephanos: That's not what this is about. So not I'm just gonna draw and

1468
02:15:16.080 --> 02:15:18.270
Dale Stephanos: It's going to look much better blurry. Anyway, so

1469
02:15:19.260 --> 02:15:19.710
Tim Trabon: Okay.

1470
02:15:20.280 --> 02:15:21.630
Raymond Bonilla: I don't notice a freaking out when you

1471
02:15:21.810 --> 02:15:24.030
Raymond Bonilla: Drive before though that's that's a weird thing.

1472
02:15:25.230 --> 02:15:25.650
Raymond Bonilla: Maybe

1473
02:15:26.250 --> 02:15:28.740
Dale Stephanos: Nothing changed so I'm

1474
02:15:28.800 --> 02:15:30.600
John English: Just little pressure does that

1475
02:15:31.080 --> 02:15:31.620
You got me.

1476
02:15:34.470 --> 02:15:36.540
Tim Trabon: Yeah, gone as a glitch switch

1477
02:15:36.840 --> 02:15:37.980
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, done. I mean,

1478
02:15:38.820 --> 02:15:39.750
Dale Stephanos: Don't get me out.

1479
02:15:40.290 --> 02:15:43.080
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, just man dunk last week, bro.

1480
02:15:47.010 --> 02:15:47.460
Tim Trabon: Man.

1481
02:15:49.170 --> 02:15:51.240
Dale Stephanos: Don't get any Detroit on. That's what it is.

1482
02:15:51.420 --> 02:15:52.200
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, you know,

1483
02:15:53.580 --> 02:15:54.600
Don Kilpatrick III: Some lessons with Troy.

1484
02:15:55.020 --> 02:15:57.870
Dale Stephanos: Don't, don't mess with Detroiters

1485
02:15:59.640 --> 02:16:02.130
Dale Stephanos: By way of Salt Lake City.

1486
02:16:04.980 --> 02:16:06.000
Don Kilpatrick III: Mean Streets.

1487
02:16:06.150 --> 02:16:06.690
Dale Stephanos: They will

1488
02:16:07.170 --> 02:16:09.090
Dale Stephanos: They will friendly you to death.

1489
02:16:11.730 --> 02:16:15.120
John English: Michigan. Michigan or Michigan. Michigan or

1490
02:16:15.180 --> 02:16:17.160
John English: wanders standards, I

1491
02:16:18.210 --> 02:16:24.990
John English: My wife was kept with during the election. My wife kept saying that to me because I was born in Detroit.

1492
02:16:25.710 --> 02:16:26.970
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh yeah, your mission Gander

1493
02:16:27.420 --> 02:16:28.200
John English: Misha Gander

1494
02:16:28.800 --> 02:16:32.370
John English: Yeah, that really bothered her. And for some reason, no one

1495
02:16:35.490 --> 02:16:35.730
Dale Stephanos: Was

1496
02:16:36.120 --> 02:16:38.310
Tim Trabon: On the topic of on the topic of Michigan.

1497
02:16:38.490 --> 02:16:43.200
Tim Trabon: The individual or dry Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Jefferson

1498
02:16:43.320 --> 02:16:51.180
Tim Trabon: Yes, one of the wildest parts of his story was so he was shot down over France and

1499
02:16:52.590 --> 02:16:56.220
Tim Trabon: The first voice, you know, the first thing you hear is from his

1500
02:16:57.570 --> 02:17:00.000
Tim Trabon: From he he had to

1501
02:17:00.780 --> 02:17:07.320
Tim Trabon: Scale, but he had to bail and he parachuted down at like 600 feet really low.

1502
02:17:08.430 --> 02:17:14.550
Tim Trabon: To bail out and then he's, he gets stuck in some trees and the first thing here is something in German.

1503
02:17:15.570 --> 02:17:15.990
Tim Trabon: And

1504
02:17:17.160 --> 02:17:23.310
Tim Trabon: His conversation begins with this German soldier who graduated from

1505
02:17:25.110 --> 02:17:26.790
Tim Trabon: Today, Michigan University.

1506
02:17:26.880 --> 02:17:28.440
John English: Yeah, Wayne University.

1507
02:17:28.890 --> 02:17:30.270
Dale Stephanos: Wow. Wow.

1508
02:17:31.800 --> 02:17:34.920
Don Kilpatrick III: University Michigan or Michigan State.

1509
02:17:35.580 --> 02:17:36.990
Tim Trabon: Did you say Wayne, or did you say

1510
02:17:37.080 --> 02:17:37.320
Tim Trabon: I was

1511
02:17:38.220 --> 02:17:39.780
John English: I thought it was weighing University.

1512
02:17:41.730 --> 02:17:42.210
Don Kilpatrick III: State.

1513
02:17:42.390 --> 02:17:44.490
John English: In Detroit, that might be it.

1514
02:17:44.940 --> 02:17:46.230
Tim Trabon: I thought it was Michigan State.

1515
02:17:46.380 --> 02:17:48.270
Tim Trabon: Good way anyway.

1516
02:17:49.530 --> 02:17:56.730
Tim Trabon: Michigan State. It was like just a fully surreal part of his story.

1517
02:17:58.260 --> 02:18:00.360
Tim Trabon: And then he was a POW for

1518
02:18:01.530 --> 02:18:03.390
Tim Trabon: A second extended period of time.

1519
02:18:04.560 --> 02:18:07.260
Tim Trabon: It sounded like for quite a while, but I

1520
02:18:08.430 --> 02:18:11.010
Tim Trabon: cannot recommend highly enough watching the documentary

1521
02:18:11.610 --> 02:18:12.360
It's awesome.

1522
02:18:14.520 --> 02:18:17.970
Don Kilpatrick III: I know you guys have mentioned that before. What's the name of the documentary again.

1523
02:18:18.390 --> 02:18:20.220
Tim Trabon: Um, it was, it was a

1524
02:18:21.390 --> 02:18:23.460
Tim Trabon: It was released earlier this year.

1525
02:18:24.810 --> 02:18:25.440
Tim Trabon: By the

1526
02:18:26.940 --> 02:18:28.500
Tim Trabon: Is it the Ford Foundation.

1527
02:18:29.550 --> 02:18:32.160
Tim Trabon: I posted illustrating their Facebook or

1528
02:18:33.240 --> 02:18:44.550
Tim Trabon: Any and it is it is a marked as an announcement. It's called our voices are stories to Tuskegee Airmen. Oh, it's really good. I'll grab I'm grabbing the link right now.

1529
02:18:49.920 --> 02:18:53.880
Tim Trabon: Just don't just don't leave this to go to back to save it.

1530
02:19:00.900 --> 02:19:02.760
Tim Trabon: Oh my god, people are leaving droves.

1531
02:19:13.980 --> 02:19:17.670
Raymond Bonilla: Once you're once you figure drawing a class.

1532
02:19:18.180 --> 02:19:18.810
John English: Wednesday night.

1533
02:19:20.010 --> 02:19:20.730
Raymond Bonilla: Sunday night.

1534
02:19:21.120 --> 02:19:24.930
Raymond Bonilla: Monday. Monday night, okay yeah what what time

1535
02:19:25.410 --> 02:19:28.980
John English: It's it starts at seven o'clock, your time.

1536
02:19:31.590 --> 02:19:34.080
Raymond Bonilla: My definitely need to drop in because I

1537
02:19:35.820 --> 02:19:41.220
John English: You know, we talked about you coming into Sterling's at night just coming to mind because I forgot I was doing my

1538
02:19:41.760 --> 02:19:42.120
Okay.

1539
02:19:45.240 --> 02:19:46.680
John English: Because I'm not going to be with Sterling.

1540
02:19:47.670 --> 02:19:48.450
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, that's right.

1541
02:19:48.750 --> 02:19:53.040
Raymond Bonilla: That's right. Yeah, sounds great. That's great. I would love to do that. Yeah, that

1542
02:19:55.110 --> 02:19:56.550
Raymond Bonilla: I've been. I've been meaning to

1543
02:19:58.410 --> 02:20:00.870
Raymond Bonilla: I've been secretly wanting to get back into the past.

1544
02:20:03.810 --> 02:20:07.200
Raymond Bonilla: So I think this would be a nice nice way to do that.

1545
02:20:15.000 --> 02:20:20.730
Raymond Bonilla: Meet him. I kind of wish I had right now to do at this portrait. It's kind of like almost made for it.

1546
02:20:27.270 --> 02:20:28.890
Don Kilpatrick III: Hey Bill. Are you using new pastel

1547
02:20:29.430 --> 02:20:29.910
Yeah.

1548
02:20:32.580 --> 02:20:50.760
Don Kilpatrick III: So, you know, I did a little bit of pastel when I was at the academy and i've i've i've just kind of yeah I mean it's intriguing ME TO RE. I wanted to do more of it, but I know there's definitely a big, it seems like there's a big line between like he's using ram brand or the soccer command.

1549
02:20:51.180 --> 02:20:51.960
Raymond Bonilla: Right He's

1550
02:20:52.110 --> 02:21:03.780
Don Kilpatrick III: The new pastel IDs, but those, for example, he's all about, you know, the soccer Peppino the soccer Costco is a reason why you use new pastels have a softer one

1551
02:21:04.350 --> 02:21:10.980
Bill Koeb: Um, I, I feel like I have more control over it because it's a little harder. Oh, cool. And I can be heavy handed

1552
02:21:13.980 --> 02:21:15.780
Raymond Bonilla: With soft pastel it's like it'll just

1553
02:21:16.200 --> 02:21:18.390
John English: Dance it's it's way too reactive

1554
02:21:19.440 --> 02:21:20.040
Bill Koeb: Just kind of

1555
02:21:21.210 --> 02:21:24.120
Bill Koeb: Crowd I also like the side, the new pastels to

1556
02:21:26.160 --> 02:21:26.520
Don Kilpatrick III: Have any

1557
02:21:27.900 --> 02:21:29.520
Bill Koeb: Skills have been bigger steps.

1558
02:21:31.680 --> 02:21:35.580
Don Kilpatrick III: To just get more for you just to last longer. Just get more for what you're

1559
02:21:37.770 --> 02:21:43.440
Tim Trabon: Using. Here's a question from the crowd for Dale. Dale whatever's happened. Your it's working. So

1560
02:21:43.770 --> 02:21:47.220
Tim Trabon: Okay, kind of just don't move.

1561
02:21:49.350 --> 02:21:54.600
Tim Trabon: Somebody just asked. Now Eric, I just asked Dale. What's the story behind the crop face sheet.

1562
02:21:56.340 --> 02:21:57.390
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I was noticing that

1563
02:21:58.020 --> 02:22:04.440
Raymond Bonilla: The one that the skull and to the left of your mini skull is like a crop of these like

1564
02:22:04.530 --> 02:22:07.380
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, I was afraid to ask.

1565
02:22:07.890 --> 02:22:11.280
Dale Stephanos: This is phone. So if I'm on the phone.

1566
02:22:12.840 --> 02:22:14.610
Dale Stephanos: You know, I'll draw on whatever

1567
02:22:15.960 --> 02:22:16.980
Raymond Bonilla: Oh cool, I'm

1568
02:22:16.980 --> 02:22:18.390
Dale Stephanos: So there's not a better story.

1569
02:22:18.600 --> 02:22:22.170
Tim Trabon: Yeah, no, no good story. Everybody take now.

1570
02:22:22.680 --> 02:22:22.980
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1571
02:22:23.670 --> 02:22:26.640
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. So whenever you don't talk to the deal on the phone.

1572
02:22:26.910 --> 02:22:28.500
Tim Trabon: Oh, I was gonna say draw

1573
02:22:29.760 --> 02:22:30.930
Tim Trabon: So when you're on the phone.

1574
02:22:31.830 --> 02:22:33.750
Dale Stephanos: Saying don't have to draw anymore.

1575
02:22:36.450 --> 02:22:37.680
Raymond Bonilla: So many called Dale.

1576
02:22:38.760 --> 02:22:39.660
John English: Someone column.

1577
02:22:39.990 --> 02:22:40.620
Dale Stephanos: Yeah. Maybe he'll

1578
02:22:40.710 --> 02:22:41.910
Dale Stephanos: Maybe he'll draw something good.

1579
02:22:49.410 --> 02:22:54.180
Raymond Bonilla: I just realized we totally did an answer. And he did we answer that question. I just realized

1580
02:22:54.390 --> 02:22:55.290
Dale Stephanos: I did, yeah. They're just

1581
02:22:56.130 --> 02:22:57.150
Dale Stephanos: It's, it's just

1582
02:22:58.260 --> 02:23:01.740
Dale Stephanos: I think there was a magazine here and I was just doodling basically

1583
02:23:02.280 --> 02:23:02.820
Awesome.

1584
02:23:04.530 --> 02:23:07.110
Dale Stephanos: I didn't know that was visible. I'll have to clean up my skull.

1585
02:23:07.740 --> 02:23:13.680
Tim Trabon: No, I was gonna say nobody asks about the tiny, tiny little school UK but

1586
02:23:13.710 --> 02:23:17.700
Raymond Bonilla: I was loving it was like the working. It was like we're in your studio here.

1587
02:23:17.940 --> 02:23:18.450
We go.

1588
02:23:20.790 --> 02:23:24.210
Dale Stephanos: Hey, does anybody know the the illustrator Thomas air, it's been

1589
02:23:25.650 --> 02:23:26.100
Don Kilpatrick III: Something so

1590
02:23:26.370 --> 02:23:28.110
Raymond Bonilla: Yes, yes, absolutely.

1591
02:23:28.530 --> 02:23:29.910
Dale Stephanos: Re you know his work.

1592
02:23:30.330 --> 02:23:31.230
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

1593
02:23:31.350 --> 02:23:35.760
Dale Stephanos: So I ordered. He put out, he just put together a book of his drawings and

1594
02:23:36.480 --> 02:23:37.710
Raymond Bonilla: We did. Wow.

1595
02:23:38.190 --> 02:23:38.640
And

1596
02:23:39.930 --> 02:23:41.010
Dale Stephanos: Can you see this

1597
02:23:42.450 --> 02:23:43.020
Dale Stephanos: So,

1598
02:23:43.200 --> 02:23:50.070
Dale Stephanos: I opened it up. And this isn't here. And I'm like, that sure does look feel and tastes like a real painting.

1599
02:23:50.130 --> 02:23:51.000
Raymond Bonilla: Is that a painting.

1600
02:23:51.180 --> 02:23:53.160
Raymond Bonilla: Yes, oh my

1601
02:23:53.190 --> 02:23:58.620
Dale Stephanos: God right and it is stunning. I mean, I don't know how it looks on camera but

1602
02:23:58.650 --> 02:24:00.390
Raymond Bonilla: It is. It looks incredible.

1603
02:24:00.570 --> 02:24:01.680
Dale Stephanos: Yes, he

1604
02:24:01.770 --> 02:24:03.300
Raymond Bonilla: Is that, is that an acrylic painting.

1605
02:24:03.420 --> 02:24:05.130
Dale Stephanos: Yes, I don't know.

1606
02:24:05.160 --> 02:24:06.090
Raymond Bonilla: Man, how does he

1607
02:24:07.680 --> 02:24:11.580
Dale Stephanos: Want to know to October, but man.

1608
02:24:11.970 --> 02:24:19.380
Dale Stephanos: Wow. Yeah. I was like, do I messaged him. I like, um, do you need more money or

1609
02:24:20.490 --> 02:24:23.490
Dale Stephanos: And he said, you know, that's my gift to you. I was like, okay.

1610
02:24:25.020 --> 02:24:25.770
Raymond Bonilla: Wow.

1611
02:24:26.580 --> 02:24:27.390
Dale Stephanos: Also have

1612
02:24:27.480 --> 02:24:28.590
Dale Stephanos: Friends who are artists.

1613
02:24:29.790 --> 02:24:30.870
Bill Koeb: I didn't catch his name.

1614
02:24:31.440 --> 02:24:33.840
Dale Stephanos: Thomas Erickson really phenomenal.

1615
02:24:33.870 --> 02:24:36.510
Raymond Bonilla: It's Allah. I'll see if I can text it

1616
02:24:36.660 --> 02:24:37.440
Bill Koeb: Very cool.

1617
02:24:38.880 --> 02:24:50.730
Tim Trabon: I'm going to give a note to the audience at the end of the night, we always go through social and check out work and so please be sharing, sharing your work tonight, please.

1618
02:24:52.950 --> 02:25:05.370
Tim Trabon: But I do you have some bad news for whatever reason john and I in our region still Instagram will not let us look at hashtags.

1619
02:25:06.090 --> 02:25:16.380
Tim Trabon: Because because of the election. They think that apparently john and I as Kansans of Missourians

1620
02:25:18.900 --> 02:25:22.500
Tim Trabon: But yes, it seems that they believe we could very easily both be do

1621
02:25:24.660 --> 02:25:25.440
John English: I think it's both.

1622
02:25:25.590 --> 02:25:29.670
John English: That we both have we've shared emails with Bilson cabbage.

1623
02:25:35.580 --> 02:25:36.840
Raymond Bonilla: Say the repos. Good.

1624
02:25:37.260 --> 02:25:43.470
Tim Trabon: Now, but for whatever I can't look at any hashtags, it blocks all of my hashtags drives me nuts.

1625
02:25:44.670 --> 02:25:45.690
Tim Trabon: Erica Yeah, not

1626
02:25:46.440 --> 02:25:50.550
Tim Trabon: As if I am a child, they said, you can't have hashtags anymore.

1627
02:25:52.890 --> 02:25:55.470
Tim Trabon: We're at time out so

1628
02:25:56.730 --> 02:25:59.040
John English: What we'll be doing will be looking at Facebook later.

1629
02:25:59.250 --> 02:26:03.300
Tim Trabon: Yeah, so do I get a Facebook so poignant story is, please post your work to Facebook.

1630
02:26:04.890 --> 02:26:13.650
Tim Trabon: They'll post it on Instagram, because other people can see it. It's totally regional that like, I'm pretty sure most people can still see it so

1631
02:26:14.580 --> 02:26:21.600
Dale Stephanos: So, wait a minute. So you guys. You're not allowed. You can't literally can't look at hashtags. You can't search for hashtags, they

1632
02:26:21.600 --> 02:26:32.820
Tim Trabon: Just tell us not to we follow the rules, Dale now. No, you're right down. Sorry, I was being cryptic that they just block it. It just read it to you. I read

1633
02:26:34.350 --> 02:26:35.400
Tim Trabon: When it says

1634
02:26:36.780 --> 02:26:41.430
Tim Trabon: I mean, unfortunately, it's because of the spread of outrageous.

1635
02:26:42.450 --> 02:26:43.800
Like false information.

1636
02:26:46.380 --> 02:26:46.770
But

1637
02:26:48.330 --> 02:26:49.590
Bill Koeb: Let me see here.

1638
02:26:50.280 --> 02:26:53.670
John English: I've warned me so many times. And he just does not listen

1639
02:26:54.900 --> 02:26:58.950
John English: He says cooperation of awful.

1640
02:27:02.340 --> 02:27:10.710
Tim Trabon: Says recent posts from all hashtags are temporarily hidden to help prevent the spread of possible possible false information.

1641
02:27:11.820 --> 02:27:13.260
Tim Trabon: Related to the election.

1642
02:27:16.260 --> 02:27:17.250
Dale Stephanos: Well, yeah.

1643
02:27:17.280 --> 02:27:19.080
Raymond Bonilla: Wow, I haven't

1644
02:27:19.770 --> 02:27:20.280
Raymond Bonilla: Heard of him.

1645
02:27:20.760 --> 02:27:24.480
Tim Trabon: It sounds like Don part you're gonna have to check to because it says

1646
02:27:26.220 --> 02:27:28.860
Tim Trabon: Somebody just said it's in Michigan, so

1647
02:27:29.100 --> 02:27:29.730
Don Kilpatrick III: Really I

1648
02:27:30.930 --> 02:27:35.130
Don Kilpatrick III: Kind of make some time, but I haven't really been on a lot. The last couple days so

1649
02:27:36.990 --> 02:27:45.390
Tim Trabon: Some somebody said, I didn't know that they could do that. And my answer would be, they don't have any rules.

1650
02:27:48.420 --> 02:27:50.670
Tim Trabon: They also there's no precedent.

1651
02:27:52.680 --> 02:27:53.190
Tim Trabon: You know,

1652
02:27:55.230 --> 02:27:57.300
Tim Trabon: They're like, Wait, I didn't know you couldn't do that.

1653
02:28:02.280 --> 02:28:05.550
Dale Stephanos: Well, my, my attitude is always yeah

1654
02:28:07.260 --> 02:28:09.120
Dale Stephanos: What am I gonna do get my money back.

1655
02:28:10.200 --> 02:28:10.770
Tim Trabon: Oh, yeah.

1656
02:28:11.040 --> 02:28:13.050
Tim Trabon: You know now. Yeah.

1657
02:28:14.490 --> 02:28:34.530
Tim Trabon: Well, I, but I find it interesting. It's like, you know, the largest property rental organization in the world right now doesn't own any property Airbnb largest transit largest largest transportation company doesn't own any cars Hoover.

1658
02:28:35.760 --> 02:28:42.870
Tim Trabon: Largest media company don't actually own any media but we we produce all reform. I mean, how interesting is that

1659
02:28:43.260 --> 02:28:45.060
Dale Stephanos: That's amazing. Yeah.

1660
02:28:48.960 --> 02:28:50.640
Tim Trabon: I don't know what to do with that information.

1661
02:28:51.660 --> 02:28:53.340
Dale Stephanos: Well, you just, you know, to me, just

1662
02:28:53.370 --> 02:28:57.000
Dale Stephanos: Boom lines. That's all I just, Whoa, whoa, whoa.

1663
02:28:58.830 --> 02:28:59.940
Dale Stephanos: Tell us more to me.

1664
02:29:00.900 --> 02:29:01.260
Yeah.

1665
02:29:02.670 --> 02:29:03.300
Tim Trabon: I like to think

1666
02:29:03.450 --> 02:29:04.560
Raymond Bonilla: That bomb you dropped

1667
02:29:04.740 --> 02:29:08.010
Raymond Bonilla: Out of corrected a camera work.

1668
02:29:08.040 --> 02:29:09.120
Tim Trabon: Yeah. Wow.

1669
02:29:12.150 --> 02:29:13.470
Tim Trabon: Mind blown.

1670
02:29:15.570 --> 02:29:17.400
John English: I mean, it means the sage of

1671
02:29:18.930 --> 02:29:20.280
John English: The illustration isolation.

1672
02:29:20.760 --> 02:29:22.980
Tim Trabon: I like to think of myself as

1673
02:29:23.640 --> 02:29:24.870
John English: The wise sage.

1674
02:29:24.990 --> 02:29:25.320
Tim Trabon: This

1675
02:29:25.440 --> 02:29:26.160
Tim Trabon: Is Steve.

1676
02:29:26.220 --> 02:29:29.010
Tim Trabon: The Steve Jobs of free drying nights.

1677
02:29:30.840 --> 02:29:31.980
Dale Stephanos: I think you're more of a

1678
02:29:33.030 --> 02:29:34.020
Tim Trabon: Was Nick.

1679
02:29:34.680 --> 02:29:35.430
Dale Stephanos: No, no, no.

1680
02:29:36.720 --> 02:29:38.340
Dale Stephanos: invented anything for like

1681
02:29:39.660 --> 02:29:42.510
Dale Stephanos: A Teller. So, no, no.

1682
02:29:42.600 --> 02:29:43.440
Tim Trabon: No Teller

1683
02:29:45.780 --> 02:29:48.390
Dale Stephanos: Yeah. What a Malcolm Gladwell, but like a like a

1684
02:29:49.200 --> 02:29:51.810
Tim Trabon: Like a poor, poor man's Malcolm Gladwell.

1685
02:29:52.140 --> 02:29:55.200
Dale Stephanos: Like well really poor man's Julie.

1686
02:29:56.610 --> 02:29:59.580
Tim Trabon: Like, like, like box house.

1687
02:29:59.760 --> 02:30:00.420
Dale Stephanos: Did

1688
02:30:00.600 --> 02:30:01.470
Tim Trabon: You know, I did.

1689
02:30:05.820 --> 02:30:07.980
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I think you. I like to see

1690
02:30:08.700 --> 02:30:09.360
Tim Trabon: Now, yeah.

1691
02:30:10.590 --> 02:30:11.970
Tim Trabon: Thank you that

1692
02:30:12.630 --> 02:30:13.440
means a lot.

1693
02:30:16.650 --> 02:30:18.300
Dale Stephanos: It's still a lot closer than me so

1694
02:30:18.630 --> 02:30:21.360
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I think this. Yeah.

1695
02:30:21.870 --> 02:30:26.370
Tim Trabon: Yeah but yeah but Dale can do you can shred so

1696
02:30:27.630 --> 02:30:28.110
Tim Trabon: Fortunately,

1697
02:30:29.640 --> 02:30:31.500
Dale Stephanos: I could, at one time, not anymore.

1698
02:30:32.940 --> 02:30:45.000
Tim Trabon: Somebody said the Yoda illustration isolate, I would say only that because my hair is on track and we we identify with his height so

1699
02:30:46.920 --> 02:30:48.960
Tim Trabon: Same Hair and Body type

1700
02:30:50.700 --> 02:30:54.000
Raymond Bonilla: I thought you said Steve Jobs because you yell at people a lot

1701
02:30:54.210 --> 02:30:59.100
Tim Trabon: No, I'm saying that. No, I was saying, somebody said, Honestly the Yoda know

1702
02:31:02.640 --> 02:31:05.850
Tim Trabon: Now i don't i don't yell quite as much as Steve Jobs did

1703
02:31:07.350 --> 02:31:12.240
Raymond Bonilla: You aren't really cryptic, you know, in whenever you're trying to instruct us on something so

1704
02:31:12.750 --> 02:31:17.640
Tim Trabon: I do find myself. I do find myself posing kind of with my my assistant GM

1705
02:31:17.760 --> 02:31:19.200
Tim Trabon: Information quake.

1706
02:31:22.650 --> 02:31:23.670
Don Kilpatrick III: Total mixing going

1707
02:31:25.800 --> 02:31:31.050
Tim Trabon: If I bought. If I bought everybody visual arts passage turtlenecks

1708
02:31:31.380 --> 02:31:32.010
Dale Stephanos: Oh, wow.

1709
02:31:32.910 --> 02:31:34.350
Tim Trabon: Would that sell you think

1710
02:31:34.410 --> 02:31:36.810
Dale Stephanos: What is this not like Tim is little cult.

1711
02:31:37.170 --> 02:31:37.740
Yeah.

1712
02:31:39.060 --> 02:31:41.100
Tim Trabon: I just want everybody to dress like me.

1713
02:31:43.740 --> 02:31:48.270
John English: That actually would be funny to do you know we talked about T shirts, we should do turtlenecks

1714
02:31:48.330 --> 02:31:49.860
Tim Trabon: turtlenecks be great.

1715
02:31:53.010 --> 02:31:53.610
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1716
02:31:53.790 --> 02:31:54.510
John English: It'll be different.

1717
02:31:58.680 --> 02:32:01.920
Dale Stephanos: Hey Ray I saw you, you were talking about.

1718
02:32:04.620 --> 02:32:06.930
Dale Stephanos: Toss black shears video

1719
02:32:07.380 --> 02:32:09.900
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, like I was watching that.

1720
02:32:10.950 --> 02:32:21.060
Dale Stephanos: First of all, the one, not the Mark Twain. One is that Ken. Ken Norton, or is it, is it a boxer they did the, the African American guy.

1721
02:32:21.570 --> 02:32:22.320
Raymond Bonilla: Joe Lewis.

1722
02:32:22.590 --> 02:32:23.730
Dale Stephanos: Oh, is it Joe Louis

1723
02:32:24.810 --> 02:32:25.440
Raymond Bonilla: Which one

1724
02:32:26.490 --> 02:32:29.790
Dale Stephanos: Looks like a box or is it the towel around his waist.

1725
02:32:31.320 --> 02:32:32.070
Raymond Bonilla: Oh,

1726
02:32:33.870 --> 02:32:36.870
Raymond Bonilla: No, I don't know. Yeah, the head, but

1727
02:32:39.690 --> 02:32:43.500
Dale Stephanos: I watched that. And then, do you know the painter Daniels brick.

1728
02:32:44.100 --> 02:32:45.750
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, oh yeah, totally.

1729
02:32:46.080 --> 02:32:48.360
Dale Stephanos: I saw something he did as well and

1730
02:32:50.310 --> 02:33:06.030
Dale Stephanos: Black shears video is like an hour long and he just busts out this mind blowing. You know version of of a Golden Age illustration portrait, you know, the quash pick out and all that stuff.

1731
02:33:06.420 --> 02:33:08.550
Dale Stephanos: just mind blowing. You know, like

1732
02:33:09.000 --> 02:33:09.450
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1733
02:33:09.660 --> 02:33:18.270
Dale Stephanos: You know, suddenly it's alive and I love, I love Daniels bricks work, but I'm one I just watch it while I while I

1734
02:33:19.290 --> 02:33:20.700
Dale Stephanos: Just do other things and

1735
02:33:21.810 --> 02:33:23.040
Raymond Bonilla: This brick have a video.

1736
02:33:23.640 --> 02:33:24.870
Dale Stephanos: What's that, yeah. Yes.

1737
02:33:25.320 --> 02:33:26.760
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, I didn't know that. Okay. Yeah.

1738
02:33:26.880 --> 02:33:31.560
Dale Stephanos: I'm and I'm on like our three and we're still blocking in the head.

1739
02:33:32.310 --> 02:33:32.910
Dale Stephanos: You know what I mean.

1740
02:33:34.050 --> 02:33:37.020
Dale Stephanos: I know what its gonna look like it's going to be mind blowing, but

1741
02:33:37.470 --> 02:33:38.520
Raymond Bonilla: Right. Great.

1742
02:33:38.610 --> 02:33:49.050
Dale Stephanos: Talk about what a real professional Illustrator can just bang out, you know, here, here. Here's this material. What can you do you know what I mean.

1743
02:33:49.170 --> 02:33:52.770
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. Just, just an unbelievable.

1744
02:33:53.790 --> 02:33:55.500
Raymond Bonilla: Facility with things and it's just

1745
02:33:57.300 --> 02:33:58.020
Raymond Bonilla: It's just

1746
02:33:59.460 --> 02:34:01.260
Raymond Bonilla: I don't know how to describe it like it's like

1747
02:34:02.430 --> 02:34:19.230
Raymond Bonilla: He, he's got such a just ESPECIALLY WITH, LIKE, WASH pick out one. It's like like controlling chaos, you know, in a way that he it's it's almost like he's just constantly like illustrators just are in constant motion. And so it's like, how do you keep moving.

1748
02:34:19.920 --> 02:34:20.460
Raymond Bonilla: And

1749
02:34:21.180 --> 02:34:26.760
Raymond Bonilla: And hope for the best. And make sure that you're going in towards the direction of a finish, you know,

1750
02:34:28.350 --> 02:34:37.680
Dale Stephanos: It just, it just, I was just really struck by, you know, I know this is the fine art thing. It's going to look fantastic. It's amazing, but

1751
02:34:39.270 --> 02:34:39.720
You know,

1752
02:34:40.740 --> 02:34:41.550
Raymond Bonilla: just busting out

1753
02:34:42.000 --> 02:34:47.910
Raymond Bonilla: An hour. Yeah, you could see like his the process to have you seen the process one yet.

1754
02:34:49.590 --> 02:34:51.870
Dale Stephanos: I don't know what's the who's the subject. What's the

1755
02:34:52.320 --> 02:34:57.390
Raymond Bonilla: It's that he takes he goes through his sketches and how he does references and how he does like

1756
02:34:57.510 --> 02:34:58.560
Dale Stephanos: Oh, no, no.

1757
02:34:59.670 --> 02:35:06.960
Raymond Bonilla: It's it's it's it's incredible. And it's like, it's I think it's my favorite out of the group.

1758
02:35:07.980 --> 02:35:27.720
Raymond Bonilla: I love all the videos, but I think the process when it's like, wow, and he just he's doing that. Like, he will he ends it by doing like an acrylic under painting and like the way he's describing stuff. I'm like, oh, he's literally doing a 19th century color lion and he bush like it's

1759
02:35:28.290 --> 02:35:33.210
Raymond Bonilla: Literally, the same thing and and and the finish is like super refined

1760
02:35:34.260 --> 02:35:46.530
Raymond Bonilla: Each shows like pictures after like after he finished it off and he's working on to these types of images at the same time. And he's got like three other in the background it, man. It's just like a machine, you know, and

1761
02:35:47.970 --> 02:35:56.700
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I think it's like it's a testament to kind of like the different types of training that certain artists go through, because I know like I know a lot of fine artists and they

1762
02:35:57.240 --> 02:36:12.360
Raymond Bonilla: They'll spend on Mon fun just setting something up, you know, like a, like just a still life center. Yeah. And yeah, it's, I'm sure. Daniel Smith was probably working fairly fast for his speed.

1763
02:36:12.390 --> 02:36:13.200
Dale Stephanos: You know, for him, I

1764
02:36:13.620 --> 02:36:18.450
Dale Stephanos: Think so. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And I thought about Chris too and just, you know,

1765
02:36:20.670 --> 02:36:30.450
Dale Stephanos: It's just amazing what what some of these guys are able to achieve in such a short amount of time really just because of years of having to meet a deadline.

1766
02:36:31.020 --> 02:36:37.380
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. No, it's, it's true. It's like a really just as kind of focused

1767
02:36:39.540 --> 02:36:49.890
Raymond Bonilla: Focused energy. You know, it said the focused endeavor that they have, they don't. They just, they have to have like a mind as a little straight. It's almost like you have that have your

1768
02:36:50.970 --> 02:36:57.780
Raymond Bonilla: Before you start to finish your, your, you have to have a finished view of the the picture in your head.

1769
02:36:58.050 --> 02:36:59.400
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, you can see it. Yeah.

1770
02:36:59.820 --> 02:37:05.610
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and that's what like laxer he's, he talks about, like, you know, cuz he's basically just doing this for like

1771
02:37:06.570 --> 02:37:16.170
Raymond Bonilla: He's talking about his stuff and he's, you know, doing western art now and and and he's like talking about all the preliminaries that he does and

1772
02:37:16.710 --> 02:37:28.110
Raymond Bonilla: Why it goes to it. And then he says, you know, he says, I only have I don't have a lot of time. So my end any credits is illustration careers like I was an illustrator.

1773
02:37:28.890 --> 02:37:39.840
Raymond Bonilla: For you know 14 years and I and I had to do at deadlines and like I couldn't waste time. I didn't have enough time. If something didn't work out to start over, and that's

1774
02:37:40.980 --> 02:37:50.880
Raymond Bonilla: And so like that attitude like he says, so if if it's if it's going to be finished. If it's going to the board before it goes to the board I it's got to be worth it for me.

1775
02:37:51.960 --> 02:37:53.490
Raymond Bonilla: Right, yeah. And

1776
02:37:54.690 --> 02:37:55.560
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, it's a

1777
02:37:55.800 --> 02:37:58.050
Raymond Bonilla: It made me feel maybe really

1778
02:37:58.650 --> 02:38:01.920
Raymond Bonilla: Like I didn't that I need to do more of that, you know,

1779
02:38:02.550 --> 02:38:09.480
John English: Ray, remember what he said in the demo that he did for us is some of his, his imagery. He dreamed it

1780
02:38:10.320 --> 02:38:10.920
Dale Stephanos: Oh, yeah.

1781
02:38:11.040 --> 02:38:12.360
John English: We're talking about that. That's just

1782
02:38:12.390 --> 02:38:13.290
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, right.

1783
02:38:13.710 --> 02:38:26.010
John English: Yeah, and I, I, I mean, walking going through. We went through drawers and drawers and drawers stacks of studies and things he all the way back to college that he had done.

1784
02:38:28.050 --> 02:38:33.420
John English: I mean, he went through a lot of those steps because he went to Chicago Art Institute.

1785
02:38:34.320 --> 02:38:38.790
John English: And he went through a lot of the steps that you're talking about in development.

1786
02:38:40.140 --> 02:38:46.590
John English: And you know he approaches, he can approach in a really academic way.

1787
02:38:47.880 --> 02:38:50.430
John English: But he he seems to put it aside.

1788
02:38:52.200 --> 02:38:54.660
John English: You know, to get someplace fast, but he

1789
02:38:55.200 --> 02:38:56.490
John English: He reverts back to it.

1790
02:38:56.550 --> 02:38:58.200
John English: I mean, he'll go back to that and

1791
02:38:59.880 --> 02:39:08.430
John English: Which I think is really cool, you know, he'll go back and, you know, start things like you know the demo, we did for us, you know, just a brief alla Prima pain.

1792
02:39:10.560 --> 02:39:22.290
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. And yeah, and he's it's, it's, I went after look look that I remember that talk. And I remember just walking away and telling

1793
02:39:22.860 --> 02:39:33.150
Raymond Bonilla: after the talk. I told I was still talking to Tyler Jacobson was was there and he was first thing I said to him, I'm like, man, that is an artist. Artists if I've ever

1794
02:39:34.620 --> 02:39:37.200
Raymond Bonilla: You know came across one like that is someone who's like

1795
02:39:38.610 --> 02:39:39.960
Raymond Bonilla: He's an artist artist. It's like

1796
02:39:41.040 --> 02:39:52.320
Raymond Bonilla: It's a laying down on kind of the craft in like in the same way, like Chris's. It's like the that process of like you see them working through something and it's like, wow, this is

1797
02:39:53.880 --> 02:39:56.400
Raymond Bonilla: You know, this doesn't happen by accident, you know,

1798
02:39:57.540 --> 02:40:05.760
Raymond Bonilla: And that's what I like. Thomas's like just like you're saying stacks and stacks of preliminaries and stuff. And I've heard the stories I've heard legends of all this stuff would like

1799
02:40:06.300 --> 02:40:22.410
Raymond Bonilla: To see him go through them and and to have just a video dedicated to that. I mean, that's, it's really impressive. And it really kind of makes me think like okay well what am I doing to make make my endeavor, you know, worth it, you know.

1800
02:40:23.550 --> 02:40:24.630
Raymond Bonilla: For me, because

1801
02:40:26.400 --> 02:40:31.140
Raymond Bonilla: I think that it just goes to show you that this stuff doesn't happen by accident, you know,

1802
02:40:33.390 --> 02:40:41.730
Raymond Bonilla: It's great for students because it shows them that like it, you know, Thomas Fletcher, who has been. I mean, how, how this blackshear

1803
02:40:43.770 --> 02:40:44.580
John English: I think he's

1804
02:40:45.750 --> 02:40:46.620
John English: 65

1805
02:40:47.340 --> 02:41:03.090
Raymond Bonilla: Okay, so he's 65 years old and he still going through that process a you know a thumb nailing reference collection doing studies pushing as reference combining multiple references doing color studies, you know,

1806
02:41:04.320 --> 02:41:18.540
Raymond Bonilla: Laying in this picture. Think transferring the drawing properly, you know, like all of these things. He doesn't have to go through that if he doesn't, if he doesn't want to, but he's he's. It's like the only way he says it's, that's the way he feels about his artwork, you know,

1807
02:41:20.910 --> 02:41:35.670
Raymond Bonilla: And you know, it's like, well, if it's good enough for Thomas black shirts, obviously, you know, probably should be good enough for me. You know, but my do. It's like that's a I should I should say like to wrap around with Dale what you were saying was

1808
02:41:37.050 --> 02:41:51.510
Raymond Bonilla: About like Daniel sprit kind of, you know, just a longer burn time you know just how long that that that is versus like with box. You're just busting this thing out. I also think it speaks to like wiring in the sense you know like

1809
02:41:51.810 --> 02:41:52.290
Dale Stephanos: Oh, if you

1810
02:41:52.380 --> 02:42:12.240
Raymond Bonilla: Could and how an artist is because I don't know if I could be I've romanticize about spending like a month on the painting and I, and I've been whenever if I ended ended up doing that. It's for the wrong reasons is because I just had no no direction on it and it's like just

1811
02:42:12.840 --> 02:42:15.330
Dale Stephanos: Lacking yeah thrashing isn't quite the same.

1812
02:42:15.960 --> 02:42:16.380
Right.

1813
02:42:18.390 --> 02:42:23.430
Raymond Bonilla: And so I think it's like also figuring out how

1814
02:42:24.570 --> 02:42:26.520
Raymond Bonilla: One sort of things and learns, but

1815
02:42:27.540 --> 02:42:30.420
Raymond Bonilla: You know, there's just as an artist like you can't

1816
02:42:31.380 --> 02:42:31.620
Dale Stephanos: You know,

1817
02:42:31.680 --> 02:42:42.540
Raymond Bonilla: Especially if you're trying to make this in a livelihood. Yeah, just working efficiently is is like the key. You know, it's in learning good fundamentals and

1818
02:42:43.560 --> 02:42:45.840
Raymond Bonilla: I mean, you're not going to learn how to

1819
02:42:47.310 --> 02:42:51.330
Raymond Bonilla: You know bust out a portrait in, you know, like a Chris Payne, like a double portion

1820
02:42:52.890 --> 02:42:58.650
Raymond Bonilla: In 55 minutes in between us like trying to figure out how to get the other reference on on

1821
02:42:59.670 --> 02:43:00.600
Raymond Bonilla: On the screen.

1822
02:43:00.750 --> 02:43:00.960
Right.

1823
02:43:02.280 --> 02:43:04.800
Dale Stephanos: You learn it just grinding, basically, you know,

1824
02:43:04.860 --> 02:43:05.880
Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

1825
02:43:06.450 --> 02:43:06.960
Raymond Bonilla: And, you know,

1826
02:43:07.590 --> 02:43:12.090
Raymond Bonilla: You and, you know, learn that with that, obviously, knowing how to draw the head, you know, and he's like,

1827
02:43:12.120 --> 02:43:16.380
Dale Stephanos: Hey way to promote Nice job, what

1828
02:43:16.410 --> 02:43:18.060
Raymond Bonilla: Do you want to be Chris Payne

1829
02:43:21.570 --> 02:43:24.000
Dale Stephanos: Water right to the product excellent work.

1830
02:43:25.020 --> 02:43:26.730
Raymond Bonilla: Time is actually a rainbow. Yeah, he

1831
02:43:30.120 --> 02:43:31.680
Don Kilpatrick III: Was a clinic there, man.

1832
02:43:33.870 --> 02:43:35.130
Raymond Bonilla: It just happened organically.

1833
02:43:42.300 --> 02:43:43.920
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, those are a lot of fun though.

1834
02:43:44.490 --> 02:43:54.060
Raymond Bonilla: There's a lot of fun and I love time assessments work to, like, it's like that stuff is really powerful stuff. He studied. He did a lot. He spent some time without bedroom.

1835
02:43:54.240 --> 02:43:55.350
Dale Stephanos: Yeah yeah

1836
02:43:56.760 --> 02:44:01.530
Dale Stephanos: I've been looking at a lot like my one of my bucket bucket list items is the

1837
02:44:03.060 --> 02:44:05.400
Dale Stephanos: The BP portrait award show

1838
02:44:05.580 --> 02:44:06.930
Bill Koeb: Oh, yeah, yeah.

1839
02:44:07.200 --> 02:44:09.600
Dale Stephanos: And I saw he was, he got in that

1840
02:44:09.660 --> 02:44:10.560
Raymond Bonilla: And so I was like yeah

1841
02:44:10.710 --> 02:44:14.220
Dale Stephanos: And another Illustrator. Right. I gotta, I gotta do this.

1842
02:44:14.520 --> 02:44:18.990
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. I feel the same way about that.

1843
02:44:19.080 --> 02:44:23.880
John English: You can do it. Dale, you can do it. That's what I'm just keep telling you, you can do it.

1844
02:44:24.090 --> 02:44:25.290
Dale Stephanos: Like your attitude john

1845
02:44:25.650 --> 02:44:26.100
You can

1846
02:44:28.320 --> 02:44:28.920
Bill Koeb: Use

1847
02:44:30.510 --> 02:44:32.040
Raymond Bonilla: The BP like the

1848
02:44:33.630 --> 02:44:34.590
Raymond Bonilla: Have you heard about

1849
02:44:35.970 --> 02:44:38.880
Raymond Bonilla: Like that, like the submission process for that.

1850
02:44:39.330 --> 02:44:40.260
It's pretty crazy.

1851
02:44:41.400 --> 02:44:44.040
Dale Stephanos: You know, it's not like this society. You don't just send stuff in and

1852
02:44:44.160 --> 02:44:49.500
Raymond Bonilla: Hopefully about it. No, you have to have, you have to hand deliver the artwork.

1853
02:44:50.880 --> 02:44:51.270
Dale Stephanos: Well, that's

1854
02:44:52.770 --> 02:44:54.300
Raymond Bonilla: So you have to go to London.

1855
02:44:54.720 --> 02:44:56.490
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and

1856
02:44:57.720 --> 02:45:11.190
Raymond Bonilla: A hand deliver the actual our core and then sit there. So, but what most people do, because they can all fly to London is there's a service that you can have you can hire an art handler to act as a proxies.

1857
02:45:12.300 --> 02:45:12.690
Raymond Bonilla: To

1858
02:45:13.050 --> 02:45:14.940
Raymond Bonilla: Submit the artwork on your behalf.

1859
02:45:15.540 --> 02:45:25.830
Don Kilpatrick III: You know what, we had a student, a couple of maybe this past year, who did that and I'm finally put into two together. I was like, BP it's sponsored by BP right

1860
02:45:26.010 --> 02:45:26.640
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, right.

1861
02:45:27.090 --> 02:45:28.980
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah yeah she she

1862
02:45:30.090 --> 02:45:31.590
Don Kilpatrick III: She hand delivered it there.

1863
02:45:32.910 --> 02:45:33.570
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, really good.

1864
02:45:33.780 --> 02:45:35.130
Dale Stephanos: Great reason for a trip.

1865
02:45:35.940 --> 02:45:36.300
Don Kilpatrick III: What's up,

1866
02:45:36.660 --> 02:45:38.160
Dale Stephanos: That's a good reason for a trip.

1867
02:45:38.280 --> 02:45:40.530
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, when we can do that again.

1868
02:45:40.770 --> 02:45:44.460
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, right. You want to swing by London I gotta drop off.

1869
02:45:46.770 --> 02:45:47.190
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

1870
02:45:50.220 --> 02:45:53.040
Dale Stephanos: That's that sounds like a pretty

1871
02:45:54.240 --> 02:45:56.850
Dale Stephanos: You know, pretty cool thing to do, though, it's like, Oh, yeah, yeah. I gotta

1872
02:45:57.870 --> 02:45:58.710
Dale Stephanos: Make it. This can't

1873
02:45:58.920 --> 02:46:01.800
Dale Stephanos: Draw I can't make it to drawing like this week. I've got to go to London.

1874
02:46:02.340 --> 02:46:06.240
Raymond Bonilla: Getting a just just for a quick, quick, quick stop over. Yeah.

1875
02:46:07.080 --> 02:46:07.620
Raymond Bonilla: And i don't i

1876
02:46:08.160 --> 02:46:10.200
Raymond Bonilla: Didn't Felicia forte, by any chance,

1877
02:46:10.500 --> 02:46:21.360
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. So she said to try. Yeah. Felicia was in the in the BP portrait. Oh, she she got into that show and and

1878
02:46:22.080 --> 02:46:22.950
Raymond Bonilla: He was that

1879
02:46:23.190 --> 02:46:31.140
Raymond Bonilla: She's awesome. And I think got an award of merit or something like that. And she went, and I heard an interview with her talking about like how awesome that was

1880
02:46:32.250 --> 02:46:35.640
Raymond Bonilla: And I'm like, yeah, I mean, how could it not be awesome.

1881
02:46:36.780 --> 02:46:39.960
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I don't know if an American has ever wanted though.

1882
02:46:40.770 --> 02:46:43.470
Bill Koeb: Phil Hale has been in it. He's

1883
02:46:43.530 --> 02:46:44.970
Raymond Bonilla: He's been in it. But as he wanted

1884
02:46:45.750 --> 02:46:46.770
Bill Koeb: I don't know.

1885
02:46:46.920 --> 02:46:48.450
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh yeah, like the grand prize. Right.

1886
02:46:48.480 --> 02:46:49.650
Raymond Bonilla: The grand prize. Yeah.

1887
02:46:52.050 --> 02:46:53.700
Dale Stephanos: I think didn't feel when

1888
02:46:54.030 --> 02:46:55.260
I thought he did one

1889
02:46:57.990 --> 02:46:58.830
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, maybe did

1890
02:47:00.720 --> 02:47:07.830
Raymond Bonilla: I know he got. He was the first American wasn't he the first American to defend the prime minister or am I making that up.

1891
02:47:08.640 --> 02:47:09.660
Raymond Bonilla: I did Tony Blair.

1892
02:47:10.440 --> 02:47:13.980
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, he, he got he got he caught hell for that too.

1893
02:47:14.550 --> 02:47:16.290
Raymond Bonilla: Yes, the greatest portrait.

1894
02:47:17.760 --> 02:47:18.660
Raymond Bonilla: It's so good.

1895
02:47:19.080 --> 02:47:19.980
Raymond Bonilla: Well, so good.

1896
02:47:20.880 --> 02:47:30.600
Dale Stephanos: I mean it's it's no it's no illusion Freud's portrait of of the Queen. I mean, that was that was like I was surprised he wasn't thrown in jail.

1897
02:47:32.610 --> 02:47:33.090
Dale Stephanos: Oh,

1898
02:47:33.630 --> 02:47:34.110
Yeah.

1899
02:47:35.370 --> 02:47:50.640
Raymond Bonilla: Well, you should see something like the Queen by I guess it's, I don't know if it's by law or by whatever it is, has to spend money on portraits over so most of them, she doesn't see past like the unveiling

1900
02:47:51.150 --> 02:47:51.660
Okay.

1901
02:47:53.010 --> 02:47:59.910
Raymond Bonilla: And so she probably saw that once, is that all right. So we will just give it to some museum or something like that on to the next one. I got about seven more today.

1902
02:48:00.390 --> 02:48:00.930
Dale Stephanos: Right, right.

1903
02:48:01.200 --> 02:48:02.430
Raymond Bonilla: You know cuz

1904
02:48:03.480 --> 02:48:03.750
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1905
02:48:06.990 --> 02:48:09.960
Tim Trabon: Right, I just like the idea of the queen. Sweet.

1906
02:48:14.220 --> 02:48:15.930
Tim Trabon: sick, sick.

1907
02:48:22.230 --> 02:48:22.680
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

1908
02:48:24.840 --> 02:48:25.320
Tim Trabon: We

1909
02:48:28.080 --> 02:48:28.770
Raymond Bonilla: Like it, Mom.

1910
02:48:34.410 --> 02:48:35.520
John English: We got two minutes.

1911
02:48:40.200 --> 02:48:41.790
John English: What I got no answer that.

1912
02:48:42.840 --> 02:48:44.190
Dale Stephanos: I need two minutes.

1913
02:48:46.710 --> 02:48:48.900
Dale Stephanos: And two minutes isn't really going to do anything here.

1914
02:48:49.110 --> 02:48:50.550
John English: I mean either i'm i'm

1915
02:48:54.810 --> 02:48:55.590
Bill Koeb: That's a tough one.

1916
02:48:57.360 --> 02:48:59.970
John English: That's why I gave it to Dale because I knew he can handle it.

1917
02:49:05.370 --> 02:49:08.040
Raymond Bonilla: even tried to say you sabotage his camera to

1918
02:49:08.580 --> 02:49:10.860
Raymond Bonilla: Know, and he still was able to finish it.

1919
02:49:11.730 --> 02:49:15.300
Bill Koeb: Yeah. What's that little face up above your head.

1920
02:49:16.800 --> 02:49:18.810
Raymond Bonilla: Was that a doodle painting on a phone thing.

1921
02:49:19.080 --> 02:49:20.370
Bill Koeb: Oh this. Yeah.

1922
02:49:20.880 --> 02:49:22.410
Dale Stephanos: Oh, I was messing around with

1923
02:49:23.820 --> 02:49:24.450
Don Kilpatrick III: Upper

1924
02:49:24.720 --> 02:49:26.280
Dale Stephanos: Oh, copper, yeah.

1925
02:49:26.610 --> 02:49:27.390
Bill Koeb: Beautiful.

1926
02:49:27.450 --> 02:49:29.040
Dale Stephanos: This is like my scratch pad for

1927
02:49:29.160 --> 02:49:31.020
Bill Koeb: Copper betta

1928
02:49:31.980 --> 02:49:33.960
Dale Stephanos: Well, no, no. I was trying to figure out how to how to do it.

1929
02:49:34.320 --> 02:49:34.770
Dale Stephanos: That's

1930
02:49:34.830 --> 02:49:36.120
Bill Koeb: Shut up. That's amazing.

1931
02:49:37.620 --> 02:49:40.350
Don Kilpatrick III: Did you prime it or before you painted him on that.

1932
02:49:40.410 --> 02:49:45.180
Dale Stephanos: No, I have no idea what I'm doing. So I'd send it here with like 2500

1933
02:49:45.630 --> 02:49:46.890
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

1934
02:49:48.630 --> 02:49:48.930
Tim Trabon: Cuz

1935
02:49:49.170 --> 02:49:53.700
Dale Stephanos: I realized the problem I was having was it's so reflective

1936
02:49:54.030 --> 02:49:54.450
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1937
02:49:54.750 --> 02:49:57.480
Dale Stephanos: That you're getting values, it says tough.

1938
02:49:57.990 --> 02:50:03.120
Tim Trabon: Yeah yeah do. Can you bring that real close to the camera just curious how

1939
02:50:04.440 --> 02:50:06.660
Tim Trabon: Yeah, that clear is tough. It's so cool.

1940
02:50:06.870 --> 02:50:08.070
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that's beautiful.

1941
02:50:08.250 --> 02:50:10.410
Dale Stephanos: On. You know what I saw that

1942
02:50:12.180 --> 02:50:16.200
Dale Stephanos: There's an amazing portrait on copper at the Detroit museum.

1943
02:50:18.480 --> 02:50:19.620
Don Kilpatrick III: By Mario more

1944
02:50:21.930 --> 02:50:23.670
Dale Stephanos: I think it was his mother. I don't. I don't.

1945
02:50:24.120 --> 02:50:28.560
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, it's of his mother. Yeah, that's, that's, that was one of my first students when I came here to teach

1946
02:50:29.070 --> 02:50:29.370
Dale Stephanos: Art

1947
02:50:30.120 --> 02:50:31.500
Dale Stephanos: That is blew my mind.

1948
02:50:32.400 --> 02:50:34.680
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, he's he's great. I

1949
02:50:36.930 --> 02:50:39.750
Don Kilpatrick III: You know, we have him back on occasion to speak.

1950
02:50:39.900 --> 02:50:40.440
Don Kilpatrick III: And

1951
02:50:41.100 --> 02:50:41.670
Raymond Bonilla: I want to thank

1952
02:50:42.210 --> 02:50:43.290
Don Kilpatrick III: Mario more

1953
02:50:44.790 --> 02:50:45.390
Dale Stephanos: All the things

1954
02:50:45.750 --> 02:50:50.610
Don Kilpatrick III: He's probably like early 30s. Now,

1955
02:50:50.940 --> 02:50:51.570
Dale Stephanos: Well,

1956
02:50:51.780 --> 02:51:01.950
Don Kilpatrick III: It's been, it's been a little over 10 years since you know he was in that first group of students that I have the honor teaching when I got here and and his Easter epic as mothers and artists too and it's

1957
02:51:03.780 --> 02:51:13.470
Don Kilpatrick III: You know that that portrait that you're talking about. It's a curse. Sabrina and she's you know she's a really she's one of my favorite people that they're both terrific and

1958
02:51:15.900 --> 02:51:17.250
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, are you went back to

1959
02:51:19.020 --> 02:51:20.070
Raymond Bonilla: Work looks beautiful.

1960
02:51:22.950 --> 02:51:25.830
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, he's he's done some really interesting work and

1961
02:51:27.270 --> 02:51:32.070
Don Kilpatrick III: You know, he just recently spoke to the virtual guest artists, you know,

1962
02:51:33.570 --> 02:51:47.340
Don Kilpatrick III: Presentation for us here. And he actually came back as you know as a painter. He didn't come back, necessarily, you know, another department added here. But what I really loved was the fact yeah that's I think that's something his grandmother

1963
02:51:47.850 --> 02:51:48.270
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

1964
02:51:49.110 --> 02:51:50.100
Dale Stephanos: This was incredible.

1965
02:51:50.640 --> 02:51:51.300
Dale Stephanos: Yeah.

1966
02:51:51.540 --> 02:51:56.430
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, like it didn't look like he send it anything. So I was just trying to figure out what he was doing and

1967
02:51:56.490 --> 02:52:01.860
Don Kilpatrick III: He explained it in his presentation, you know what, I'll, I'll, I'll email him I you know

1968
02:52:03.300 --> 02:52:10.530
Don Kilpatrick III: From time to time. He and I talked the email or messenger or whatever and all I'll ask him, because he didn't explain it in this presentation, but he also

1969
02:52:11.190 --> 02:52:20.970
Don Kilpatrick III: He really what what I was really happy with this. He gave a lot of credit for. You know what, you know, his skill building and all that good stuff from, you know, his background is illustration

1970
02:52:21.630 --> 02:52:23.250
Don Kilpatrick III: So, yeah.

1971
02:52:25.860 --> 02:52:31.110
Bill Koeb: Somebody asked Mitch Hines asked, what would be the advantages benefits of working on copper

1972
02:52:33.780 --> 02:52:34.080
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh,

1973
02:52:34.620 --> 02:52:35.310
I was wondering

1974
02:52:37.470 --> 02:52:38.250
Don Kilpatrick III: I don't know.

1975
02:52:38.460 --> 02:52:39.270
Dale Stephanos: If you can come up

1976
02:52:39.510 --> 02:52:42.870
Tim Trabon: Worst case scenario, you can scrap it for you.

1977
02:52:43.530 --> 02:52:43.800
Well,

1978
02:52:46.020 --> 02:52:47.220
Tim Trabon: Yeah yeah

1979
02:52:47.730 --> 02:52:48.660
Dale Stephanos: Best case scenario.

1980
02:52:49.080 --> 02:52:51.450
Dale Stephanos: You know, you can come up with something like that.

1981
02:52:51.870 --> 02:52:55.440
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah, yeah. So from what I've heard.

1982
02:52:56.820 --> 02:52:58.800
Raymond Bonilla: Because I know some artists that do it.

1983
02:52:59.610 --> 02:53:12.720
Raymond Bonilla: Have painted on copper and they say, just the painting on that warm super warm undertone is like you. It's hard to replicate because it's so rich in orange, you know,

1984
02:53:13.380 --> 02:53:23.130
Raymond Bonilla: Which I'm sure you're getting that Dale like that, like, kind of like that, once you put a paint down, it's like, wow, this is actually really rich underneath it.

1985
02:53:23.550 --> 02:53:27.840
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, once you get once you kind of get one layer on

1986
02:53:29.940 --> 02:53:30.810
Dale Stephanos: It's a little better.

1987
02:53:31.020 --> 02:53:32.970
Bill Koeb: Are you working on that or

1988
02:53:34.290 --> 02:53:40.200
Dale Stephanos: This is oil. And again, this is a scratch pad. So this was acrylic

1989
02:53:41.040 --> 02:53:41.430
Oh, wow.

1990
02:53:45.150 --> 02:53:47.400
Dale Stephanos: To go you know oil over acrylic

1991
02:53:47.970 --> 02:53:49.710
Bill Koeb: Oh. That's very cool.

1992
02:53:50.100 --> 02:53:53.730
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, when you're under paintings and acrylic. Is that what you do. Yeah.

1993
02:53:54.960 --> 02:53:57.030
Dale Stephanos: Just because I just want to get to it. You know what I mean.

1994
02:53:57.420 --> 02:53:58.920
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, I'll make sense.

1995
02:54:01.980 --> 02:54:03.840
Raymond Bonilla: So there's a a

1996
02:54:05.610 --> 02:54:10.080
Raymond Bonilla: brand called artifacts. Have you ever heard of that they make like

1997
02:54:10.770 --> 02:54:27.030
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, so that yeah they make like a they mount. They have cameras mounted on aluminum panel and they also make copper panel. And if you've ever wanted to talk to

1998
02:54:29.130 --> 02:54:38.970
Raymond Bonilla: Someone about that, like prepping it because I know like you're supposed to wash it down with alcohol, I think. And some people lightly sand it and then just paint right on it.

1999
02:54:39.630 --> 02:54:47.880
Raymond Bonilla: But I might be remembering that incorrectly. There's a and I just put it through in the chat. The owner Anton O'Hanlon is like

2000
02:54:50.370 --> 02:54:56.730
Raymond Bonilla: Extremely one of the most knowledgeable people I've ever met in my life when it comes to support his father is

2001
02:54:58.380 --> 02:54:59.280
Raymond Bonilla: forgot his name.

2002
02:55:00.330 --> 02:55:02.220
Raymond Bonilla: But is known for, like, is

2003
02:55:04.050 --> 02:55:12.360
Raymond Bonilla: Being the top top sort of researcher in materials and stuff being like archival and things like that.

2004
02:55:13.530 --> 02:55:14.670
Raymond Bonilla: He goes around the

2005
02:55:16.470 --> 02:55:18.120
Raymond Bonilla: World, giving lectures.

2006
02:55:19.290 --> 02:55:23.160
Raymond Bonilla: And effort, and he runs his own. What is the

2007
02:55:24.750 --> 02:55:27.660
Raymond Bonilla: I'm like, now I'm blanking on this here.

2008
02:55:29.340 --> 02:55:31.110
Raymond Bonilla: Links about

2009
02:55:32.670 --> 02:55:34.020
Raymond Bonilla: So anyways, Anton will

2010
02:55:35.400 --> 02:55:42.450
Raymond Bonilla: You know, because he makes those panels so he he he's one of those like he's old he's he's not that old.

2011
02:55:43.560 --> 02:55:48.450
Raymond Bonilla: I mean, I'm in my 30s. I didn't come easy younger than I am. But he's one of those old school guys like, hey, call me up.

2012
02:55:49.230 --> 02:55:51.720
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, that's good. And the numbers right there.

2013
02:55:51.810 --> 02:55:55.290
Raymond Bonilla: And you could just call from nine to four Pacific Standard Time.

2014
02:55:56.160 --> 02:55:56.970
Dale Stephanos: Awesome, really.

2015
02:55:57.060 --> 02:56:00.840
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. And so we did a we had like a

2016
02:56:02.130 --> 02:56:10.290
Raymond Bonilla: Show with at Ben Gallery in Denver and they did a show where everyone did stuff on their panels and

2017
02:56:10.920 --> 02:56:20.280
Raymond Bonilla: He, he had sent us all emails saying like, hey, is anybody you know was, what do people want in terms of what you're working method and it's like it.

2018
02:56:20.730 --> 02:56:29.670
Raymond Bonilla: And I wanted to mount my like drawing prints on to with Matt medium onto this thing. Like, I usually do. And he said, Well, why don't you give me a call. We could talk it through and

2019
02:56:30.150 --> 02:56:39.990
Raymond Bonilla: I called him up and he answered every single question I had, and we went through things and he was like, Yeah, looks good is like if you want to do this. You could also try this and x, y, and z. This is what I do.

2020
02:56:42.090 --> 02:56:44.640
Raymond Bonilla: Is great father's name is George O'Hanlon

2021
02:56:45.720 --> 02:56:46.620
Dale Stephanos: What's his name again.

2022
02:56:47.100 --> 02:56:54.030
Raymond Bonilla: Is his name. So his, his name is Anton O'Hanlon but his father's name is George O'Hanlon and

2023
02:56:55.890 --> 02:56:57.900
Raymond Bonilla: Georgiou handling is like the

2024
02:57:00.750 --> 02:57:07.470
Raymond Bonilla: He runs. Oh my goodness. Why am I blanking on this natural pigments. Have you ever heard of natural pigments.

2025
02:57:08.730 --> 02:57:15.780
Raymond Bonilla: That's like soup that's all archival pigments. It's like we're talking down the rabbit hole here people so

2026
02:57:18.150 --> 02:57:24.930
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah, it's, it's, uh, he would have a heart attack and we found that that people here we're using tar probably on

2027
02:57:27.390 --> 02:57:27.630
But

2028
02:57:31.020 --> 02:57:33.990
Raymond Bonilla: Anyway, so that that will let I threw everything in there.

2029
02:57:34.050 --> 02:57:35.220
Raymond Bonilla: So just in case you know

2030
02:57:35.700 --> 02:57:39.240
Raymond Bonilla: My job. I mean, I'm like hey you know if it sticks. You know, it's worth it.

2031
02:57:40.800 --> 02:57:41.130
Raymond Bonilla: You know,

2032
02:57:43.380 --> 02:57:48.690
Tim Trabon: So, Mitch followed up and said I googled it. And it's a copper is more durable. It can also

2033
02:57:49.800 --> 02:57:54.270
Tim Trabon: Double as a weapon. Now it's like it is hot.

2034
02:57:56.010 --> 02:57:59.550
Tim Trabon: Yeah, it's more durable. It's funny you use it as a shield

2035
02:58:02.610 --> 02:58:12.000
Raymond Bonilla: I knew an artist by the name of Richard Murdoch who painted exclusively on copper and he he swore by it. He said he said the paint. Paint sits on it like nothing else.

2036
02:58:14.880 --> 02:58:15.300
Tim Trabon: Kathleen

2037
02:58:16.170 --> 02:58:18.660
Tim Trabon: Del Carmen. Did you see I come in re

2038
02:58:19.920 --> 02:58:20.340
Tim Trabon: Enter.

2039
02:58:28.650 --> 02:58:31.350
Raymond Bonilla: Has anybody ever played ping on a little bit of my panel.

2040
02:58:31.860 --> 02:58:33.180
Dale Stephanos: Yeah, I've tried that.

2041
02:58:33.630 --> 02:58:34.110
Yeah.

2042
02:58:36.420 --> 02:58:39.900
Dale Stephanos: This all sorts of shenanigans going on. I mean, the

2043
02:58:41.430 --> 02:58:44.040
Dale Stephanos: David. David is a kid kassin or

2044
02:58:44.280 --> 02:58:45.150
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

2045
02:58:45.270 --> 02:58:45.930
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah yeah

2046
02:58:46.260 --> 02:58:48.180
Dale Stephanos: You painting on like a mirror or something.

2047
02:58:51.000 --> 02:58:56.070
Raymond Bonilla: I cannot even know. I've never seen his paintings on mirrors, he paints on aluminum.

2048
02:58:57.810 --> 02:59:02.850
Raymond Bonilla: Panels, I know that because he's actually one of artifacts is

2049
02:59:04.980 --> 02:59:07.080
Raymond Bonilla: Sort of artists ambassadors.

2050
02:59:07.410 --> 02:59:07.860
Okay.

2051
02:59:10.500 --> 02:59:19.440
Raymond Bonilla: But I've seen I've seen people paint just on on mirrors for what's this this is looking at this one a bit Illustrator, but he's a portrait painter.

2052
02:59:20.550 --> 02:59:23.490
Tim Trabon: It seems kind of seems kind of vain.

2053
02:59:24.840 --> 02:59:25.200
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

2054
02:59:25.980 --> 02:59:27.000
Tim Trabon: That why it

2055
02:59:27.390 --> 02:59:29.520
Tim Trabon: And and the benefits are obvious.

2056
02:59:38.790 --> 02:59:40.890
Raymond Bonilla: Now you got me going down a rabbit hole here.

2057
02:59:41.400 --> 02:59:44.970
Bill Koeb: Marshall Arizona just beautiful paintings on copper to their like

2058
02:59:45.570 --> 02:59:47.220
Tim Trabon: Mitch. Mitch corrected.

2059
02:59:47.310 --> 02:59:56.430
Tim Trabon: His message and said, durable, and that there's no it's mildew resistant know mildew resistant to insects.

2060
02:59:58.680 --> 02:59:59.250
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

2061
02:59:59.670 --> 03:00:00.450
Tim Trabon: So I

2062
03:00:00.510 --> 03:00:04.350
Tim Trabon: Dale all about that'll be anti insect.

2063
03:00:06.690 --> 03:00:07.680
Tim Trabon: got worried are

2064
03:00:07.920 --> 03:00:09.630
Tim Trabon: You. Hey,

2065
03:00:09.810 --> 03:00:10.050
This

2066
03:00:11.070 --> 03:00:12.330
Tim Trabon: Is like, yeah.

2067
03:00:12.750 --> 03:00:15.360
Tim Trabon: Calling it call one 800 copper

2068
03:00:16.830 --> 03:00:18.750
Tim Trabon: Like I'm trying to imagine this like

2069
03:00:19.320 --> 03:00:20.550
Raymond Bonilla: Or leave it in the lot.

2070
03:00:20.730 --> 03:00:23.910
Tim Trabon: Are you sick of insects getting all over your

2071
03:00:27.570 --> 03:00:31.470
Tim Trabon: Head, you can leave it on one call, one 800 passage

2072
03:00:35.130 --> 03:00:38.760
Raymond Bonilla: Well, and then also the copper panels like the aluminum pan and they don't work.

2073
03:00:39.600 --> 03:00:41.550
Raymond Bonilla: That's a big thing. Yeah, so

2074
03:00:42.660 --> 03:00:45.720
Raymond Bonilla: They're completely stable so they don't have

2075
03:00:45.840 --> 03:00:47.520
Raymond Bonilla: Like cracking or anything like that. So,

2076
03:00:47.520 --> 03:00:55.170
Dale Stephanos: So you could probably if you paint an oil, you could these would probably survive the dreaded flood in your basement.

2077
03:00:55.740 --> 03:00:56.670
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, they don't do

2078
03:00:56.700 --> 03:00:58.470
Raymond Bonilla: They want to relax. Yeah, sure.

2079
03:00:58.560 --> 03:01:05.790
Dale Stephanos: Yeah. What else no water is not doing anything to oil right as long as the support doesn't expand or contract.

2080
03:01:06.540 --> 03:01:06.930
Right.

2081
03:01:09.000 --> 03:01:09.960
Raymond Bonilla: Not the way I do it.

2082
03:01:15.330 --> 03:01:19.470
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. So it does my do I paint on on what the panel, but

2083
03:01:21.330 --> 03:01:23.400
John English: But years ago, Timmy and I tested.

2084
03:01:25.170 --> 03:01:27.930
John English: Many different demo. What would happen in water.

2085
03:01:28.440 --> 03:01:31.230
Tim Trabon: Oh shit, sorry. That is just

2086
03:01:32.040 --> 03:01:38.370
Tim Trabon: The most amazing ridiculous thing ever. JOHN take it. It's worth telling.

2087
03:01:40.380 --> 03:01:41.580
Tim Trabon: That was man.

2088
03:01:42.270 --> 03:01:55.590
John English: Timmy Timmy is dead. Tim was convincing convincing me it's like Johnny. We got all this we got all this warehouse space at the fulfillment center for his printing company, you need to move all the Academy of equipment down there.

2089
03:01:57.300 --> 03:01:59.160
Tim Trabon: I'm gonna, I'm going to reframe this

2090
03:01:59.400 --> 03:02:01.980
Tim Trabon: Nobody really liked having our stuff there.

2091
03:02:04.020 --> 03:02:04.890
John English: But it was it was

2092
03:02:06.180 --> 03:02:08.160
John English: Your father. He asked me was,

2093
03:02:08.160 --> 03:02:10.290
Tim Trabon: Because it had to be moved from the print

2094
03:02:13.380 --> 03:02:14.820
Tim Trabon: Just moving stuff around

2095
03:02:17.130 --> 03:02:20.130
John English: We, we move everything down there and

2096
03:02:21.660 --> 03:02:26.670
John English: The Thousand years flood happens at the Trayvon fulfillment center, they get

2097
03:02:27.780 --> 03:02:29.250
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, no.

2098
03:02:30.840 --> 03:02:31.410
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

2099
03:02:31.650 --> 03:02:33.690
Tim Trabon: We go. That was a nightmare for Trayvon

2100
03:02:34.050 --> 03:02:39.660
Tim Trabon: For Trayvon praying that was it. I mean, cuz it. That was their warehouse for paper right

2101
03:02:40.470 --> 03:02:48.540
Tim Trabon: It was it was devastating and but john I remember going there with you because we we were kind of the last

2102
03:02:49.170 --> 03:03:03.480
Tim Trabon: To go go through. I mean, it was this this this river went up flooded the whole warehouse and then it looked like the water went in there and kind of lifted everything off the ground to where it was flowing inside

2103
03:03:04.050 --> 03:03:19.470
Tim Trabon: shook it up and then just dropped it down where it was. And I remember john we were going up the steps to this because the the first floor was like six, seven feet off the ground. You know, it was a loading dock. So like five feet off the ground, I guess.

2104
03:03:19.500 --> 03:03:21.150
John English: Remember what we ran into

2105
03:03:21.270 --> 03:03:30.330
Tim Trabon: Yeah, and it was like, I wonder if it's going to you know when or how bad it's going to be john look down at the ground and he goes, I don't think this is good. And there was a fish next to this boy.

2106
03:03:33.330 --> 03:03:35.100
Tim Trabon: Oh, no.

2107
03:03:35.310 --> 03:03:47.940
John English: So I immediately call I said I took a photo of it and I sent it to the Chief Executive Officer at the time of trade bond is a very nice guy and I sent it to him and I said,

2108
03:03:48.960 --> 03:03:56.400
John English: Can you believe this. He said, Yeah, we were in there for the last two days because just because. Watch out for the snakes.

2109
03:03:58.440 --> 03:03:59.520
Raymond Bonilla: Wow.

2110
03:04:01.020 --> 03:04:08.730
Tim Trabon: That was the worst yeah so john and I always talk about the folding tables for the illustration Academy

2111
03:04:10.530 --> 03:04:17.550
Tim Trabon: The, the bane of my existence. Are these for these like six foot long folding tables are there eight feet on

2112
03:04:18.090 --> 03:04:26.400
Tim Trabon: Six. Six. They're heavy enough as is, but folding tables, when they get full of like 30 pounds of water.

2113
03:04:27.000 --> 03:04:29.220
Tim Trabon: Oh, brutal. Yeah.

2114
03:04:29.250 --> 03:04:29.790
God

2115
03:04:30.810 --> 03:04:31.830
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my god.

2116
03:04:33.060 --> 03:04:33.420
Raymond Bonilla: It was

2117
03:04:35.130 --> 03:04:43.440
Tim Trabon: A real bootstrapping chapter the academy, because most people would be like, we just need to go buy new tables. I was like, we're going to drive these things out. We're going to power, Washington.

2118
03:04:46.110 --> 03:04:46.650
Tim Trabon: So,

2119
03:04:47.580 --> 03:04:52.230
John English: Okay, so we're over on our time and we should probably

2120
03:04:52.350 --> 03:04:52.770
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

2121
03:04:53.700 --> 03:04:56.580
John English: We should get getting late. We should get to the Facebook stuff here.

2122
03:04:57.030 --> 03:05:00.570
John English: Let's do a Timmy, are you capable of showing that you want my

2123
03:05:00.630 --> 03:05:01.740
Tim Trabon: I am not.

2124
03:05:02.670 --> 03:05:05.100
Tim Trabon: Okay, not a few Samira

2125
03:05:05.790 --> 03:05:09.960
John English: Well, while you're walking around with join people

2126
03:05:11.790 --> 03:05:16.440
John English: I will get to Facebook and hopefully not share anything. I don't. Yeah.

2127
03:05:47.760 --> 03:05:50.100
John English: He walked. Have you gone around the room with people's work.

2128
03:05:50.550 --> 03:05:51.990
Tim Trabon: I'm actually on grid.

2129
03:05:52.020 --> 03:05:52.620
John English: It's cool. Yeah.

2130
03:05:52.650 --> 03:05:55.470
John English: So we don't have to. Okay. Yeah. All right. I'll just share

2131
03:06:04.140 --> 03:06:04.560
John English: Here we go.

2132
03:06:14.340 --> 03:06:15.750
John English: People are posting quickly.

2133
03:06:20.940 --> 03:06:32.280
Tim Trabon: And I'll just somebody, somebody posted today. So about on in regards to this. And so I'm just going to quickly say we we try to comment on everybody's work.

2134
03:06:33.690 --> 03:06:38.610
Tim Trabon: But if we don't say something about your work. It's not cold, it, it doesn't mean anything.

2135
03:06:40.530 --> 03:06:43.680
Tim Trabon: There's just so much work we want to see all of it so

2136
03:06:44.820 --> 03:06:49.500
Tim Trabon: If you keep attending these things, eventually you will get a wow

2137
03:06:50.310 --> 03:06:50.640
Tim Trabon: Great.

2138
03:06:50.730 --> 03:07:00.390
Tim Trabon: Well that's, yeah, that's cool. But I don't take it personally. It really is just, we want to be able to see everybody's work so

2139
03:07:01.050 --> 03:07:04.950
John English: Okay. So I'll start off, I really don't care for this one. Very much so.

2140
03:07:09.030 --> 03:07:12.420
Tim Trabon: Yeah, it's gonna get real. It's gonna get real now.

2141
03:07:14.040 --> 03:07:18.690
John English: And I'm totally kidding, because I can do that because this is such a good piece this beautiful piece.

2142
03:07:23.790 --> 03:07:24.480
Bill Koeb: That's cool.

2143
03:07:24.690 --> 03:07:35.010
John English: We've had I'm always just blown away at so many different interpretations of everything. Oh, Addy. Oh no, he's liking that. Okay. I was gonna say

2144
03:07:35.670 --> 03:07:37.410
Tim Trabon: Not working digitally.

2145
03:07:37.740 --> 03:07:38.400
John English: Or next Laura.

2146
03:07:40.860 --> 03:07:43.410
Tim Trabon: Somebody says roast us like Gordon Ramsay

2147
03:07:46.470 --> 03:07:49.350
Tim Trabon: Great add Addison. That's funny.

2148
03:07:51.420 --> 03:07:52.800
John English: Now we're not gonna do that.

2149
03:07:53.340 --> 03:07:55.080
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, that's nice. That's great.

2150
03:07:59.460 --> 03:08:01.440
That's really cool. Wow.

2151
03:08:02.910 --> 03:08:03.480
Very nice.

2152
03:08:05.580 --> 03:08:07.740
Bill Koeb: Talk about getting to it and doing it quickly.

2153
03:08:08.190 --> 03:08:09.240
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, right.

2154
03:08:09.300 --> 03:08:10.650
John English: There nice painting.

2155
03:08:14.220 --> 03:08:14.790
John English: Oh, wow.

2156
03:08:16.200 --> 03:08:16.800
Don Kilpatrick III: That's fun.

2157
03:08:21.150 --> 03:08:23.250
John English: Randy, really nice.

2158
03:08:32.430 --> 03:08:37.020
Bill Koeb: So many good ones I like the way that the figures in the background behind that one too.

2159
03:08:39.810 --> 03:08:40.860
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh wow, nice solution.

2160
03:08:40.890 --> 03:08:42.090
Raymond Bonilla: Nice, nice.

2161
03:08:45.600 --> 03:08:46.410
Is nice to

2162
03:08:47.880 --> 03:08:48.630
John English: Nice.

2163
03:08:53.250 --> 03:08:54.720
Raymond Bonilla: Look at that, the montage.

2164
03:08:54.990 --> 03:08:56.760
Bill Koeb: Yeah, oh yeah.

2165
03:08:58.980 --> 03:09:00.480
Don Kilpatrick III: breaking it up. Yeah.

2166
03:09:03.840 --> 03:09:04.290
Nice.

2167
03:09:14.250 --> 03:09:14.820
John English: Good one.

2168
03:09:18.210 --> 03:09:20.310
John English: There's, there's a lot going on in that photograph.

2169
03:09:20.700 --> 03:09:21.300
Raymond Bonilla: Well, yeah.

2170
03:09:25.080 --> 03:09:25.770
That's nice.

2171
03:09:32.820 --> 03:09:34.800
Raymond Bonilla: Nice, you go

2172
03:09:42.150 --> 03:09:43.020
John English: That's interesting.

2173
03:09:48.210 --> 03:09:48.930
Same page.

2174
03:10:03.720 --> 03:10:05.340
John English: I like the aura around and said,

2175
03:10:08.430 --> 03:10:09.030
John English: That's fine.

2176
03:10:09.510 --> 03:10:10.140
That's great.

2177
03:10:11.190 --> 03:10:12.000
John English: That's really good.

2178
03:10:13.980 --> 03:10:14.760
John English: A tough one to

2179
03:10:16.440 --> 03:10:17.640
John English: Dig into yeah

2180
03:10:21.030 --> 03:10:22.380
John English: I certainly needed more time.

2181
03:10:26.910 --> 03:10:27.690
Bill Koeb: Like the CPU.

2182
03:10:33.090 --> 03:10:33.690
John English: Very good.

2183
03:10:37.110 --> 03:10:39.090
Raymond Bonilla: I just realized I missed two drawings, so we

2184
03:10:49.470 --> 03:10:50.370
Don Kilpatrick III: Kind of feel to it.

2185
03:10:50.880 --> 03:10:51.720
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, totally.

2186
03:10:52.110 --> 03:10:57.450
John English: Aaron just knocked it out of park on assignment. She did for Dale and I think portfolio class.

2187
03:10:58.650 --> 03:10:59.160
Dale Stephanos: So good.

2188
03:10:59.490 --> 03:11:00.150
Don Kilpatrick III: Great work.

2189
03:11:01.080 --> 03:11:01.620
John English: Nice.

2190
03:11:02.100 --> 03:11:02.550
Yeah, we're

2191
03:11:03.660 --> 03:11:04.320
John English: Really fun

2192
03:11:05.700 --> 03:11:08.160
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, nice, nice monochrome on

2193
03:11:11.370 --> 03:11:12.690
Raymond Bonilla: Nice, Gary.

2194
03:11:15.510 --> 03:11:15.990
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

2195
03:11:16.740 --> 03:11:18.420
Raymond Bonilla: Whatever Gary thumbs down.

2196
03:11:29.310 --> 03:11:30.210
Raymond Bonilla: This crazy

2197
03:11:30.270 --> 03:11:31.140
Bill Koeb: That's a really good one.

2198
03:11:31.530 --> 03:11:32.640
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, fire.

2199
03:11:34.080 --> 03:11:34.920
Don Kilpatrick III: Beautiful false

2200
03:11:35.190 --> 03:11:36.780
Bill Koeb: Brian Yeah.

2201
03:11:37.950 --> 03:11:40.080
Dale Stephanos: Please recognizable Brian last

2202
03:11:40.260 --> 03:11:40.950
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. Yep.

2203
03:11:42.570 --> 03:11:43.860
John English: You know, it says stuff.

2204
03:11:44.970 --> 03:11:45.720
Bill Koeb: That's cool.

2205
03:11:47.220 --> 03:11:48.660
Tim Trabon: Will give a free portfolio.

2206
03:11:49.620 --> 03:11:50.220
John English: real commitment.

2207
03:11:50.850 --> 03:11:51.990
To whoever

2208
03:11:53.340 --> 03:11:55.590
Tim Trabon: Gets this artwork to these guys.

2209
03:12:02.220 --> 03:12:02.760
Raymond Bonilla: Nice.

2210
03:12:07.950 --> 03:12:08.310
John English: Nice.

2211
03:12:10.230 --> 03:12:12.840
Raymond Bonilla: Whoa, whoa, hey,

2212
03:12:20.460 --> 03:12:22.740
Raymond Bonilla: Well, the Thomas. Thomas box here collector

2213
03:12:23.070 --> 03:12:23.700
John English: That's right.

2214
03:12:25.110 --> 03:12:25.710
Don Kilpatrick III: Oh, man.

2215
03:12:27.750 --> 03:12:32.430
John English: Every time I see see Roberta. I don't know if I cameras. I go, Look, look, I got one too.

2216
03:12:42.420 --> 03:12:42.990
John English: That's fun.

2217
03:12:44.220 --> 03:12:48.990
John English: I like to do the design of the rivets Crusher. He's nice. Yeah.

2218
03:12:51.930 --> 03:12:58.650
John English: You know, actually, I gotta look at that again. Hold on. My favorite part of that is the drawing of this guy back here.

2219
03:12:58.830 --> 03:12:59.490
That's really

2220
03:13:04.920 --> 03:13:05.610
John English: Well, very good.

2221
03:13:05.670 --> 03:13:06.540
Michael nice

2222
03:13:11.730 --> 03:13:15.060
Tim Trabon: I forgot to mention that Alexander Jefferson, the last

2223
03:13:16.440 --> 03:13:17.730
Tim Trabon: Class individual we drew

2224
03:13:19.110 --> 03:13:22.470
Tim Trabon: talks extensively in that documentary about drawing

2225
03:13:23.730 --> 03:13:29.790
Tim Trabon: Was like one of his saving graces of being in the POW camp. He like drew everything

2226
03:13:30.150 --> 03:13:31.890
John English: He recorded everything with the drawing.

2227
03:13:32.010 --> 03:13:36.000
Tim Trabon: And so you have these collections of all of his drawings from when he was there.

2228
03:13:36.540 --> 03:13:38.070
Tim Trabon: Wow. Yeah.

2229
03:13:38.340 --> 03:13:40.410
Tim Trabon: So that those even more circle.

2230
03:13:40.620 --> 03:13:41.040
Yeah.

2231
03:13:42.150 --> 03:13:43.110
Don Kilpatrick III: That's awesome.

2232
03:13:46.800 --> 03:13:47.520
John English: That's nice.

2233
03:13:48.930 --> 03:13:49.410
Don Kilpatrick III: Texture

2234
03:13:53.970 --> 03:13:55.020
Raymond Bonilla: That's great.

2235
03:13:56.370 --> 03:13:58.530
Don Kilpatrick III: Very nice, really nice Sherry.

2236
03:13:59.670 --> 03:14:00.600
John English: They'll go back this

2237
03:14:01.230 --> 03:14:02.460
One, it's beautiful.

2238
03:14:05.220 --> 03:14:07.200
John English: Super simple. And it's all there.

2239
03:14:11.460 --> 03:14:11.910
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

2240
03:14:13.320 --> 03:14:13.950
John English: All right.

2241
03:14:15.510 --> 03:14:16.290
John English: In the house.

2242
03:14:18.420 --> 03:14:19.980
Raymond Bonilla: Tommy Get Schooled folks.

2243
03:14:22.740 --> 03:14:23.190
John English: Wow.

2244
03:14:24.450 --> 03:14:24.960
John English: Very nice.

2245
03:14:32.130 --> 03:14:33.030
John English: Good drawers in here.

2246
03:14:33.450 --> 03:14:34.110
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah.

2247
03:14:37.470 --> 03:14:38.280
Bill Koeb: Nice one truck.

2248
03:14:42.600 --> 03:14:43.350
Raymond Bonilla: That's great.

2249
03:14:43.800 --> 03:14:44.310
Wow.

2250
03:14:46.260 --> 03:14:47.070
John English: Really like that.

2251
03:14:47.880 --> 03:14:48.360
Excellent.

2252
03:14:52.980 --> 03:14:53.460
John English: Good daddy.

2253
03:14:55.830 --> 03:14:56.430
John English: That's different.

2254
03:14:57.330 --> 03:14:58.260
John English: Wow. Nice.

2255
03:15:00.120 --> 03:15:02.550
Tim Trabon: Sentence. Very nice. Yeah.

2256
03:15:02.940 --> 03:15:05.040
Tim Trabon: Yeah, we could go ahead. No, go ahead. Right.

2257
03:15:05.520 --> 03:15:09.720
Raymond Bonilla: Now, does it say to people, you don't want to follow. Chris pain or felicity.

2258
03:15:11.220 --> 03:15:11.640
Oh, yeah.

2259
03:15:13.260 --> 03:15:13.950
John English: Great.

2260
03:15:16.530 --> 03:15:17.580
Raymond Bonilla: Hey Amanda that

2261
03:15:17.670 --> 03:15:19.440
John English: That's nice. Rebecca semester.

2262
03:15:22.200 --> 03:15:22.740
John English: Oh, man.

2263
03:15:22.980 --> 03:15:23.700
Raymond Bonilla: It is

2264
03:15:23.940 --> 03:15:26.670
Raymond Bonilla: This we'd have Thursday.

2265
03:15:27.960 --> 03:15:32.250
John English: Okay, the absolute most identifiable artist in the room.

2266
03:15:33.510 --> 03:15:36.240
John English: She wins every time you always know who's piece. It is

2267
03:15:37.020 --> 03:15:37.890
Raymond Bonilla: And that's a look

2268
03:15:38.730 --> 03:15:43.470
Raymond Bonilla: Look at that line on the left that strap. Oh my god.

2269
03:15:43.770 --> 03:15:44.670
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah, that's cool.

2270
03:15:45.210 --> 03:15:46.650
Raymond Bonilla: Why can't I do that guys

2271
03:15:49.110 --> 03:15:50.730
John English: Because you learn how not to

2272
03:15:51.300 --> 03:15:52.530
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah I know, right.

2273
03:15:53.610 --> 03:15:54.630
John English: That's really nice.

2274
03:15:56.070 --> 03:15:56.370
John English: Move.

2275
03:15:58.230 --> 03:15:59.130
John English: That's a killer one

2276
03:16:00.690 --> 03:16:01.020
Don Kilpatrick III: Yeah.

2277
03:16:01.350 --> 03:16:02.010
John English: That is good. It

2278
03:16:04.890 --> 03:16:05.700
John English: Reminds me of like

2279
03:16:05.730 --> 03:16:07.200
John English: pres putty knife drones.

2280
03:16:07.770 --> 03:16:08.220
Yeah.

2281
03:16:10.680 --> 03:16:11.940
Tim Trabon: That's like that handsome.

2282
03:16:13.260 --> 03:16:15.120
Tim Trabon: Handsome. Handsome flyboy

2283
03:16:16.140 --> 03:16:18.030
Tim Trabon: Sub caption is well hello hands.

2284
03:16:23.250 --> 03:16:24.150
John English: Very nice Alina.

2285
03:16:30.900 --> 03:16:31.530
Good.

2286
03:16:33.690 --> 03:16:34.290
John English: Okay. Where did the

2287
03:16:34.710 --> 03:16:39.240
Tim Trabon: Did I miss some. Oh, that's cool. Well, that that's part of the story.

2288
03:16:39.330 --> 03:16:40.590
John English: Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, it's

2289
03:16:40.590 --> 03:16:41.070
Raymond Bonilla: His wife.

2290
03:16:41.400 --> 03:16:42.390
John English: I didn't I, but I didn't.

2291
03:16:44.580 --> 03:16:46.380
John English: I didn't read that. Very nice. I didn't remove a bit

2292
03:16:46.380 --> 03:16:48.630
Tim Trabon: Of imagination. Yeah.

2293
03:16:49.680 --> 03:16:50.550
Bill Koeb: Whoa, good one.

2294
03:16:51.240 --> 03:16:51.900
John English: Nice Marcy

2295
03:16:56.760 --> 03:16:58.320
Raymond Bonilla: Alright guys,

2296
03:16:59.850 --> 03:17:00.420
That's good.

2297
03:17:02.700 --> 03:17:04.590
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, there you go.

2298
03:17:05.670 --> 03:17:06.060
Good one.

2299
03:17:10.680 --> 03:17:11.370
Bill Koeb: Oh, that's cool.

2300
03:17:13.560 --> 03:17:15.270
Raymond Bonilla: That you could do like a full on

2301
03:17:15.930 --> 03:17:17.490
Raymond Bonilla: With it. Yeah, like that. There it is.

2302
03:17:19.890 --> 03:17:20.340
Don Kilpatrick III: Nice.

2303
03:17:25.590 --> 03:17:26.250
Raymond Bonilla: Nice.

2304
03:17:26.760 --> 03:17:27.480
Cool.

2305
03:17:29.820 --> 03:17:30.240
Tim Trabon: Check.

2306
03:17:31.110 --> 03:17:34.860
John English: Jenna, Ray. I was just gonna, you know, he's like doing digital

2307
03:17:34.860 --> 03:17:37.590
John English: Right. And he did. The second post. Okay.

2308
03:17:43.410 --> 03:17:53.310
Tim Trabon: This is crazy. Jenna. Jenna just shared a link that is totally Mildred. I spent like three days like not full time but

2309
03:17:53.550 --> 03:17:54.870
Tim Trabon: A lot of time looking

2310
03:17:55.560 --> 03:17:57.720
Tim Trabon: For a photo of Mildred.

2311
03:17:57.960 --> 03:17:59.160
Raymond Bonilla: Reference and

2312
03:17:59.190 --> 03:18:03.450
Tim Trabon: Then Jenna shares this awesome photo like found it.

2313
03:18:06.690 --> 03:18:07.950
Raymond Bonilla: God showed up to me.

2314
03:18:08.010 --> 03:18:12.000
Tim Trabon: Like during a live broadcast found it in time to dry.

2315
03:18:15.540 --> 03:18:16.410
John English: I just had to

2316
03:18:16.440 --> 03:18:16.980
John English: couldn't help it.

2317
03:18:19.980 --> 03:18:21.510
Raymond Bonilla: I'd be angry if we did it john

2318
03:18:21.540 --> 03:18:23.490
John English: Hey, I'm finished drawing all night long. So

2319
03:18:24.900 --> 03:18:26.220
Raymond Bonilla: I'd be angry if you didn't

2320
03:18:28.050 --> 03:18:30.000
John English: That's fine. Cool. This Jonathan

2321
03:18:30.480 --> 03:18:30.960
Yeah.

2322
03:18:34.170 --> 03:18:36.720
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, good one and great, great.

2323
03:18:36.810 --> 03:18:38.940
John English: Really nice, good job. Excellent.

2324
03:18:41.580 --> 03:18:42.060
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah.

2325
03:18:42.540 --> 03:18:46.620
Tim Trabon: Yeah. JOHN before the end of the night follow that link. It's a great photo.

2326
03:18:48.840 --> 03:18:49.920
John English: Okay, when we get done with

2327
03:18:50.880 --> 03:18:52.260
Tim Trabon: The link. Yeah.

2328
03:19:01.200 --> 03:19:03.360
Tim Trabon: Awesome. I love the jacket.

2329
03:19:10.950 --> 03:19:11.520
Age nine

2330
03:19:14.940 --> 03:19:15.180
Good.

2331
03:19:17.280 --> 03:19:18.810
Really good. Very cool.

2332
03:19:25.260 --> 03:19:30.150
Tim Trabon: That's the visual arts passage shirt is someone's drawing and they age.

2333
03:19:31.980 --> 03:19:34.200
Tim Trabon: 32

2334
03:19:39.510 --> 03:19:41.160
Tim Trabon: Yeah yeah yeah

2335
03:19:41.400 --> 03:19:44.130
John English: I said I would do that until next year, which

2336
03:19:45.300 --> 03:19:47.400
John English: Mind changes from a five to six.

2337
03:19:47.850 --> 03:19:49.050
Tim Trabon: You ran out of time job.

2338
03:19:49.290 --> 03:19:52.590
John English: I know what I only I literally I only have

2339
03:19:53.790 --> 03:19:54.480
Tim Trabon: Four more

2340
03:19:54.690 --> 03:19:57.420
John English: A couple more 3045 days. Exactly.

2341
03:20:00.990 --> 03:20:03.750
Bill Koeb: This is nice word is already a six right he

2342
03:20:04.050 --> 03:20:04.890
John English: And October.

2343
03:20:05.190 --> 03:20:05.640
Yeah, less

2344
03:20:07.140 --> 03:20:07.950
Bill Koeb: Who, that's a nice girl.

2345
03:20:17.070 --> 03:20:17.700
Raymond Bonilla: Berto

2346
03:20:19.290 --> 03:20:21.570
Bill Koeb: Next year and stuff on is, you know,

2347
03:20:23.790 --> 03:20:24.480
John English: Very good.

2348
03:20:24.570 --> 03:20:25.470
horseshoes to

2349
03:20:31.680 --> 03:20:33.090
John English: I was I was loading the

2350
03:20:37.800 --> 03:20:38.160
Don Kilpatrick III: East

2351
03:20:38.580 --> 03:20:39.210
John English: Coast was

2352
03:20:39.450 --> 03:20:44.730
Tim Trabon: Bad. Wow. Then way to bring way to bring comedy to serious evening.

2353
03:20:46.050 --> 03:20:47.040
John English: It was Jimmy's favorite

2354
03:20:48.090 --> 03:20:54.570
Tim Trabon: Now these are these are suggested alright john you're you're you're rolling the dice now.

2355
03:20:54.630 --> 03:20:55.050
Okay.

2356
03:21:01.980 --> 03:21:02.940
Raymond Bonilla: Just got that.

2357
03:21:05.100 --> 03:21:09.690
Tim Trabon: Johnny English. The Evil Knievel of screen sharing. Yes.

2358
03:21:10.500 --> 03:21:11.940
Tim Trabon: Yes. Keep going.

2359
03:21:12.630 --> 03:21:15.600
Dale Stephanos: It's that that same here Hunter with Christopher Walken.

2360
03:21:15.960 --> 03:21:16.680
Tim Trabon: Oh, yeah.

2361
03:21:19.980 --> 03:21:22.590
Tim Trabon: Just keep clicking just see what happens.

2362
03:21:24.870 --> 03:21:25.620
Don Kilpatrick III: To that link.

2363
03:21:27.120 --> 03:21:28.080
John English: I found it. Yeah.

2364
03:21:29.520 --> 03:21:30.270
John English: Let me share it.

2365
03:21:30.810 --> 03:21:33.960
Tim Trabon: Sure, yeah. You should see it, it's cool.

2366
03:21:34.140 --> 03:21:34.770
John English: You trust me.

2367
03:21:35.850 --> 03:21:36.570
Tim Trabon: I mean I yeah

2368
03:21:36.630 --> 03:21:38.250
Tim Trabon: No, but go no

2369
03:21:39.660 --> 03:21:40.410
Tim Trabon: No, but I

2370
03:21:40.590 --> 03:21:41.430
Probably going to share

2371
03:21:43.860 --> 03:21:44.280
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

2372
03:21:44.790 --> 03:21:47.100
Tim Trabon: group dynamic dynamic for yeah

2373
03:21:47.640 --> 03:21:48.570
Don Kilpatrick III: It's so cool.

2374
03:21:48.960 --> 03:21:50.940
John English: All right, man. This was a fun night.

2375
03:21:51.090 --> 03:22:00.270
Tim Trabon: This is a fun one. That's good. All I will say is if if john and I put half as much work into preparing the next

2376
03:22:00.570 --> 03:22:02.010
Illustration isolation.

2377
03:22:03.390 --> 03:22:06.600
Tim Trabon: Our online school will probably go out of business.

2378
03:22:09.120 --> 03:22:11.070
Tim Trabon: So tonight, was a special night.

2379
03:22:11.130 --> 03:22:13.560
Tim Trabon: And glad we did. So next

2380
03:22:13.860 --> 03:22:24.780
John English: And I have many things to Terry for coming in. Chris, thank you so much for joining. I know you've already left. Amen. You're awesome appreciate you doing this with us.

2381
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John English: Don. Thank you again. Bill Kolb. Thank you.

2382
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John English: Gail. Thank you. And Timmy. Again, a lot of hard work went into this. I appreciate you putting so much

2383
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Tim Trabon: And and

2384
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Tim Trabon: The Tuskegee Airmen

2385
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Tim Trabon: Absolutely, yeah.

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Awesome. Yeah.

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John English: Next week,

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Already

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John English: Everyone be safe. All right.