Illustration Isolation: Episode 26, Figure Drawing Bryan Rodner Carr part V

About the episode: This episode features illustrators such as Bill Koeb, John English, and Raymond Bonilla. Watch them draw, join in the fun and share your progress as we paint and draw from amazing photo reference provided by photographer Bryan Rodner Carr. This is the 5th and final episode featuring Bryan’s amazing work and he will be missed. Next week will feature an entirely new photographer.

Topics discussed include design, shape, iconic photography, journalism, and just general goofing around amongst artist friends.

If you enjoy drawing with us on Thursdays, be sure to check out our Illustration Program, which starts Oct. 10.

You can learn more here >>

Bryan Rodner Carr is an American photographer and film editor currently based in Los Angeles, CA. His clients include major brands such as, Beats by Dre, Complex, Adidas, SSENSE, Reigning Champ, Goop, PAPER Magazine, FRAME, Richer Poorer, Paco Rabanne Parfums, Ipsy, Stella Artois, 7 For All Mankind, MATE the Label, Harper’s Bazaar, KkCo, LCD, Playboy Magazine, Spotify, Rolla’s Jeans, BB Dakota, REVOLVE , Wolf|Kasteler, Margaux Lonnberg, Luv AJ, Aprés Jewelry, Stellaire Collection, Forever 21, Refinery 29, Girl Skateboards, Contributor Magazine, NFL, Yahoo!, Factice Magazine, JADE Swim, For Love and Lemons, Nasty Gal, Kodak, Galore Magazine

Draw alongside these professional artists, ask questions, join the conversation, and most importantly — Share your work with us on social! Tag us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter and let us see what you’re up to, what you’re drawing, and how you tackled a few of these reference photos.

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Episode 26 Transcript:

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John English: Thank you, Bill.

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Bill Koeb: Thank you. I’ll see you soon.

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Everybody

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John English: Thank you for joining us tonight 26 or 27 or 25 or 26 to me, I always I lose track.

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John English: 26 episode 26

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That’s amazing man.

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John English: It shows you what a slacker Ray has been

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John English: Five or six times.

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Raymond Bonilla: Your episode right

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Tim Trabon: Here and he goes, Timmy. Are you in a camper.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, a lot has changed.

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John English: I’ll make you feel ready I re I still have I still live in a home.

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Raymond Bonilla: Born

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John English: haven’t lost yet.

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Raymond Bonilla: You still are wearing the same shirt that I saw it last time, so

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John English: Am I got to train on shirt on.

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Raymond Bonilla: Know, yeah.

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Tim Trabon: A lot of people don’t realize this but Raven. We never leave this webinar room where

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Tim Trabon: We do.

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Tim Trabon: We just unlock the gates once a week.

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John English: Well, hey, thank you everybody for joining us again, another episode 26 tonight re Binya bill co myself. And then there’s three or four other sit

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John English: Hope will eventually be here. I know they everybody’s working. Everyone’s got assignments or they’re teaching something’s going on. But you know, that’s that that’s

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John English: As part of it when you go after people that have big careers. You know, so hey. So what we’re going to do, I’m going to bounce through this real quickly.

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John English: Again, this is brought to you by visual arts passage, we’re going to be doing for poses tonight for 20 minute poses like always, we are drawing from this is our last night of drawing from Brian rod new car. I have a thank you for him here in a minute. I’ll bring him up.

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John English: Our classes for the visual arts passage start a week from this coming Saturday, October 10 real quickly. I just want to show you which I think this is a

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John English: Our, our program is designed to help people get started in the industry to help develop their careers. We’ve done a phenomenally good job of it just from some, some of the people that show up and draw with us with their careers that have been part of our education.

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John English: The first class process skill and craft. It’s taught by Audrey Benjamin said and

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John English: It is the physical aspect of making a picture. It is

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John English: The process of working with an art director to make a picture for a client, the skill sets and and information in that class.

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John English: Are very much the physical part of putting a picture together. You learn three value thumbnail value control simple color basic perspective.

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John English: Things that are very useful for you and you learn to work in that process. It makes you better immediately and it is the pipeline of the illustration world. It also exists in in

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John English: In game and movie development. I’ve had

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John English: Ian mccaig and Andy parks both comment said, yeah, this process is when when they are doing keyframe they go through this process.

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John English: But it’s also, he said, it’s not just with an art director, it’s with a committee and they joked about how many people that they have to appease along the way and they said it wish it was just an art director

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John English: The second second classes the cognitive side of picture making it’s learning to identify a problem starting taking text apart and then solving the problem either in a conceptual or or a

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John English: Narrative and it’s it again. It is the cognitive side of being an illustrator and visual storyteller. The next the next class, their portfolio classic. Oh, and Edward console. It teaches the

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John English: ideation visual storytelling class the next class is taught by Dale’s to found us and myself.

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John English: And it is portfolio and it’s when our students first define

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John English: Where they want to work in the industry and they’re actually identifying their audience who are the art directors and venues. They want to create an exit portfolio for

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John English: And so they’re making a commitment not only to themselves, but to instruct to the instructors that we can help them develop portfolio pieces aimed at the industry.

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John English: And functional portfolio. In the last class, stop by Sterling only and that’s putting it putting that portfolio in action. We are out pursuing the industry, you’re

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John English: Aligning your social media your online website you’re sending direct mail you’re learning how to crowdsource you’re learning kind of an entrepreneur, some entrepreneurial approaches to being an artist and living your life as an artist Sterling’s magnificent at it.

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John English: So that’s our program, we get started, a week from this Saturday.

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John English: We also have a concept design program that’s laid out very similar. The same idea. How do you develop the right skill sets for the industry.

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John English: And be an NA NA a solid exit portfolio. The goal in both cases is to make an art director, remember you for whatever it is you do our directors are the people you’re you’re trying to develop portfolio for

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John English: Tonight we’re in our drawing night if you have more questions if you have any questions you can reach Timmy and I you can sign up, Timmy. We’re still doing portfolio reviews next week if people are

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Tim Trabon: Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: Right. One thing I would say is I would enrollment closes October 8 but we’re definitely going to be selling out classes sooner than that. I know that there’s only like one spot left and ideation.

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Tim Trabon: Process, I think, has two spots. I mean, I think these are going to sell out pretty soon. So if you are considering signing up

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Tim Trabon: Either sign up right away or get in contact with new john ASAP. If you have questions, because you’re going to fill out. And once we add capacity.

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Tim Trabon: That’s it. So, highly recommend it.

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John English: All right, thank you to me.

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John English: Oh, here we are drawing again real simply I always I always put this up here because these are the people that have been great contributors Ray, you’re even on the list down there, down to the bottom right corner is is Ray work backwards is Dale stuff on us.

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John English: Vanessa Del Rey Ashley love it. Don Kilpatrick bill Kolb bills here tonight. I said, Bill is the

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John English: The Iron Man of our 26

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John English: Events. I think he’s been to everyone. He might have missed one along the way. Hector Casanova

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John English: Brent watkinson john foster myself Gil Ashby Audrey Benjamin Sandy and George Pratt.

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John English: Then we just had, I had, I didn’t want to redo the page. So I put

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John English: Which I thought he would be here tonight when you had to cancel because he just had he got an assignment that it has to work on.

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John English: This is Montalvo when shadow who’s joined us. The last few weeks. He’s phenomenal past student of mine that lives in San Paulo, Brazil, been friends with him since 1997

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John English: And he is a terrific artist who joined us. The last couple of weeks. And then, of course, Mr Payne and always thank you to the way brothers for being so kind and arthouse

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John English: To help us out introduce us to other photographers letting us use their work.

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John English: Been really good relationship. I thank you very much for doing so. And thank you to Brian riding your car for letting us use his work for this last month.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, and john like so we were going to move on to a new photographer. I TOLD JOHN I was like, Okay, I think we ready to move on John’s like know Brian posted new photos.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah. All right, one more week

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Tim Trabon: We got one more week with Brian I I don’t. The only other thing I’d say is, is like, you know, please share your work. I hope everybody. Hope you draw along with us this evening I you know

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Tim Trabon: That’s our favorite part of the night is at the end of the night, being able to check out. Everyone’s work. We want to see it.

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Tim Trabon: Art House, the weight brothers Brian or under car. These are all artists. They have their own businesses.

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Tim Trabon: A lot of thought went into the photo photography and they created please credit them, give them a shout out to helps them.

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Tim Trabon: And it’s really

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Tim Trabon: Rush Wade RTB to and art house. They’re, they’re running their own business and they’re really just doing this as goodwill friends. And so it’s really amazing that they do this for us.

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Tim Trabon: It takes a lot of weight off your shoulders, because we can always count on them to bring in this awesome photography. So just wanted to say that. Other than that, please share your work will be fun.

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John English: I’m gonna, I’m going to respond to that chat live and just say, Julian.

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John English: Thank you for saying that.

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John English: I’m glad it. It’s been a benefit to you and reach out to me do portfolio reviews with me some time.

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John English: You can review my portfolio.

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Tim Trabon: And regarding tags and everything as soon as we get going.

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Tim Trabon: all all all share that stuff. If you’re joining us for the first time tonight. I know a lot of you are

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Tim Trabon: You’ll want to go to our website and he’s got a backslash

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Tim Trabon: Photos I’ll share the link in the chat.

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Tim Trabon: Raymond Binya who has been

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Tim Trabon: gone for a while but

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John English: He’s back at

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John English: The mysterious Raymond Binya

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John English: Is going to be growing with us tonight.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, so I’ll share the link. We’re all drawn from the same photo. We do it sequentially. So photo at the top is the one we start with

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All right.

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John English: I’ll stop sharing

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John English: When I got it. I gotta do the tight Ray, tell me when you’re ready. I don’t want to hold

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Raymond Bonilla: Okay, yeah.

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John English: No, you pay me for extra minutes

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Raymond Bonilla: Just say Raven. Raven. He has a mystery to me too. So

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Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: Shout out to everybody that’s coming from live brush to join us.

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Raymond Bonilla: Shout out to my life crushers

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John English: A shadow

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John English: Shadow to live brush. Tell them what it is.

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Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: If you, if you’re trying to double down on your, your drawing nights I definitely, definitely check out live brush. It’s my staff and while Raymond Raymond john and I shared the link

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Next to me.

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John English: See how much we share

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Raymond Bonilla: I know. Well, you know,

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Tim Trabon: Try live

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Raymond Bonilla: Live brush did predate you know what illustration isolation. No, actually.

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What

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Tim Trabon: Will be sending receiving

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John English: Actually

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Tim Trabon: Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: It’s whoever gets a whoever gets a Wikipedia page. First, I think.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah yeah yeah

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John English: That’s fine.

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I got a

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John English: You’ve been listening to politics politicians too much.

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Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: I thought I’d give it a shot.

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Tim Trabon: Just claim it

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Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: Me too busy doing all these other things that you disagree with what I whatever I have to say.

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Bill Koeb: Should we go by age.

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John English: That’s right after you won your 15th Gold Medal, a society of illustrators. Right.

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Raymond Bonilla: After I Eclipse Gary Kelly.

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John English: You hit you hit the home run the Hamilton King Hall of Fame.

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John English: Same year

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, this is pretty well. That’s when I got the idea for like brush.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, you really became an iconic Illustrator.

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Tim Trabon: Soon as you started telling people you are an iconic

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Tim Trabon: That’s the trick.

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Raymond Bonilla: That’s true, yeah.

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John English: Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: What movie are you going john sorry

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John English: Yeah, no, it’s fine. I

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John English: I’m kind of distracted, but I’m going

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Tim Trabon: No, no, I was gonna say there is that Matt Damon.

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Tim Trabon: Movie. The informant. And they were like, you

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Tim Trabon: You lie to hundreds of people and you told them, you’re an orphan and Matt Damon’s like

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Tim Trabon: No, I, I told I only told a small lie to one person and they told everyone

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that that’s pretty much it confuses as a biography on my work on my life.

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Raymond Bonilla: My career. Goodness me

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Raymond Bonilla: Well, I’m super excited actually are now.

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Raymond Bonilla: Sit and say again, Bill.

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Bill Koeb: Is that when you tell people you’re internationally renowned

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah I I exist coast to coast on my parents a refrigerator.

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Bill Koeb: I mean like your

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Bill Koeb: I figure if you sell something to one European that

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Bill Koeb: You’re internationally renowned

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Raymond Bonilla: Or or someone in Canada.

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Bill Koeb: Or Canada. Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

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Bill Koeb: Well, you know, any, any yeah yeah anyway. Anyway, that’s just past the border or, you know, I mean, I’m from being from New

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Raymond Bonilla: York, you know anyone outside the tri state area.

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, it’s pretty much international waters for the New Yorkers.

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Tim Trabon: Also, if you’re tuning in for the first time tonight. Raymond. How long have you been gone like a month.

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Raymond Bonilla: So, well, my goodness. Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: We’re, we’re just excited to be able to tease and again so

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Raymond Bonilla: See you guys material saving it up.

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Tim Trabon: We’re not this usually intensely me

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I just wanted the viewers to know, you know, the

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Raymond Bonilla: That even bill called side showed up purposely to heckle me.

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Raymond Bonilla: Because it was requested that I’d be heckled

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, well,

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Raymond Bonilla: During his due diligence.

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John English: In all honesty.

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John English: Just so I can say this to the audience as much trouble as we’re giving you raise an amazing talent.

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John English: Yeah, he is. He is one heck of a painter and I’m really happy to have him join us.

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John English: So, and hopefully in a backhanded way that’s a real serious heckle because now the pressures on you right

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I know.

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Raymond Bonilla: He’s probably the best I’ve ever seen. And you’re about to be blown away.

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John English: I promise you the best piece that’s ever been done in illustration isolation is

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Raymond Bonilla: It’s about to happen.

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Raymond Bonilla: You think Chris pains. Good.

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John English: You had all the years right

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Bill Koeb: No pressure. No, no.

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Raymond Bonilla: No.

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Raymond Bonilla: Oh my god.

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Bill Koeb: So right right now.

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John English: There was a there was a great, I can’t remember what even what the name of the movie was it

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John English: It was the Johnny Cash movie with

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John English: Who play Johnny Cash, who’s the actor

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Joker.

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Raymond Bonilla: Walking

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John English: Walking

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John English: And

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John English: And

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John English: He was a

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John English: Pissed off.

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John English: Jerry Lee Lewis, he couldn’t he was, he wasn’t he wasn’t being

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John English: He wanted. He was being put back in the order of their performance on this circuit that I guess it was the. What was it called the chicken whatever circuit that they were traveling around doing these concerts and so

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John English: He just absolutely had he he opened for Elvis and just slayed the room and just killed them anyway walked off stage and was passing Elvis. He said he just looked at him. Because look, as it goes it. They’re all yours.

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John English: Beautifully done

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John English: It was struggling. I couldn’t remember everybody’s name, and I was trying to think I’m surprised I remember Jerry Lee Lewis his name. I’ve been at a very long day.

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Raymond Bonilla: Is it is a walk walk walk tall or something like that. Right.

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Tim Trabon: That’s that.

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Bill Koeb: Walk art.

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Tim Trabon: Walk the Line. But yeah, you

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Raymond Bonilla: Can walk the line. Yeah. Yeah. Right.

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John English: Right.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I thought I was gonna say, you know, like, you know, see if pain is walk the line.

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Raymond Bonilla: Ray is, you know, walk hard the duty story.

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Raymond Bonilla: Which is pretty much pretty accurate. I wouldn’t, I wouldn’t disagree on that.

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Raymond Bonilla: He’ll this enough to rile up the the crowd there. Would you say

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Raymond Bonilla: Has anybody seen that movie. It’s a pretty much a masterpiece.

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Bill Koeb: That’s a great movie. Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: John C. Reilly

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

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Bill Koeb: Let me traumatized because

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Bill Koeb: Like what I forget what happened in

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Raymond Bonilla: Any cut his brother. He got his brother and a half by accident. By spreading around a gigantic site at site or something like that.

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Raymond Bonilla: Paul said not to play around with it.

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Raymond Bonilla: Too well I’m super excited to finally be back after my long hiatus wish I was saying that I took a vacation but I

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Raymond Bonilla: I teach. So, and then I teach the classes right up against the illustration isolation, so

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Raymond Bonilla: I’ve had to

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, sit back and you know with my my hand and my cheek while I scroll through the wonderful Instagram posts, you know that that bombard my my stream every day.

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Raymond Bonilla: Of all the awesome work. So I was

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Raymond Bonilla: I got enough I got tired enough

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Raymond Bonilla: feeling horrible about myself and

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Raymond Bonilla: I, you know, got got my work done a little earlier, just so I can come in.

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Raymond Bonilla: And hang out everyone and then I

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Raymond Bonilla: Found out that everyone tried to actually make plans and JOHN. JOHN had to be here.

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Raymond Bonilla: Otherwise, you know, the lights would go on.

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John English: We’re here because you’re here.

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Raymond Bonilla: Well, according to Tim, you guys are always here. So, yeah.

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Tim Trabon: John very much. It is

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Tim Trabon: And Surprise, surprise.

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Tim Trabon: Looks like Montalvo is in the room.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: I missed the worst dancing.

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John English: Put a camera in that guy.

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Tim Trabon: Or it’s a could be a Russian bought in person maybe

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Tim Trabon: Now I’m pretty sure it’s Montalvo will see, hey, Mom.

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Montalvo Machado: Hey,

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Bill Koeb: Really is Montalvo

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Montalvo Machado: Yeah, I just just got into here just to say hi.

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John English: To draw

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John English: He heard there’s free heckling going on for

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Montalvo Machado: Stuff by the

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John English: Way down in San Paulo, Brazil.

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John English: Show up for that.

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Raymond Bonilla: Right, it’s like three probably three in the morning over there and

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Raymond Bonilla: No game just to just

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Raymond Bonilla: To heckle anything

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Raymond Bonilla: I appreciate them a dime and nice to meet you, man.

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Montalvo Machado: All right, it’s not so late. Here is just

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Montalvo Machado: treated by state.

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Raymond Bonilla: Okay.

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Tim Trabon: I was gonna say

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Tim Trabon: Raymond you guys around the same time zone.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. Over. He’s a bad. He’s an hour I had

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John English: To study art.

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. One time yeah I studied, aren’t you know

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I got some

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Montalvo Machado: Some things that just, you know, a lot of jobs coming this this month and I just really stopped by to say to say hi and see you guys join

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Tim Trabon: Oh, it’s so great to have you in the round.

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Raymond Bonilla: And no worries too long.

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Tim Trabon: We’re gonna lose half the audience when you sign off.

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John English: Become a regular since you’ve left

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Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: SO HE’S MY REPLACEMENT basically or my upgrade.

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John English: Upgrade is a better

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, we could do better and read think we could do better.

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Tim Trabon: Now Ramin I told you the rules. It’s that if you once you leave illustration isolation, you can do it anytime you have to replace yourself with someone better

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Right.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: Well, I’m okay with you.

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Montalvo Machado: I didn’t

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Raymond Bonilla: See

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Montalvo Machado: I didn’t read the letters on the contract. I should

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Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: That’s the thing is, the better you get the harder it is to get out of this contract.

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Raymond Bonilla: Timmy Timmy john tend to use very, very small font on their contract.

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John English: That’s what makes me such a good business partner.

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Tim Trabon: I can print really tiny.

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John English: Realized as an

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John English: Artist

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Need anything

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Tim Trabon: Yeah I know Ray, the time zone thing wasn’t surprising to me at all, but you got that so wrong.

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Raymond Bonilla: You know,

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Tim Trabon: That that is one of the things. Yeah, they don’t teach time zones that are at school. No.

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Raymond Bonilla: They do not

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Raymond Bonilla: I could do. I could I could paint on landscape Brazil.

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Raymond Bonilla: I could tell you whether I could pay the sunset. I just couldn’t tell you what time sunset is actually i i

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Tim Trabon: This is long ago enough that I don’t think I’ll get your information, but I was on the phone with Stephanie. It was calling about time zones once for the. They want to know what class was. And I was like, well, it’s

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Tim Trabon: I’m trying to remember what it was. They’re like, they’re calling from New York and I was like the the classes that

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Tim Trabon: I 4pm Pacific time. And they’re like, okay, yeah. No 4pm is great for me and I was like you said you’re in New York. Right. And they’re like, yeah, I was like, so they won’t be a 4pm

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Tim Trabon: You have to convert to the east and then now I’m on Pacific was like

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Tim Trabon: No, no, Pacific Pacific Ocean.

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You guys

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Raymond Bonilla: outside of Manhattan.

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Tim Trabon: Yeah, they call the

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Raymond Bonilla: Pacific time

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Tim Trabon: I was like, No, no, very polite like kind of be customer service or

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

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Tim Trabon: Well, I know the customer’s always right.

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Raymond Bonilla: I used to think I was from the south and

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Raymond Bonilla: I realized that I was actually just from Queens.

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Bill Koeb: Yeah, when I was in San Francisco. Everything East was the East Coast.

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Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

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Bill Koeb: On the other side of the bay. That was the East Coast.

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Tim Trabon: The east coast.

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John English: Ever the sunsets sunrises that’s all you gotta remember

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Raymond Bonilla: You. Right, right. That’s it. That’s all thing with New York

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Raymond Bonilla: You know, because I’m from Queens and everything like basically invalid and up like Westchester was considered upstate

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Raymond Bonilla: New York like oh that’s way upstate, you know, now I live in that in Buffalo, and it’s like just laughing at that idea because when I go home. I’m I

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Raymond Bonilla: You know I meet the family, friends, and they said, oh you from upstate i here goes. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it’s like, oh, you know, I have a cousin that lives in Westchester, I mean, that should be pretty close to you like when it’s about, like, about seven and a half hour drive away.

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Raymond Bonilla: Like what

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Raymond Bonilla: You said you live in New York.

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John English: It’s a long way up there. Yeah.

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Montalvo Machado: Well folks, I just, I have to do something here really just stopped by to say hi.

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Hey,

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Montalvo Machado: Just

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Montalvo Machado: Thank you.

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Montalvo Machado: All right.

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Montalvo Machado: All right.

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And Justin.

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Bieber.

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Montalvo Machado: Really just stopped by and I’m gonna I’m gonna mute here my mic in my camera, but I’ll be following you guys on the on the screen. Okay.

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Yeah.

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Montalvo Machado: Bye guys.

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Montalvo Machado: Enjoy.

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Alright.

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John English: The world’s nicest man.

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Raymond Bonilla: I know. He’s got it, he’s definitely an upgrade. He’s got a better beard, than I do more unified a

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Raymond Bonilla: Grade, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: I got great speckled all over the place. It’s got, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: Good night. Yeah. Yeah. And I’m lacking in here. I’m actually losing

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John English: Maybe it comes with like he’s Amanda international man of mystery.

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Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

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Raymond Bonilla: And one of these mysteries that you just don’t want to solve. Yeah. Do something later.

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Tim Trabon: That’s kind of the

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Tim Trabon: What

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John English: What was the most interesting man.

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Tim Trabon: Yes.

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Tim Trabon: The most interesting man alive.

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Tim Trabon: It does techies guy. Right. Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Tim Trabon: It’s the beard and the

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah, you can have one or the other.

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Raymond Bonilla: Or, you know, if you do only have the beer, then you have to go like the hostess sponsors and bow tie thing, kind of like

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Raymond Bonilla: Like an old timey

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Raymond Bonilla: Like barber or something like that.

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Raymond Bonilla: It’s just too much work.

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Raymond Bonilla: So I am

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Raymond Bonilla: Painting in Photoshop. Those you wondering

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Raymond Bonilla: I

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Raymond Bonilla: Paint. I usually paint in acrylics. I just, I teach right up until this point, so I don’t have time to grab all my stuff is I have to tear down my whole setup here which is

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Raymond Bonilla: Actually, you know, next time I should probably have charcoal everything like that setup so I shouldn’t be do that next time.

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Raymond Bonilla: John that pastor that you did that you posted was incredible, man.

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Thank you.

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Raymond Bonilla: And Bill’s been rocking the landscape paintings. That’s awesome. They look great.

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Bill Koeb: Thank you. Appreciate that. Yeah, it’s been nice to go out and do those

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Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I need to do.

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Raymond Bonilla: Need to get on a studio and do some

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Bill Koeb: You can watch your show the stuff that you posted about your show looks great.

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Raymond Bonilla: Thanks. Yeah.

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Raymond Bonilla: It’s one of those things you know when you

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Raymond Bonilla: You guys know it’s like sometimes you do work that

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Raymond Bonilla: Most people won’t really see the final product and two months later, because you’re on to the next thing, and that that’s done all have to do is just photograph and

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Raymond Bonilla: Ownership so it’s

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Raymond Bonilla: It’s nice to finally see that work again.

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Raymond Bonilla: So hopefully, you know,

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Raymond Bonilla: Also makes me feel that I need to

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Raymond Bonilla: You ever look at work from like an old show you, like, oh, I used to do that. Oh.

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Raymond Bonilla: Gosh, we’ll try that again. What, why did I stopped.

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Raymond Bonilla: Doing X y&z

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John English: Right, I looked at old painting. So I’ve done before and I don’t have any idea how I did.

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John English: I really don’t. It’s like

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John English: When did I have so much patience. You know, it’s like

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Right.

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Raymond Bonilla: I totally see that happening to me. I totally see that I’ve

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John English: Used to do all these, like, you know, real polished

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John English: Heads times and portraits and stuff. And it’s like, can I

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John English: I can’t do that anymore. I don’t think

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Raymond Bonilla: You feel

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Raymond Bonilla: Like my inner

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Raymond Bonilla: Peace I have like a little JPG, or that when I

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John English: Yeah.

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John English: What what not to do.

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Raymond Bonilla: Wonderful like it was that like

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Raymond Bonilla: Like lift out or

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John English: Yeah, it was an oil washed with the lift out

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Raymond Bonilla: Ah, okay. It’s kind of wonderful, wonderful texture is that on like was that on the illustration border.

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John English: Yep. I painted like I did like acrylic

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John English: Like all the big flatters are all painted flattened acrylic and they put oil washed over the whole thing.

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Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

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Raymond Bonilla: Awesome.

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John English: I saw somebody wants to do that.

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John English: I’m joking.

387
00:29:57.900 –> 00:29:59.640
Raymond Bonilla: He said he saw on TV, one time.

388
00:29:59.700 –> 00:30:03.420
John English: I saw it on TV, then Washington say Chris Payne guy figured out and

389
00:30:05.340 –> 00:30:07.500
John English: There was a whole group of artists that did that for a while.

390
00:30:08.310 –> 00:30:09.390
Bill Koeb: He saw it on YouTube.

391
00:30:09.690 –> 00:30:12.150
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, right. You said I need to. Yeah.

392
00:30:15.270 –> 00:30:21.000
John English: I’m gonna I’m gonna have to like to show anything here. I’m gonna have to like buy about an hour of

393
00:30:22.260 –> 00:30:23.400
John English: Johnny minutes here.

394
00:30:25.980 –> 00:30:27.240
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I picked a

395
00:30:29.220 –> 00:30:29.640
Raymond Bonilla: Great.

396
00:30:29.880 –> 00:30:33.120
Raymond Bonilla: This is a tough one. It’s so great that the

397
00:30:34.470 –> 00:30:36.270
Raymond Bonilla: Photos now. Oh my goodness.

398
00:30:36.570 –> 00:30:37.350
That is a great

399
00:30:38.520 –> 00:30:40.020
Raymond Bonilla: My Jam. Right. It’s probably week 12

400
00:30:41.040 –> 00:30:45.240
Raymond Bonilla: Brian’s of therapy or just, you know, and of course I’m now just coming into

401
00:30:46.740 –> 00:30:47.160
Raymond Bonilla: Seeing

402
00:30:47.760 –> 00:30:51.180
John English: This is week four, if you don’t hit the whole month with him.

403
00:30:51.870 –> 00:30:52.530
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, wow.

404
00:30:53.370 –> 00:30:54.090
He’s terrific.

405
00:31:00.330 –> 00:31:02.130
Raymond Bonilla: I was thinking, the other day I was like, man.

406
00:31:03.330 –> 00:31:03.570
Raymond Bonilla: Good.

407
00:31:05.460 –> 00:31:12.960
Raymond Bonilla: To me his dad’s photos. I go, I was thinking to myself, you know, I was walking down the street and I was, and I just popped in my head about how

408
00:31:13.500 –> 00:31:23.520
Raymond Bonilla: I was like, I saw that jack is still where it’s sort of smaller than one that Don did a really incredible piece. And I was like, man, I wish I would have

409
00:31:24.660 –> 00:31:30.840
Raymond Bonilla: I would have done that one or came in that day because i think i can i can swing by like at the very end.

410
00:31:32.160 –> 00:31:33.630
Raymond Bonilla: To heckle Dale for a little bit.

411
00:31:35.130 –> 00:31:35.670
Raymond Bonilla: Big leave

412
00:31:36.870 –> 00:31:41.070
Tim Trabon: A review round, I, I was on. So when we were starting to do all that I was on

413
00:31:42.810 –> 00:31:49.830
Tim Trabon: I was looking up the documentary to it because I’ve never seen the documentary that they were filming when they were

414
00:31:50.460 –> 00:31:52.440
Raymond Bonilla: They were, they were filming a documentary at the time.

415
00:31:52.890 –> 00:32:07.530
Tim Trabon: Yeah, and I believe it went. I mean, like, and it was like that predates like everybody like like i think i think for the most part it predates the distribution of like recorded content to homes. It had been like 1982

416
00:32:07.860 –> 00:32:09.870
Tim Trabon: Wow, so

417
00:32:11.550 –> 00:32:18.270
Tim Trabon: So they’re just weren’t. I mean, they’re outside of like a library there just weren’t that many VHS tapes, but I found somebody who

418
00:32:20.070 –> 00:32:26.760
Tim Trabon: They picked it up at like a garage sale. And then they digitized it and just like put it on YouTube.

419
00:32:27.810 –> 00:32:35.820
Tim Trabon: And and so I hit him up because they put up a really crummy version of it on YouTube, like bad and I was like, I need this more than you.

420
00:32:37.020 –> 00:32:38.310
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my goodness.

421
00:32:38.340 –> 00:32:39.540
Tim Trabon: Please, please.

422
00:32:40.560 –> 00:32:45.810
Tim Trabon: Consider selling it to me. You know, so they they they were really nice. I bought it from them.

423
00:32:47.250 –> 00:32:47.610
Tim Trabon: And

424
00:32:48.000 –> 00:32:49.950
John English: That’s good. Like you were

425
00:32:50.940 –> 00:32:51.390
John English: Oh,

426
00:32:51.780 –> 00:33:06.450
Tim Trabon: No, I was just like, I told the whole story. I was like, this is a really emotional thing like like I don’t think my dad even had a recording of it ever so I was like, I need this. So we, we got it. I haven’t. I’ve only like scrubbed through a couple parts of it.

427
00:33:06.630 –> 00:33:07.710
Raymond Bonilla: And I’m yeah yeah

428
00:33:07.920 –> 00:33:13.740
Tim Trabon: I scrub. They’re just enough of it to see that, like, a couple of those photos. My dad definitely was like behind the cinematographer

429
00:33:15.810 –> 00:33:16.680
Tim Trabon: Like he saw

430
00:33:16.980 –> 00:33:18.510
Tim Trabon: He was like this guy knows what he’s doing.

431
00:33:22.800 –> 00:33:24.510
John English: All of a sudden photographer, let it go.

432
00:33:24.540 –> 00:33:26.460
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that’s, that’s an idea.

433
00:33:26.460 –> 00:33:27.420
Raymond Bonilla: That’s nice to do

434
00:33:28.590 –> 00:33:35.070
Raymond Bonilla: In school, it’s like sitting behind like your teacher whether painting along and just copying their painting nice do that.

435
00:33:36.120 –> 00:33:38.610
John English: A lot last week kind of jokingly talking about

436
00:33:39.630 –> 00:33:46.410
John English: At the academy. I was sitting next to George Pratt and then when everybody got up and walked around I’m finished my growing by looking at your service.

437
00:33:46.470 –> 00:33:49.860
Raymond Bonilla: Correct, yeah. Yeah, exactly. Okay, I could just give it to this.

438
00:33:50.730 –> 00:33:53.580
John English: Little not not on the designer anything or the dry it’s just

439
00:33:53.760 –> 00:33:56.550
John English: You had all the information there because he drew dresser damn fast.

440
00:34:01.770 –> 00:34:02.610
John English: To find out

441
00:34:08.850 –> 00:34:10.080
John English: About two more minutes. Right.

442
00:34:10.410 –> 00:34:11.220
Raymond Bonilla: Okay, yeah.

443
00:34:11.700 –> 00:34:12.960
John English: What will that help

444
00:34:13.020 –> 00:34:15.510
Raymond Bonilla: Or without yeah yeah it’s

445
00:34:15.870 –> 00:34:17.010
John English: Gonna help me much but

446
00:34:18.720 –> 00:34:22.680
Raymond Bonilla: It’ll. It’ll any anytime is appreciated.

447
00:34:23.970 –> 00:34:24.510
Just

448
00:34:26.820 –> 00:34:28.680
Raymond Bonilla: Having having fun. This

449
00:34:35.730 –> 00:34:41.970
Raymond Bonilla: Trying to get this thinking a lot. This is actually doing these paintings. Last time I was there.

450
00:34:43.350 –> 00:34:47.550
Raymond Bonilla: I drew alongside everyone I think George was there and

451
00:34:50.910 –> 00:34:51.960
Raymond Bonilla: Photography, we were doing.

452
00:34:53.580 –> 00:34:54.870
Raymond Bonilla: I think was right after the

453
00:34:56.130 –> 00:34:58.350
Raymond Bonilla: Wayans brothers, um,

454
00:34:59.040 –> 00:35:02.250
John English: What was the beginning of Brian then because we did he followed them.

455
00:35:02.820 –> 00:35:07.680
Raymond Bonilla: Okay, so then it was okay. So then I did do the first time before is Brian

456
00:35:10.230 –> 00:35:10.680
Raymond Bonilla: And

457
00:35:12.390 –> 00:35:30.960
Raymond Bonilla: Just the shapes that I got from the tag made me think a lot about simplifying my my my paintings and how I can actually get get that idea into my my actual work. That’s why I’m doing this again because it really helps inform mom.

458
00:35:31.410 –> 00:35:33.930
John English: That’s a good conversation. I know that that

459
00:35:35.250 –> 00:35:48.930
John English: You work you shoot photo reference and work from photo reference and you manipulate photo reference with your reference. I mean, you obviously work on the photo reference before you start your drawing and everything.

460
00:35:49.320 –> 00:35:51.600
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I’ve been you know quite a bit.

461
00:35:51.750 –> 00:35:59.670
John English: I have gotten the point where I do the same thing with my landscape work because I get as much I manipulate the design of the photography

462
00:36:01.080 –> 00:36:09.540
John English: Kind of to my liking into my needs. I, I changed the shapes value value control the whole piece or value adjustments.

463
00:36:09.990 –> 00:36:10.440
Right.

464
00:36:11.520 –> 00:36:11.760
Raymond Bonilla: And

465
00:36:14.370 –> 00:36:15.480
John English: And I’m going to mention that

466
00:36:16.080 –> 00:36:16.980
Raymond Bonilla: Because I yeah

467
00:36:17.070 –> 00:36:29.010
John English: One of the things we didn’t talk about is, and I don’t want to get too far because it’s not going to happen right away but race teaching a class with us next in the middle of next semester. And the reason I do that.

468
00:36:29.820 –> 00:36:33.510
Raymond Bonilla: Yes. Yeah. Yes. Oh yeah, it’s gonna be a lot of fun.

469
00:36:34.980 –> 00:36:36.270
Raymond Bonilla: I’m really amped about that.

470
00:36:37.770 –> 00:36:40.260
Raymond Bonilla: From paint a pixel I painting.

471
00:36:42.900 –> 00:36:50.070
John English: What I what I like about Ray teaching that classes. He can’t come in here and say, because it’s on Saturday. You can’t come and say I was teaching

472
00:36:51.240 –> 00:36:53.190
Raymond Bonilla: Right. Yeah, I don’t have any excuses.

473
00:36:55.980 –> 00:36:57.150
Raymond Bonilla: Doing excuse

474
00:36:59.220 –> 00:37:01.800
Raymond Bonilla: Me on Tuesday or Tuesday, that’s

475
00:37:02.700 –> 00:37:04.980
John English: All I knows it’s not a Thursday, it’s

476
00:37:05.280 –> 00:37:06.000
Raymond Bonilla: Thursday now.

477
00:37:08.070 –> 00:37:10.080
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, my semester and

478
00:37:11.490 –> 00:37:15.300
Raymond Bonilla: I think that week. So the first week then we started the class, and it’s not even

479
00:37:16.470 –> 00:37:18.270
Raymond Bonilla: You know, I have no excuse, basically.

480
00:37:19.590 –> 00:37:20.910
John English: That’s kind of where I was going with it.

481
00:37:21.240 –> 00:37:22.080
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

482
00:37:22.620 –> 00:37:23.220
Tim Trabon: Well, you know,

483
00:37:24.360 –> 00:37:27.450
Tim Trabon: I should sit down. It’s like that class is almost sold out.

484
00:37:30.450 –> 00:37:33.990
Raymond Bonilla: Is it. Wow, that’s awesome. Yeah. Wow what’s

485
00:37:34.050 –> 00:37:35.370
John English: That I know there’s teaching it.

486
00:37:36.240 –> 00:37:39.780
Raymond Bonilla: I know it’s like, Are you sure. Okay, maybe we’ll spend this next

487
00:37:42.690 –> 00:37:45.960
Raymond Bonilla: This next pose explaining the reasons why.

488
00:37:50.370 –> 00:37:52.260
Raymond Bonilla: You probably shouldn’t take the class.

489
00:37:54.720 –> 00:37:55.650
Raymond Bonilla: With john I’m sad.

490
00:37:56.880 –> 00:37:59.490
John English: I’m not that good. We’re good.

491
00:38:01.020 –> 00:38:01.890
Bill Koeb: That’s good, man.

492
00:38:03.630 –> 00:38:04.320
Raymond Bonilla: Thanks, Bill.

493
00:38:05.760 –> 00:38:07.350
Raymond Bonilla: pricey cranking them out.

494
00:38:07.650 –> 00:38:08.430
John English: That’s beautiful.

495
00:38:14.070 –> 00:38:15.690
Raymond Bonilla: That’s that looks awesome though.

496
00:38:16.470 –> 00:38:17.100
Bill Koeb: Oh, thanks.

497
00:38:17.130 –> 00:38:19.350
John English: Bill always gets there really fast too.

498
00:38:19.920 –> 00:38:22.710
Raymond Bonilla: I know he’s on like tone paper and

499
00:38:24.570 –> 00:38:26.550
John English: So my but I’m not getting a really fast.

500
00:38:30.420 –> 00:38:30.930
John English: I’m just

501
00:38:32.190 –> 00:38:33.150
John English: Change cameras.

502
00:38:33.630 –> 00:38:35.550
Bill Koeb: To get details that I don’t so

503
00:38:37.980 –> 00:38:40.560
Raymond Bonilla: That’s the mighty Undo button. No, no.

504
00:38:42.540 –> 00:38:45.840
Bill Koeb: I can you use the gray of the background.

505
00:38:48.060 –> 00:38:49.770
Bill Koeb: Is your shadow, you know, your mid tone.

506
00:38:50.580 –> 00:38:51.960
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

507
00:38:53.220 –> 00:39:00.720
Raymond Bonilla: Thanks. I was looking at a, at an old teacher. My name is set to move to Takeshima at the Academy of why I don’t know john. Have you ever met him.

508
00:39:00.960 –> 00:39:04.560
John English: To go to have not. I don’t believe I have is

509
00:39:05.070 –> 00:39:07.020
Raymond Bonilla: My dad talk about an incredible artist.

510
00:39:08.910 –> 00:39:09.600
Raymond Bonilla: He would

511
00:39:11.130 –> 00:39:18.930
Raymond Bonilla: When it is very quick studies, he would use the tone middle tone to work into his, his piece.

512
00:39:21.300 –> 00:39:30.420
Raymond Bonilla: And it was just sort of it, it was, it would go in and out of this painting like beautifully. He would you couldn’t even tell at first, and then, you know,

513
00:39:31.470 –> 00:39:35.880
Raymond Bonilla: If you looked at you like, oh my goodness, that’s a Middletown because he didn’t know the appearance of it would change all the time.

514
00:39:38.850 –> 00:39:41.490
Raymond Bonilla: So I’m basically just copying what he did.

515
00:39:44.220 –> 00:39:45.900
Raymond Bonilla: actually more like stealing. But, you know,

516
00:39:47.280 –> 00:39:51.090
Bill Koeb: Well, it’s nice because you have like for you have for value set up, you know, and

517
00:39:51.780 –> 00:39:52.200
Right.

518
00:39:54.630 –> 00:40:04.710
Bill Koeb: And it just you know you going shapes down. You got a sense of light on the air and a sense of light on her clothes, you know, but

519
00:40:07.290 –> 00:40:18.030
Bill Koeb: All the dark and all the darks interface that just really, you know, pull you pull you up to that I like, I like the wider the shirt, how it’s highlighted there.

520
00:40:18.870 –> 00:40:20.880
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah you there is some

521
00:40:22.050 –> 00:40:24.030
Raymond Bonilla: This Dean Cornwell

522
00:40:25.860 –> 00:40:27.600
Raymond Bonilla: I don’t know if it was a captain blood painting.

523
00:40:28.710 –> 00:40:29.370
Raymond Bonilla: Where

524
00:40:29.400 –> 00:40:29.880
Raymond Bonilla: You have you ever

525
00:40:30.000 –> 00:40:30.690
Raymond Bonilla: Do the book.

526
00:40:32.550 –> 00:40:49.860
Raymond Bonilla: Visions of adventure. I think it’s called. It’s a lot read Brandywine artists book and on this on the inside is this fold out page with like a dean Cornwell where he basically did it was I got to see if I can find it.

527
00:40:51.510 –> 00:40:57.120
Raymond Bonilla: He, he took he had like a pirate. It was like a black, white, and like yellow

528
00:40:57.840 –> 00:41:13.050
Raymond Bonilla: As one of those types of, like, black, white, and the color pennies. And so he had one were a pirate was sort of thinking and the pirates local value of his face had the sun beat in look to it. It was a black beard like kind of dark middle tarnish

529
00:41:14.640 –> 00:41:27.660
Raymond Bonilla: Flash and and his shirt was was was a white shirt and his like control of local value was like so incredible like the design just

530
00:41:28.620 –> 00:41:40.380
Raymond Bonilla: Read from a million miles away because everything has its own value. And I always start like I love that you could, and I saw that and a lot of like the 19th century artists like like Casas Ramon costs us and

531
00:41:41.370 –> 00:41:49.830
Raymond Bonilla: You know, Zorn would do that all the time and it takes so much restraint, though, because you want to throw in a billion values and thick 20 minutes you know it’s not

532
00:41:52.050 –> 00:42:01.980
Raymond Bonilla: It’s a, it’s not that hard. It’s, it’s hard to not it’s easy to restrain yourself you know a lot easier than if he had like 20 days.

533
00:42:02.490 –> 00:42:12.180
Bill Koeb: Well, like when people start drawing, you know, you see a lot of beginning artists, where you they’re trying to get all the values down there trying to put every single value in

534
00:42:12.630 –> 00:42:13.980
Bill Koeb: Right and

535
00:42:14.280 –> 00:42:14.850
Tim Trabon: I’m sorry.

536
00:42:15.510 –> 00:42:16.170
John English: I’m just not going on.

537
00:42:16.800 –> 00:42:17.730
John English: Right now, hold on.

538
00:42:18.330 –> 00:42:22.320
Tim Trabon: I was gonna I before we get moving because I can see bill is

539
00:42:23.640 –> 00:42:25.350
Tim Trabon: Bills getting going on the next

540
00:42:25.950 –> 00:42:27.300
Raymond Bonilla: Bills on his third one already.

541
00:42:28.260 –> 00:42:29.730
Raymond Bonilla: Generation. Yeah.

542
00:42:29.760 –> 00:42:41.340
Tim Trabon: No, I just want everybody in the ice. And so this is the time where I kind of tour the room while I’m doing that, please share your work. You can post on Instagram. Share with us on the Facebook group.

543
00:42:42.720 –> 00:42:57.960
Tim Trabon: I just put in the chat and the what we would like for you to tag. So we can check it out at the end of the night, please do. It’s really special to be able to see all these different interpretations and different perspectives.

544
00:42:59.340 –> 00:43:02.880
Tim Trabon: Cool. Yeah, I could see somebody shared their, their handle

545
00:43:03.900 –> 00:43:14.130
Tim Trabon: Yeah, if you go to the hashtag illustration isolation on Instagram really great place to see see and meet a bunch of cool artists. It’s really fun community so

546
00:43:14.700 –> 00:43:15.510
Tim Trabon: How do you go

547
00:43:15.750 –> 00:43:16.500
John English: On there too.

548
00:43:17.160 –> 00:43:18.930
Tim Trabon: Yeah, yeah, a lot of great demos.

549
00:43:19.980 –> 00:43:22.170
Tim Trabon: But Bill is up next. If you’re a

550
00:43:23.400 –> 00:43:34.350
Tim Trabon: If you’re going to draw with us. Be sure to hit refresh. So you’ll see the next photo. It’s the young woman in the white tank top and

551
00:43:35.490 –> 00:43:41.940
Tim Trabon: It was out of order before, so be sure to hit refresh. She’s kind of pulling the shirt up her side, so

552
00:43:43.380 –> 00:43:49.080
Tim Trabon: Other than that, we’re ready to go but john I’m going to stop by and see what you’re drawing. Okay.

553
00:43:56.610 –> 00:43:57.330
Bill Koeb: Looks cool

554
00:44:00.000 –> 00:44:00.480
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

555
00:44:02.550 –> 00:44:04.050
Bill Koeb: Here’s what I did, from the last one.

556
00:44:04.830 –> 00:44:05.340
Cool.

557
00:44:07.290 –> 00:44:08.460
Bill Koeb: Interface to but

558
00:44:10.350 –> 00:44:12.420
Bill Koeb: It set up shot you know where it’s hard to get

559
00:44:14.280 –> 00:44:16.110
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, who picked that reference, geez.

560
00:44:17.400 –> 00:44:18.600
John English: I don’t know. Sorry about that.

561
00:44:21.060 –> 00:44:21.840
Raymond Bonilla: But that guy.

562
00:44:23.250 –> 00:44:23.790
Yeah, right.

563
00:44:25.110 –> 00:44:26.190
John English: All the references we

564
00:44:27.900 –> 00:44:29.670
Raymond Bonilla: See planes to Brian

565
00:44:30.120 –> 00:44:35.010
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, no, I mean like, Who. Who is the artist that decided he wanted to draw that right like

566
00:44:36.450 –> 00:44:37.380
Raymond Bonilla: It’s more so that

567
00:44:38.820 –> 00:44:39.270
John English: That was a

568
00:44:40.680 –> 00:44:43.620
John English: Close. I want to work. I’m going to finish this one I like it.

569
00:44:44.700 –> 00:44:45.510
John English: Good post

570
00:44:46.860 –> 00:44:47.640
Raymond Bonilla: It’s got that.

571
00:44:50.550 –> 00:44:51.000
John English: Got a great

572
00:44:51.240 –> 00:45:04.200
Raymond Bonilla: Day. Yeah, and it’s got such a wonderful set of shapes. That’s just it. You know what it reminds me of like the Chicago style illustration. You know, like Loomis some bloom like that type of like flattery.

573
00:45:05.160 –> 00:45:05.430
Is

574
00:45:06.870 –> 00:45:09.780
John English: Kind of a Coby Whitmore model feel to it, you know.

575
00:45:09.900 –> 00:45:11.100
Raymond Bonilla: Totally, totally

576
00:45:12.300 –> 00:45:13.260
Raymond Bonilla: Built for design.

577
00:45:13.620 –> 00:45:15.390
Tim Trabon: One of the things if you give

578
00:45:16.410 –> 00:45:24.480
Tim Trabon: If you give Brian. A follow on Instagram. One of the things I kind of quickly learned is all of these, these are very established models.

579
00:45:26.070 –> 00:45:27.870
Tim Trabon: That he’s photographed I

580
00:45:29.190 –> 00:45:31.410
Tim Trabon: Mean, he catches them in such a natural way.

581
00:45:33.600 –> 00:45:43.410
Tim Trabon: But yeah, it was to me. It was educational to realize like, oh, wow, these are because you start to see the people he’s tagging and these are

582
00:45:45.000 –> 00:45:49.320
Tim Trabon: Professional they’re absolutely professionals like in every sense of it.

583
00:45:51.120 –> 00:45:52.500
Is no surprise that question.

584
00:45:53.760 –> 00:45:55.560
John English: You talking about us is that is it.

585
00:45:55.950 –> 00:45:56.340
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

586
00:45:56.670 –> 00:45:57.930
Raymond Bonilla: He was. Yeah, yeah.

587
00:46:02.070 –> 00:46:03.000
Raymond Bonilla: Every time I show up.

588
00:46:10.080 –> 00:46:11.550
Raymond Bonilla: Every Timmy, you were saying like the

589
00:46:13.590 –> 00:46:18.210
Raymond Bonilla: You know, like the models. I mean, you could tell they know how to move in space.

590
00:46:18.870 –> 00:46:20.520
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, no question.

591
00:46:21.420 –> 00:46:30.900
John English: Is selection of models is superb the route, they’re not. I MEAN, OBVIOUSLY BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE, but they’re very interesting looking people right

592
00:46:31.890 –> 00:46:44.880
John English: Now I you go back and you look at, like, people that I love great drawings of, you know, they did portraits like of somebody like fetching her whole buying and great drawers.

593
00:46:46.050 –> 00:46:51.270
John English: They had a great you know they wouldn’t put pick a really average looking person to draw

594
00:46:52.650 –> 00:46:56.520
John English: The face. These were really beautifully designed on their own, you know,

595
00:46:58.890 –> 00:47:01.770
Raymond Bonilla: When it goes to show you like how like

596
00:47:03.210 –> 00:47:08.160
Raymond Bonilla: They had a good show you like how just a good model actually, you know,

597
00:47:09.240 –> 00:47:12.030
Raymond Bonilla: Is is wanting becomes well known around around that.

598
00:47:13.200 –> 00:47:20.550
Raymond Bonilla: Around a given community, especially around that time like they had a whole, like, I went to. I was at the Art Institute of the MFA.

599
00:47:22.620 –> 00:47:24.360
Raymond Bonilla: I think last summer, actually, and

600
00:47:26.670 –> 00:47:31.470
Raymond Bonilla: I saw a was loosely trek show what they did a

601
00:47:32.550 –> 00:47:33.360
Raymond Bonilla: Like this sort of

602
00:47:35.670 –> 00:47:46.470
Raymond Bonilla: I guess story. This whole little part of the exhibition that was devoted to just this one model is an actress. Her name escapes me but they had like four or five paintings

603
00:47:47.850 –> 00:47:53.520
Raymond Bonilla: From all the like all the different artists work like you could tell like just these beautiful renditions of this model and

604
00:47:54.000 –> 00:48:09.390
Raymond Bonilla: Everyone’s a knockout just in terms of design and like, yeah, just the flow of things and it’s just you could tell that the model sort of the pictures for them. Like, it just makes them. They paint themselves, you know, with certain when you get a certain person like that.

605
00:48:09.840 –> 00:48:17.940
John English: I remember well look at it. I always get a kick out of this because the guy’s name is also Sterling, the

606
00:48:19.260 –> 00:48:24.480
John English: model. That model that was lying Decker’s model male model that they’re all the arrow shirt, you know,

607
00:48:24.540 –> 00:48:25.650
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah, yeah.

608
00:48:25.860 –> 00:48:29.070
John English: He looks just like Sterling Halima models name with Sterling.

609
00:48:33.690 –> 00:48:34.920
Bill Koeb: Nation.

610
00:48:35.310 –> 00:48:37.320
Tim Trabon: Sure, certainly didn’t have like a side gig.

611
00:48:37.620 –> 00:48:42.960
John English: Wow. Skip thinking maybe still grandfather. He was named after his grandfather, the arrow shirt model.

612
00:48:46.200 –> 00:48:53.370
John English: Models, you know, choosing interesting faces to tell us to draw. It’s like, you know, think about

613
00:48:54.540 –> 00:49:00.900
John English: You know, like something like drawing know Matt Damon’s a good looking guy, but compared drawing Matt Damon to Adrian Brody

614
00:49:01.140 –> 00:49:04.050
Tim Trabon: I was gonna say I was thinking, Adrian Brody this whole time.

615
00:49:04.170 –> 00:49:06.780
John English: He’s like the most interesting face ever, you know, for

616
00:49:07.290 –> 00:49:07.680
Yeah.

617
00:49:09.330 –> 00:49:09.750
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

618
00:49:12.810 –> 00:49:14.100
John English: Funny story about him.

619
00:49:16.800 –> 00:49:19.620
John English: One summer need a cadence was saying, hey, my friend.

620
00:49:20.790 –> 00:49:29.100
John English: And she she kind of told it knowing the outcome, but she kept saying my friend keeps messaging me saying, My gosh, my, my son’s finally got a

621
00:49:30.450 –> 00:49:35.820
John English: He’s got a part. And it turned out she kept talking about them all summer long and Turkey was Adrian Brody

622
00:49:37.950 –> 00:49:40.230
John English: She was friends with with Adrian’s mother.

623
00:49:41.430 –> 00:49:42.120
Tim Trabon: Oh, wow.

624
00:49:42.390 –> 00:49:43.350
Raymond Bonilla: That’s funny.

625
00:49:46.110 –> 00:49:48.630
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah and you know it’s a lot of interesting people.

626
00:49:49.800 –> 00:49:50.430
Bill Koeb: Say,

627
00:49:50.820 –> 00:49:51.240
Yeah.

628
00:49:52.380 –> 00:49:54.360
Bill Koeb: I know she knows Ralph Steadman

629
00:49:55.530 –> 00:49:56.820
Raymond Bonilla: She does. Oh, wow.

630
00:49:58.350 –> 00:50:02.130
Tim Trabon: Let’s be careful about going through other people’s Rolodexes

631
00:50:07.170 –> 00:50:07.590
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

632
00:50:09.450 –> 00:50:11.520
John English: Okay, I’ll get I’ll bring it in a little bit.

633
00:50:16.200 –> 00:50:16.410
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

634
00:50:18.870 –> 00:50:25.140
Tim Trabon: I yeah you heard it here first. Please, please forward, whatever you heard on to the person we’re talking about

635
00:50:28.080 –> 00:50:29.070
John English: It’s true story.

636
00:50:29.670 –> 00:50:31.050
Tim Trabon: Is right. I know.

637
00:50:34.050 –> 00:50:43.530
John English: I didn’t embellish it or champ down completed my my father’s favorite model from Detroit was Bill Bixby if you know

638
00:50:44.190 –> 00:50:44.880
Bill Koeb: Oh, yeah.

639
00:50:45.090 –> 00:50:47.100
John English: Oh wow, original

640
00:50:47.430 –> 00:50:48.870
Bill Koeb: Yeah, father.

641
00:50:49.350 –> 00:50:49.680
Yeah.

642
00:50:50.730 –> 00:50:51.840
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my goodness.

643
00:50:51.960 –> 00:50:58.170
John English: He modeled. He started a bill started in Detroit and he modeled for all the car companies did all

644
00:50:58.290 –> 00:51:01.680
Raymond Bonilla: I was gonna say, did he did it matter for the car companies. Wow, that’s cool.

645
00:51:02.880 –> 00:51:03.810
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, it’s so awesome.

646
00:51:05.250 –> 00:51:06.750
Raymond Bonilla: Who was that it was that model.

647
00:51:07.890 –> 00:51:15.390
Raymond Bonilla: How my god I’m like blanking on him. Did all the Doc Samson’s and like all the Bama covers and like he showed up and

648
00:51:15.720 –> 00:51:17.910
John English: I can’t think of his name, but I know you’re talking about

649
00:51:17.940 –> 00:51:18.360
Yeah.

650
00:51:19.710 –> 00:51:26.040
Raymond Bonilla: He’s another one that just showed up and shows up, everyone’s work around that time you know all the paperback books and

651
00:51:28.590 –> 00:51:30.300
John English: He was Fabio before five. Yeah.

652
00:51:30.930 –> 00:51:32.040
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

653
00:51:33.750 –> 00:51:44.850
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I met I met Elaine’s Emilio one time and it was a trip to meter, you know, and I wanted to, I know she probably you know answers that

654
00:51:45.480 –> 00:51:53.790
Raymond Bonilla: People ask her about the Fabio thing. Those who don’t know the lane to Twilio is or actually even Fabio. I guess it’s really going to matter right if you didn’t know, Fabio was but

655
00:51:55.470 –> 00:51:56.550
Raymond Bonilla: He was the

656
00:51:57.600 –> 00:51:58.500
John English: Romance.

657
00:51:58.650 –> 00:52:00.330
Raymond Bonilla: The romance. Yeah.

658
00:52:01.020 –> 00:52:04.080
Bill Koeb: I saw Fabio once in Los Angeles.

659
00:52:05.370 –> 00:52:08.610
John English: Before before after the accident.

660
00:52:10.170 –> 00:52:12.360
Bill Koeb: Well, this was like 25 years ago so

661
00:52:12.990 –> 00:52:13.410
Bill Koeb: Before

662
00:52:14.130 –> 00:52:15.240
Raymond Bonilla: You had an accident.

663
00:52:16.560 –> 00:52:17.460
John English: He got hit by a

664
00:52:18.750 –> 00:52:20.160
Tim Trabon: Brutal it’s brutal.

665
00:52:21.630 –> 00:52:23.640
John English: Like a ferris wheel and he got hit by a bird.

666
00:52:23.880 –> 00:52:24.090
Bill Koeb: It was

667
00:52:25.080 –> 00:52:26.430
Tim Trabon: It was a roller coaster and it

668
00:52:26.430 –> 00:52:26.700
John English: Worked

669
00:52:26.820 –> 00:52:30.360
Tim Trabon: On a small, it wasn’t. It was a serious injury.

670
00:52:30.540 –> 00:52:31.290
Oh, absolutely.

671
00:52:33.330 –> 00:52:33.870
Yeah.

672
00:52:35.970 –> 00:52:38.670
John English: Can you imagine that I mean his face was his life.

673
00:52:40.410 –> 00:52:43.830
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. To me, it’s not guilty, like you have

674
00:52:44.160 –> 00:52:44.790
Tim Trabon: To watch it.

675
00:52:47.520 –> 00:52:48.120
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

676
00:52:49.200 –> 00:52:49.920
Tim Trabon: I used to

677
00:52:50.340 –> 00:52:52.380
Tim Trabon: Photo assist all the time and

678
00:52:52.470 –> 00:52:54.480
Raymond Bonilla: It was your first there was your first gig.

679
00:52:55.380 –> 00:52:59.160
Tim Trabon: Now I i was i i would do we do like, you know,

680
00:52:59.610 –> 00:53:01.650
Tim Trabon: Clothing brochures and stuff like that.

681
00:53:03.390 –> 00:53:03.780
Tim Trabon: And

682
00:53:04.860 –> 00:53:19.320
Tim Trabon: So I always hated whenever like I would have to help would models and stuff you’d be like, the most beautiful people I’ve ever met. And then somebody like always take a photo of me looking like a moron next

683
00:53:20.670 –> 00:53:23.310
Tim Trabon: I got like a whole foot shorter and

684
00:53:23.790 –> 00:53:27.030
Tim Trabon: All like all sweaty and tired.

685
00:53:30.240 –> 00:53:31.680
John English: Get the gaffer out of there.

686
00:53:31.950 –> 00:53:38.820
Tim Trabon: Yeah, it was all there’s nothing you could feel great. It could be your best day and you accidentally get taken a photo like that.

687
00:53:40.020 –> 00:53:41.790
Tim Trabon: You like I still think about it.

688
00:53:42.630 –> 00:53:43.290
Oh,

689
00:53:47.130 –> 00:53:55.920
Tim Trabon: I remember I came back from like the first probably a year I was doing that. Like, I came back from a shoot one time and I was just like, No, people are that beautiful

690
00:53:58.560 –> 00:53:58.950
Tim Trabon: You know,

691
00:53:59.340 –> 00:54:02.160
Raymond Bonilla: So you’re like that little girl in the Norman Rockwell painting like

692
00:54:02.190 –> 00:54:05.460
Tim Trabon: Yeah, I was like, no, it exists. It’s just they won the lottery. No.

693
00:54:05.640 –> 00:54:13.680
Bill Koeb: Yeah, no, I, I’ve seen some people that that are not really beautiful but photograph incredibly well.

694
00:54:13.860 –> 00:54:20.100
Tim Trabon: Yeah, well, I think I was gonna say bill is that oftentimes, especially the cooler. The clothing. Yeah.

695
00:54:21.360 –> 00:54:30.390
Tim Trabon: That less, you know, they weren’t people that you would be like they just weren’t traditionally or like I whatever you call it like

696
00:54:30.420 –> 00:54:32.340
Bill Koeb: I shouldn’t say less beautiful just not

697
00:54:32.370 –> 00:54:34.710
Tim Trabon: Crowd no like I’m

698
00:54:35.040 –> 00:54:35.910
Tim Trabon: Really one of the

699
00:54:35.970 –> 00:54:39.570
Tim Trabon: Term for it. What’s it, what would be the term for it, somebody in the audience knows

700
00:54:40.410 –> 00:54:41.340
Raymond Bonilla: Maybe energetic

701
00:54:42.090 –> 00:54:44.430
Tim Trabon: No conventionally beautiful. Thank you. She

702
00:54:45.630 –> 00:54:48.960
Tim Trabon: Does I was trying to think of, um, yeah, it

703
00:54:50.070 –> 00:54:54.300
Tim Trabon: Yeah, we’re like minefield discussion.

704
00:54:55.320 –> 00:55:02.730
Tim Trabon: But uh yeah I know it really comes comes down to more intuitive, like a more interesting person. Yeah, you know,

705
00:55:03.210 –> 00:55:03.510
Tim Trabon: Like

706
00:55:03.600 –> 00:55:05.730
Tim Trabon: more memorable well

707
00:55:05.880 –> 00:55:16.830
John English: In drawing and painting design is a huge part of it. And God designed people certain way. Some people get in one won the won the lottery on that.

708
00:55:17.460 –> 00:55:21.420
Tim Trabon: Well, some sometimes it was exaggerated features were

709
00:55:21.960 –> 00:55:23.370
John English: Like absolutely a

710
00:55:23.520 –> 00:55:27.270
Tim Trabon: Much more like I saw that on sat a lot more often.

711
00:55:27.840 –> 00:55:29.670
John English: Oh yeah, I totally agree with you on that.

712
00:55:29.730 –> 00:55:31.170
Tim Trabon: I don’t know why. I mean, I don’t know.

713
00:55:32.490 –> 00:55:32.820
John English: Just

714
00:55:33.870 –> 00:55:36.570
Raymond Bonilla: Just photograph better because there is easier to get

715
00:55:36.840 –> 00:55:37.200
Out of

716
00:55:38.280 –> 00:55:38.610
Raymond Bonilla: Out of it.

717
00:55:39.270 –> 00:55:46.950
John English: Think about actors in Hollywood. I mean, like they have one of the key things is everybody’s had their heads are all oversized

718
00:55:48.690 –> 00:55:50.550
John English: Really, really, yeah.

719
00:55:51.840 –> 00:55:52.290
Tim Trabon: Sure.

720
00:55:55.260 –> 00:55:57.120
Tim Trabon: You heard it here first 100%

721
00:55:58.140 –> 00:55:58.740
Bill Koeb: True.

722
00:56:00.330 –> 00:56:01.650
Bill Koeb: There’s a little guy. Yeah.

723
00:56:02.130 –> 00:56:05.700
Bill Koeb: I remember being on the set for the City of Angels.

724
00:56:06.870 –> 00:56:13.650
Bill Koeb: And like other than the the people behind the camera. I was like the tallest person there, you know, and

725
00:56:14.910 –> 00:56:15.570
Raymond Bonilla: Well,

726
00:56:15.840 –> 00:56:17.190
Bill Koeb: I mean, we’re talking like

727
00:56:17.310 –> 00:56:18.870
John English: You’re, you’re pretty tall guy so

728
00:56:18.900 –> 00:56:20.400
Bill Koeb: Yeah but but

729
00:56:20.460 –> 00:56:21.600
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I’ll tell you, Bill.

730
00:56:21.720 –> 00:56:23.970
Bill Koeb: Well, I’m six one but I’m

731
00:56:24.240 –> 00:56:25.050
John English: Taller than that.

732
00:56:26.220 –> 00:56:26.940
Bill Koeb: What’s that

733
00:56:27.090 –> 00:56:34.650
John English: You seem taller than that. Oh, thanks. And you look in, by the way, whenever you’re doing, you look good. So the photo of you recently your real thin

734
00:56:35.280 –> 00:56:40.530
Bill Koeb: Oh, thanks. Yeah, I’m running. Thank you. I appreciate that I’m running and I’m

735
00:56:42.360 –> 00:56:45.390
Bill Koeb: doing push ups and sit ups, not so many sit ups.

736
00:56:45.420 –> 00:56:47.460
Raymond Bonilla: And apparently throwing heaving actors.

737
00:56:48.360 –> 00:56:48.930
Bill Koeb: What’s that

738
00:56:49.590 –> 00:56:52.740
Raymond Bonilla: You throw your throwing actors as well, since they’re so small.

739
00:56:53.040 –> 00:56:53.430
Yeah.

740
00:56:54.630 –> 00:56:55.020
Bill Koeb: Well,

741
00:56:55.470 –> 00:57:01.320
Bill Koeb: I’m thinking about it to like like you know now nowadays actors are all like incredible shape right

742
00:57:02.760 –> 00:57:03.840
Bill Koeb: When you’re little

743
00:57:04.320 –> 00:57:05.400
John English: It’s a Russell Crowe.

744
00:57:05.460 –> 00:57:07.650
Bill Koeb: You’re smaller, it’s a lot easier to get in shape.

745
00:57:08.340 –> 00:57:08.580
That

746
00:57:09.900 –> 00:57:12.300
Tim Trabon: You heard it here first scientific facts.

747
00:57:12.690 –> 00:57:14.100
Bill Koeb: No, I’m just saying, is because

748
00:57:14.340 –> 00:57:15.480
Raymond Bonilla: health tips with

749
00:57:15.480 –> 00:57:15.840
Guys.

750
00:57:16.950 –> 00:57:17.220
Bill Koeb: Like

751
00:57:18.450 –> 00:57:23.460
Tim Trabon: Bill as a five, seven foot person. I don’t believe that it is 20%

752
00:57:24.300 –> 00:57:27.540
Bill Koeb: I didn’t say I didn’t say shorter, I said.

753
00:57:28.140 –> 00:57:29.730
Tim Trabon: Little, little

754
00:57:30.180 –> 00:57:50.910
Bill Koeb: I knew a guy in school who was the skinniest smallest guy. I knew, and he could do more. Pull Ups and more upper body strength exercises better than any of the they’re really muscle cars. And I just think it’s, I don’t know, maybe I’m wrong, who knows.

755
00:57:51.540 –> 00:57:54.330
Tim Trabon: I was gonna yeah this is where we do the asterisk. No.

756
00:57:54.450 –> 00:57:56.100
John English: There’s no chance you’re wrong, Bill.

757
00:57:57.690 –> 00:57:58.110
Tim Trabon: Say,

758
00:57:59.250 –> 00:57:59.940
Bill Koeb: Maybe I’m wrong.

759
00:58:00.000 –> 00:58:03.780
Tim Trabon: I don’t know, just say this is the asterisk disclaimer of the

760
00:58:03.780 –> 00:58:04.350
Podcast.

761
00:58:06.720 –> 00:58:09.330
Tim Trabon: This is not a human biology podcast.

762
00:58:09.660 –> 00:58:11.970
Bill Koeb: I’m just making this up. Right. Yeah.

763
00:58:12.030 –> 00:58:14.340
Tim Trabon: We’re just trying to fill the air.

764
00:58:15.240 –> 00:58:21.540
Raymond Bonilla: Full disclosure to me. We usually wait till you leave for for us to talk about stuff like this to

765
00:58:21.540 –> 00:58:21.870
Raymond Bonilla: Just

766
00:58:22.260 –> 00:58:25.770
Tim Trabon: To just make wild yeah jack shows about science.

767
00:58:29.250 –> 00:58:30.990
Raymond Bonilla: I mean, that’s, to me, he agrees with us.

768
00:58:31.260 –> 00:58:31.710
Yeah.

769
00:58:32.790 –> 00:58:33.060
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

770
00:58:33.390 –> 00:58:34.350
Bill Koeb: I’ll stop mine.

771
00:58:34.680 –> 00:58:39.990
John English: Are our only expertise is hopefully we draw pretty well. And that’s about it.

772
00:58:42.450 –> 00:58:43.050
John English: From there,

773
00:58:43.230 –> 00:58:43.620
Yeah.

774
00:58:44.700 –> 00:58:45.690
John English: The grain of salt.

775
00:58:46.590 –> 00:58:52.740
Tim Trabon: Yeah, if you’re rolling your eyes about anything we’ve said just, just know that we really only came here to draw

776
00:58:54.810 –> 00:58:56.010
Raymond Bonilla: And heckle me so

777
00:58:56.070 –> 00:58:56.790
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that’s why.

778
00:58:57.750 –> 00:59:01.530
Raymond Bonilla: I love the fact that the focus is off me for a second.

779
00:59:02.220 –> 00:59:03.720
Raymond Bonilla: We’re fumbled through this thing.

780
00:59:04.770 –> 00:59:05.760
just bullshitting

781
00:59:08.100 –> 00:59:10.860
John English: It’s just, it’s just our simple theories

782
00:59:12.900 –> 00:59:13.410
Tim Trabon: Somebody

783
00:59:14.730 –> 00:59:17.430
Tim Trabon: tagged me just said love us for our art not our brains.

784
00:59:20.940 –> 00:59:22.590
Bill Koeb: Aren’t where you do the disclaimer that

785
00:59:23.550 –> 00:59:24.180
Tim Trabon: Thank you.

786
00:59:24.300 –> 00:59:25.980
Tim Trabon: Thank you for loving us for our

787
00:59:26.040 –> 00:59:27.000
Tim Trabon: Not our brains.

788
00:59:28.350 –> 00:59:33.360
Raymond Bonilla: One trick ponies, you know. Yeah. Yeah. Thanks.

789
00:59:33.960 –> 00:59:38.220
John English: Yeah, but the hope but the whole thing where it started about drawing interesting looking people

790
00:59:38.340 –> 00:59:38.820
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

791
00:59:39.060 –> 00:59:39.720
Raymond Bonilla: What day

792
00:59:39.810 –> 00:59:40.230
Tim Trabon: It is

793
00:59:40.620 –> 00:59:43.650
John English: A conversation route not conventionally beautiful people.

794
00:59:44.910 –> 00:59:47.700
John English: People with interest and it’s

795
00:59:48.870 –> 00:59:52.080
John English: There’s a big there’s a there’s a reason why. And, you know,

796
00:59:53.430 –> 00:59:54.120
John English: Interest.

797
00:59:55.590 –> 00:59:56.460
John English: Is built in.

798
00:59:59.160 –> 01:00:02.130
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I mean look at Mad Max, you know, this

799
01:00:03.870 –> 01:00:08.430
Raymond Bonilla: Madame good choose it was her name. I forgot. I forgot the last last name like

800
01:00:08.730 –> 01:00:10.410
John English: I would know. I know what you’re talking about.

801
01:00:10.440 –> 01:00:10.800
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

802
01:00:10.860 –> 01:00:11.250
You were

803
01:00:13.020 –> 01:00:24.690
Tim Trabon: Just the other week we’re all talking about it like I like first crushes are people that when we were younger we we found really beautiful and across the board. Everybody was like it wasn’t

804
01:00:26.490 –> 01:00:31.440
Tim Trabon: It wasn’t what you would expect to be conventional. It was all like striking characters.

805
01:00:33.360 –> 01:00:38.730
Tim Trabon: That you’d be like, whoa, that’s kind of out of left field and mine was the nanny.

806
01:00:41.010 –> 01:00:41.280
Tim Trabon: But

807
01:00:42.840 –> 01:00:44.190
Tim Trabon: Yeah, France, Russia, right.

808
01:00:44.730 –> 01:00:46.410
Tim Trabon: It’s like not a

809
01:00:50.910 –> 01:01:00.810
Tim Trabon: Yeah so anyways. But anyway, the funniest the funniest one that I really loved was I John’s friend was like, Simba.

810
01:01:04.980 –> 01:01:05.370
Tim Trabon: You’re like,

811
01:01:05.790 –> 01:01:06.780
Tim Trabon: You mean the cartoon.

812
01:01:07.800 –> 01:01:10.080
Tim Trabon: It’s like, yeah, Simba first crush.

813
01:01:13.110 –> 01:01:13.410
Tim Trabon: Like

814
01:01:16.320 –> 01:01:16.800
Tim Trabon: All right.

815
01:01:18.240 –> 01:01:19.590
Tim Trabon: Jonathan Taylor Thomas

816
01:01:23.070 –> 01:01:24.060
Tim Trabon: J. T. T.

817
01:01:24.150 –> 01:01:26.280
Raymond Bonilla: T T T T T T

818
01:01:28.170 –> 01:01:29.970
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my god, I’m so old.

819
01:01:31.590 –> 01:01:32.580
Tim Trabon: Did you say you’re still

820
01:01:34.020 –> 01:01:35.160
Bill Koeb: Trying to think about, like,

821
01:01:36.120 –> 01:01:36.930
Raymond Bonilla: We’re so

822
01:01:39.600 –> 01:01:43.590
John English: You have no idea. I’m so Jonathan Taylor Thomas’s

823
01:01:43.770 –> 01:01:45.060
Tim Trabon: Yeah, I know you got lap.

824
01:01:45.090 –> 01:01:46.290
Raymond Bonilla: You got laughed on that one.

825
01:01:46.320 –> 01:01:51.240
Tim Trabon: Yeah, Ray. Ray if Chris Payne are here. He’d be like, You mean that up and coming actor

826
01:01:55.530 –> 01:01:59.070
Raymond Bonilla: Quickly watches this I didn’t laugh laughing at

827
01:02:00.120 –> 01:02:01.710
Tim Trabon: Hey man, there’s a recording of it.

828
01:02:03.390 –> 01:02:05.520
John English: Don’t want to get into a debate of Christian

829
01:02:08.310 –> 01:02:11.160
John English: movies have a certain vintage. Yeah.

830
01:02:12.450 –> 01:02:17.400
Raymond Bonilla: He’s got like it’s encyclopedic brain about that, that in the reds, you know,

831
01:02:18.180 –> 01:02:20.490
John English: Baseball batting averages of

832
01:02:20.580 –> 01:02:21.690
Raymond Bonilla: Routing ever played.

833
01:02:21.690 –> 01:02:24.660
Raymond Bonilla: Baseball. Yeah. Incredible.

834
01:02:25.980 –> 01:02:28.770
John English: I was reading the post if is right before he came in from

835
01:02:29.670 –> 01:02:30.810
Tim Trabon: Complaining saw that

836
01:02:33.510 –> 01:02:36.510
Tim Trabon: I saw was a dense post

837
01:02:38.790 –> 01:02:45.480
Raymond Bonilla: It pretty much broke down everything. It’s like ESPN not take on your it’s like sports center in text form.

838
01:02:48.720 –> 01:02:50.250
John English: This is a piece of work, man.

839
01:02:59.250 –> 01:03:06.960
Raymond Bonilla: But I have run across them like people that I just like, you know, I look at us like I have to paint this person, you know. Oh, yeah.

840
01:03:09.900 –> 01:03:10.260
John English: I hope

841
01:03:12.270 –> 01:03:12.660
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

842
01:03:14.760 –> 01:03:17.520
Raymond Bonilla: It’s hard. You know, it’s interesting when when I, when you think about like

843
01:03:19.980 –> 01:03:25.590
Raymond Bonilla: What a, you know, what makes it, what is it. What’s the criteria, you know, and it’s they’re all for like different

844
01:03:27.180 –> 01:03:32.250
Raymond Bonilla: Different reasons, but it’s all about it being just striking. You know, like you look at the person like wow that’s

845
01:03:33.960 –> 01:03:35.310
Raymond Bonilla: Something striking about you.

846
01:03:35.370 –> 01:03:42.750
Raymond Bonilla: You know that I can, I can actually tell you know shared inside about myself through you, you know,

847
01:03:44.880 –> 01:03:53.580
Tim Trabon: If that makes any sense. Yeah. Like, my friend, Christopher which might predate you joining us re Christopher the model our founding

848
01:03:53.700 –> 01:03:55.230
Raymond Bonilla: Members law. Yeah, yeah.

849
01:03:55.290 –> 01:03:56.370
Bill Koeb: Yeah yeah

850
01:03:56.640 –> 01:03:58.350
Tim Trabon: Really really striking

851
01:03:58.830 –> 01:04:09.000
Tim Trabon: Totally striking guy and I grew up with him and like my entire life. Whenever he visits, I’ll have clothing that I’m like about to get rid of. And it’d be like, can I have that

852
01:04:09.690 –> 01:04:16.110
Tim Trabon: And I’ll give it to him. And I’ll be like, he looks so good in it. He looks so much better than I ever did that will be like gives it back to me.

853
01:04:19.770 –> 01:04:24.180
Tim Trabon: Like, like, no, this isn’t going to Goodwill anymore. I’m keeping

854
01:04:30.240 –> 01:04:33.270
John English: That’s when jihad is going to be really helpful for you to me.

855
01:04:37.560 –> 01:04:39.480
Raymond Bonilla: And that’s how you ended up in the camp. Right.

856
01:04:42.480 –> 01:04:42.990
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

857
01:04:45.000 –> 01:04:46.830
John English: These you knocked down by a river, man.

858
01:04:47.010 –> 01:04:48.540
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that’s right.

859
01:04:48.990 –> 01:04:50.700
Tim Trabon: You don’t know where my camper is john

860
01:04:51.420 –> 01:04:52.140
Oh, yeah, yeah.

861
01:04:54.780 –> 01:04:55.170
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

862
01:04:55.260 –> 01:04:56.190
John English: Back here.

863
01:04:56.370 –> 01:04:56.820
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

864
01:04:57.390 –> 01:04:58.200
You’re a lot closer.

865
01:04:59.730 –> 01:05:03.360
John English: In guessing since you have internet. It’s probably close by.

866
01:05:04.050 –> 01:05:05.970
Tim Trabon: Yeah, I’m going to Starbucks parking lot.

867
01:05:08.250 –> 01:05:09.330
John English: Parking lot because they

868
01:05:09.390 –> 01:05:09.810
They always

869
01:05:11.700 –> 01:05:12.990
John English: Used to anyway.

870
01:05:14.370 –> 01:05:17.430
Tim Trabon: No, my, my camper is become light and I saw workspace.

871
01:05:17.970 –> 01:05:18.870
John English: Is a cool thing.

872
01:05:19.500 –> 01:05:20.220
Bill Koeb: That’s cool.

873
01:05:21.630 –> 01:05:23.670
John English: Was it at the scamp. Is that what it’s called. It

874
01:05:23.820 –> 01:05:32.790
Tim Trabon: It’s a scamp yeah Giuliana and I got it. Just in time for pandemic to park in my backyard. So

875
01:05:35.430 –> 01:05:36.960
Bill Koeb: Just in time for you to move into it.

876
01:05:38.130 –> 01:05:38.640
Tim Trabon: Yeah, I

877
01:05:38.850 –> 01:05:40.800
John English: Mean a wonderful bar your wedding.

878
01:05:41.580 –> 01:05:42.000
Yeah.

879
01:05:43.620 –> 01:05:44.280
Raymond Bonilla: Nice.

880
01:05:45.630 –> 01:05:47.310
Raymond Bonilla: I like it. I like that idea.

881
01:05:50.760 –> 01:05:51.240
Raymond Bonilla: All right.

882
01:05:52.140 –> 01:05:54.960
Tim Trabon: Yeah, as far as a camper investments go

883
01:06:19.980 –> 01:06:23.700
John English: My drawing my previous time so you don’t have to show it to me.

884
01:06:25.320 –> 01:06:25.830
Okay.

885
01:06:26.850 –> 01:06:27.690
John English: I still didn’t get to

886
01:06:28.080 –> 01:06:29.490
Raymond Bonilla: That cuts out a third of our

887
01:06:30.780 –> 01:06:33.240
Raymond Bonilla: Third with studios and we get to visit that, you know, yeah.

888
01:06:34.770 –> 01:06:35.610
Tim Trabon: Murder because

889
01:06:36.000 –> 01:06:37.080
John English: Again, this is

890
01:06:39.030 –> 01:06:40.050
John English: Doing all kinds of stuff.

891
01:06:41.280 –> 01:06:41.730
Raymond Bonilla: Good.

892
01:06:43.110 –> 01:06:49.590
Bill Koeb: Talking about faces as much as I’d liked her face. I like the drawing better without her face in it.

893
01:06:49.800 –> 01:06:56.100
Raymond Bonilla: I attempted it like six times and just couldn’t couldn’t make it happen.

894
01:06:56.430 –> 01:06:57.780
Bill Koeb: You’re better man than I am. I did it.

895
01:06:59.910 –> 01:07:02.190
Bill Koeb: And then the hair on the bottom of her neck.

896
01:07:02.490 –> 01:07:03.750
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that’s just

897
01:07:04.590 –> 01:07:05.670
Bill Koeb: her neck. So I just

898
01:07:06.000 –> 01:07:06.690
Bill Koeb: left it out.

899
01:07:06.960 –> 01:07:07.770
Raymond Bonilla: That was out

900
01:07:08.400 –> 01:07:14.190
Bill Koeb: You know, these are the kinds of things that I think people who are who are trying to learn how to draw

901
01:07:15.270 –> 01:07:18.390
Bill Koeb: I think it’s good for them to think about like this area right here.

902
01:07:19.680 –> 01:07:27.600
Bill Koeb: That’s, you know, that to me that like that’s the shape of her neck and her chin and to add that hair and a silhouette wouldn’t add me

903
01:07:28.770 –> 01:07:30.000
Bill Koeb: Useful information.

904
01:07:32.910 –> 01:07:33.300
Raymond Bonilla: You know,

905
01:07:34.620 –> 01:07:37.140
John English: So why don’t you guys want to draw again or you want to make me draw

906
01:07:37.200 –> 01:07:39.150
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I would love to. I love to draw again.

907
01:07:39.600 –> 01:07:41.220
John English: Right, right. Let’s

908
01:07:41.550 –> 01:07:43.830
Raymond Bonilla: Let’s rock and roll this here. Let’s see. What have we got

909
01:07:45.240 –> 01:07:49.320
Raymond Bonilla: I would love to do the Jean jackets.

910
01:07:55.290 –> 01:07:55.710
Raymond Bonilla: Jacket.

911
01:07:56.610 –> 01:07:57.690
John English: Black and white. I got it.

912
01:08:02.580 –> 01:08:03.630
Raymond Bonilla: What’s the printer.

913
01:08:07.110 –> 01:08:08.820
Tim Trabon: John. Do you want me to fax you the

914
01:08:09.060 –> 01:08:09.840
John English: Yeah, please do.

915
01:08:10.380 –> 01:08:12.060
John English: Just working really well right now.

916
01:08:13.770 –> 01:08:14.820
Raymond Bonilla: You know, I was a

917
01:08:14.880 –> 01:08:16.290
John English: Very Kelly by fax

918
01:08:17.580 –> 01:08:20.070
Raymond Bonilla: Talking about faxes, I remember one time I was

919
01:08:21.150 –> 01:08:25.290
Raymond Bonilla: Early on, like I had one you know my

920
01:08:26.790 –> 01:08:41.250
Raymond Bonilla: My like the biggest award at one at the time was like, like my gold medal. The Society of illustrators. I was like reading. I was just like, Oh, I can’t believe I did it. You know, I did this and I was sitting in a, like a around like a whole bunch of chairs with

921
01:08:42.930 –> 01:08:57.030
Raymond Bonilla: Like a circle of chairs with Greg matches Marc summers date David Johnson and Tyler Jacobson was there. My buddy Eric Johnson was there. And we were just I think Jim Bennett was there and

922
01:08:58.140 –> 01:09:02.310
Raymond Bonilla: We were just asking him questions. They were all you know are our heroes right and so

923
01:09:03.180 –> 01:09:18.060
Raymond Bonilla: We got to talking about fax machines and Marc summers will talk about how when he first, the fact that when fax machines came by. It was the first time that because he lives, he lives in Canada that he was able to expand the amount of like

924
01:09:19.740 –> 01:09:26.430
Raymond Bonilla: Client class that he could work with. I mean, so he was working with clients, you know, and doing deadlines that he otherwise couldn’t have

925
01:09:26.910 –> 01:09:34.800
Raymond Bonilla: And so, but the problem was fact cities is so expensive that you have to go down to a fax place in the closest one was like, like a

926
01:09:35.520 –> 01:09:51.960
Raymond Bonilla: Couple of mile, a couple of miles away from his house. So what he would do is hop on his bike and go and to the facts place and then send the sketches out. And so he would talk about how, like, it was great. And it was like, but he was living in the future, up until like

927
01:09:53.190 –> 01:10:04.860
Raymond Bonilla: You know, every time up until art director started sending like leaving them voice messages. So by the time he came up with changes. And so he would bike all the way over to the facts place and then

928
01:10:05.520 –> 01:10:14.280
Raymond Bonilla: When he would get home, he would all of a sudden he looked at his phone and he received the beeping you know with that will be flashing the the the mailbox will be flashing

929
01:10:14.910 –> 01:10:22.890
Raymond Bonilla: Saying that he had like a voice message and it was usually an art director asked you for changing. So then he wrapped the change. Change the sketch make the changes that bike back

930
01:10:23.220 –> 01:10:31.950
Raymond Bonilla: To the fax machine plays and do that time and time again. So it became like this, like this, the bane of its existence, you know,

931
01:10:33.240 –> 01:10:35.460
Raymond Bonilla: Just having to retell that story. You know, we

932
01:10:36.480 –> 01:10:45.960
Raymond Bonilla: Especially during like really hot days, you know, get really hot. It’s always they always they always need changes when the weather was awful. Or it’s like you know he almost died getting over there.

933
01:10:48.240 –> 01:10:49.740
Bill Koeb: Yeah, really good shape.

934
01:10:50.130 –> 01:10:52.140
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, probably. I really good shape. Yeah.

935
01:10:53.970 –> 01:11:04.020
Tim Trabon: I like vaguely remember before the mobile phone that like going somewhere with my dad and then having like go up to somebody and be like,

936
01:11:05.820 –> 01:11:06.930
Tim Trabon: What’s the phone number here.

937
01:11:08.190 –> 01:11:08.790
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

938
01:11:08.940 –> 01:11:10.470
Tim Trabon: Yeah. And then he had to like

939
01:11:11.880 –> 01:11:15.480
Tim Trabon: call somebody and be like, if I get a call. Call this number.

940
01:11:16.290 –> 01:11:17.760
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

941
01:11:17.880 –> 01:11:22.770
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and like when you tell somebody like I’m going to be here at this time, you would just

942
01:11:23.850 –> 01:11:25.080
Raymond Bonilla: Wait for them, you know,

943
01:11:25.380 –> 01:11:26.880
Tim Trabon: Oh yeah and then you’d have no idea.

944
01:11:28.200 –> 01:11:31.080
Tim Trabon: I was supposed to go to a soccer game once and I just, we just

945
01:11:32.160 –> 01:11:37.260
Tim Trabon: My mom just drove us around for like an hour and a half, and was like, Sorry, I can’t find the place and we just went home.

946
01:11:42.420 –> 01:11:42.930
Tim Trabon: It was like

947
01:11:43.470 –> 01:11:44.640
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah, yeah.

948
01:11:45.000 –> 01:11:45.390
Yeah.

949
01:11:47.100 –> 01:11:49.110
Raymond Bonilla: Or the directions of how to get home.

950
01:11:49.170 –> 01:11:51.030
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my god.

951
01:11:52.350 –> 01:11:52.680
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

952
01:11:52.710 –> 01:11:53.250
It’s the

953
01:11:54.930 –> 01:11:55.890
Raymond Bonilla: Good stuff.

954
01:11:57.660 –> 01:12:05.610
Raymond Bonilla: Alright. So for this one I’m gonna try that. Exaggeration thing bill got me thinking that I need to stop becoming a

955
01:12:07.320 –> 01:12:08.640
Raymond Bonilla: copier and

956
01:12:12.300 –> 01:12:13.380
Raymond Bonilla: actually design a little

957
01:12:13.440 –> 01:12:15.960
John English: I was really helping you go there. Yeah.

958
01:12:18.420 –> 01:12:19.350
John English: Say anything

959
01:12:23.040 –> 01:12:23.640
John English: Right you to

960
01:12:27.240 –> 01:12:28.140
Raymond Bonilla: Make it too easy.

961
01:12:28.230 –> 01:12:31.740
Bill Koeb: Do you need it to be to exaggerate more

962
01:12:32.400 –> 01:12:35.250
Tim Trabon: Bill, you don’t remember saying, unlike rain it

963
01:12:40.140 –> 01:12:43.920
John English: I actually, I actually tried to make art and be creative in my work.

964
01:12:47.190 –> 01:12:48.330
John English: Right at the beginning, Bill.

965
01:12:48.900 –> 01:12:52.740
Tim Trabon: I don’t know why we started talking about facts. Yeah.

966
01:12:56.730 –> 01:12:59.310
Raymond Bonilla: Timmy felt bad about vaccines. Yeah.

967
01:13:00.210 –> 01:13:02.190
Tim Trabon: On the topic of just copiers

968
01:13:05.070 –> 01:13:06.270
Raymond Bonilla: Trying to change this up to the

969
01:13:06.270 –> 01:13:08.250
Raymond Bonilla: Baby feel better, but you only made me feel worse.

970
01:13:08.460 –> 01:13:08.970
Tim Trabon: You know,

971
01:13:09.150 –> 01:13:11.610
John English: We like to refer to it in the industry as a wrist.

972
01:13:12.060 –> 01:13:12.450
Right.

973
01:13:14.160 –> 01:13:15.450
Raymond Bonilla: Or ray or right

974
01:13:16.950 –> 01:13:18.060
John English: Or just an honor.

975
01:13:18.600 –> 01:13:19.620
Tim Trabon: Yeah, just a

976
01:13:23.460 –> 01:13:23.760
Raymond Bonilla: New

977
01:13:23.820 –> 01:13:25.620
Tim Trabon: New people joining tonight, like

978
01:13:25.920 –> 01:13:28.110
Bill Koeb: I apologize. This was

979
01:13:28.740 –> 01:13:29.190
Made

980
01:13:30.990 –> 01:13:32.430
Tim Trabon: Those guys are really mean.

981
01:13:35.370 –> 01:13:37.830
John English: They’re. They’re saying, Ray seems like a really nice guy.

982
01:13:38.820 –> 01:13:44.490
Tim Trabon: And they have really strong opinions on on the fitness and size of people

983
01:13:47.130 –> 01:13:47.550
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

984
01:13:49.980 –> 01:13:51.330
John English: These enormous heads. I can’t

985
01:13:51.360 –> 01:13:51.900
John English: Yeah.

986
01:13:52.770 –> 01:13:54.030
John English: I’m an observer. A lot. It’s

987
01:13:54.030 –> 01:13:55.740
Raymond Bonilla: Not me. It’s the actors.

988
01:13:56.010 –> 01:13:58.290
Tim Trabon: truly bizarre convictions. This guy’s

989
01:14:00.150 –> 01:14:03.630
Raymond Bonilla: Talking about big X ray or you want to draw something else.

990
01:14:08.370 –> 01:14:10.680
Bill Koeb: I think I’m going to recuse myself next week and

991
01:14:11.250 –> 01:14:11.340
I

992
01:14:13.410 –> 01:14:15.270
John English: Mean you mean cleanse for a week.

993
01:14:17.250 –> 01:14:18.090
John English: Good cleansing.

994
01:14:18.720 –> 01:14:26.070
Tim Trabon: But we need we need like Ashley or Audrey or Vanessa like really any women who draw with us today guys shut up.

995
01:14:26.400 –> 01:14:33.120
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah we’re usually pretty quiet because they’re usually like, you know, kicking our ass, as you know,

996
01:14:33.180 –> 01:14:34.020
Tim Trabon: Just like that.

997
01:14:34.350 –> 01:14:40.350
Raymond Bonilla: And actually drawing incredible pieces out. I’m like, Okay. She probably concentrated when I’m doing

998
01:14:43.980 –> 01:14:44.220
Yeah.

999
01:14:45.960 –> 01:14:48.570
Raymond Bonilla: Well you guys keep me on my toes, for sure.

1000
01:14:54.600 –> 01:14:55.920
Raymond Bonilla: I was gonna say something. Oh.

1001
01:14:58.950 –> 01:15:01.050
Raymond Bonilla: Before I got the real talking about myself.

1002
01:15:01.590 –> 01:15:02.160
I

1003
01:15:03.540 –> 01:15:06.510
Raymond Bonilla: Was we were talking about the design of shapes. Right.

1004
01:15:09.480 –> 01:15:10.620
Raymond Bonilla: I was what I was looking at

1005
01:15:11.760 –> 01:15:18.240
Raymond Bonilla: The create, you know, the creative illustration section in creative illustration where when it talks about like that.

1006
01:15:19.470 –> 01:15:24.750
Raymond Bonilla: The big shape approach and things like that are like the soft approach or like the blocky tree.

1007
01:15:24.750 –> 01:15:25.320
Molly.

1008
01:15:26.820 –> 01:15:29.100
John English: You want to call it shape welding, there was that

1009
01:15:33.270 –> 01:15:36.090
John English: If I heard you. Go ahead. I don’t mean to interrupt you, but

1010
01:15:36.210 –> 01:15:37.080
Raymond Bonilla: No, no. Yeah, yeah.

1011
01:15:37.710 –> 01:15:41.310
John English: Returned to shape designers shape welding, I might have

1012
01:15:42.060 –> 01:15:42.630
John English: Might have been

1013
01:15:43.890 –> 01:15:44.730
John English: Pile

1014
01:15:46.470 –> 01:15:51.930
Raymond Bonilla: Might have been yeah might have been. Actually, I think that might have came up in his description of

1015
01:15:53.310 –> 01:15:55.020
Raymond Bonilla: Maybe how piles.

1016
01:15:56.160 –> 01:15:59.220
Raymond Bonilla: Tech technique or how he broke down is like three value.

1017
01:16:00.060 –> 01:16:01.470
John English: Yeah, when he was doing all of his

1018
01:16:01.680 –> 01:16:04.680
John English: He was doing the value studies of piles work right.

1019
01:16:04.800 –> 01:16:20.370
Raymond Bonilla: Right. I think that’s probably where it came up and but yeah well actually talking about that, like what he was able to get done accomplished, like, you know, in those just simple value studies even like the ones. So you did the copies of the piles work and

1020
01:16:22.020 –> 01:16:32.640
Raymond Bonilla: Then he would do his own and and then you could just see how beautiful they were just like in this how they just read like the painting it would have read, you know,

1021
01:16:33.900 –> 01:16:45.840
Raymond Bonilla: Even though it was just the simple simple values and then even like in the techniques of like the approaches of things and how he went about, you know, painting an image based off of, like, how could you

1022
01:16:47.040 –> 01:16:49.620
Raymond Bonilla: Have different ways of handling an image, you know,

1023
01:16:50.970 –> 01:16:57.750
Raymond Bonilla: And leveraging that based off of, like, deciding which way based off of the type of painting that you might be dealing with, you know,

1024
01:16:58.410 –> 01:17:10.620
Raymond Bonilla: And all of it was always like these beautifully designed big shapes or like the camera sees too much. The I selects. I love that that that quote from him, you know, where he took takes the

1025
01:17:11.220 –> 01:17:24.090
Raymond Bonilla: The photograph of a woman was really complicated dress. What it’s addressed with like all these folds and he completely simplifies the folds and just paints the in the major masses and makes

1026
01:17:25.200 –> 01:17:30.750
Raymond Bonilla: Makes the the painting look more realistic than the photograph does you know

1027
01:17:31.890 –> 01:17:36.450
Raymond Bonilla: Or more believable, you know, and I just love that idea. And it’s something that I

1028
01:17:37.470 –> 01:17:39.900
Raymond Bonilla: Have to constantly remind myself that you know it’s

1029
01:17:42.450 –> 01:17:56.100
Raymond Bonilla: To do, because it’s you know it’s easy to just even though like I spent a ton of time editing my reference, you know, it could just be a starting point. It doesn’t necessarily have to be an end point either, you know,

1030
01:17:58.650 –> 01:17:59.040
Raymond Bonilla: But

1031
01:18:01.350 –> 01:18:01.770
Bill Koeb: You know,

1032
01:18:02.130 –> 01:18:06.570
John English: Best. It’s my favorite exercise, anybody that wants to

1033
01:18:07.770 –> 01:18:19.650
John English: An exercise to get better at composition practice exactly what Loomis was doing with by copying those piles. It is practice the three value thumbnail of really well verified.

1034
01:18:20.790 –> 01:18:25.950
John English: Artwork things that are really well designed, you know, pick, pick, pick artists that you’re going to trust you know

1035
01:18:27.390 –> 01:18:29.310
John English: Pick Gary Kelly pick right

1036
01:18:33.870 –> 01:18:47.460
John English: God number. I mean, any Well any Illustrator or painter that has a good design sense and then don’t don’t spend the time on the master copy, which is it has its place.

1037
01:18:47.850 –> 01:18:48.270
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1038
01:18:48.540 –> 01:18:58.320
John English: But really break down the pictures and what makes them work just in three value and just remember what you’ll start to feel what you’re, you know, what good thumbnail thing is for one you’ll learn that

1039
01:18:58.710 –> 01:19:04.800
John English: But you’ll start to understand what really makes those pictures work at a really high level, the basic construction of them.

1040
01:19:06.840 –> 01:19:10.140
Tim Trabon: Trying to think of what Thomas blackshear do

1041
01:19:11.880 –> 01:19:15.060
John English: Tom would be great dane corner would be awesome.

1042
01:19:15.630 –> 01:19:16.770
Bill Koeb: Offer would be good.

1043
01:19:17.130 –> 01:19:18.840
John English: Proper use would shake

1044
01:19:19.500 –> 01:19:25.860
Raymond Bonilla: Me che for tech, you could break down a copy Whitmore, we talked about cubby Whitmore al Parker.

1045
01:19:26.340 –> 01:19:29.130
John English: Yeah, my dad would be okay to do that for

1046
01:19:29.190 –> 01:19:31.380
Raymond Bonilla: Easy be okay up know

1047
01:19:31.980 –> 01:19:33.060
John English: You pass

1048
01:19:36.000 –> 01:19:36.660
Raymond Bonilla: I was thinking of

1049
01:19:38.100 –> 01:19:45.060
Raymond Bonilla: See, my god, why am I blanking on his name. I’m having that might be does at the end of the day for me for teaching

1050
01:19:46.920 –> 01:19:54.000
Raymond Bonilla: The artists to eat studied actually with pile. He ended up. He was an incredible designer and painter.

1051
01:19:55.260 –> 01:20:00.330
Raymond Bonilla: But he ended up retiring from the field by taking all of this work that he could find the burning it

1052
01:20:01.620 –> 01:20:02.280
Raymond Bonilla: Out there.

1053
01:20:05.550 –> 01:20:05.820
Like

1054
01:20:08.070 –> 01:20:09.870
Raymond Bonilla: Ha, for now.

1055
01:20:11.940 –> 01:20:15.060
Raymond Bonilla: He did the pizza parent you ever seen that one. It’s like a

1056
01:20:19.770 –> 01:20:23.280
Raymond Bonilla: My gut says it’s the one with the parent and the guys like

1057
01:20:25.380 –> 01:20:28.950
Raymond Bonilla: The guy like this buccaneer looking guy with like a teeth punched out

1058
01:20:30.960 –> 01:20:31.920
Raymond Bonilla: We used to joke.

1059
01:20:32.190 –> 01:20:33.060
John English: That student over

1060
01:20:33.960 –> 01:20:35.100
Raymond Bonilla: Know, and that’s going over

1061
01:20:36.240 –> 01:20:42.090
Raymond Bonilla: He was one of those students that he’s like oh he studied with our pal. He’s never usually, you know, and now people are like,

1062
01:20:42.510 –> 01:20:44.250
John English: Listen associated with them.

1063
01:20:45.210 –> 01:20:50.160
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. Not necessarily because it’s, I don’t know how long his career was, you know, he wasn’t really great on

1064
01:20:52.200 –> 01:20:55.530
Raymond Bonilla: Apparently he would fight with Art Directors all the time with deadlines and things like that.

1065
01:20:56.580 –> 01:20:59.040
Raymond Bonilla: But he had just this incredible approach.

1066
01:21:00.240 –> 01:21:01.080
Raymond Bonilla: And now it’s

1067
01:21:02.790 –> 01:21:07.290
Raymond Bonilla: Franklin, something I forgot. I’ll get the name. I’ll remember it.

1068
01:21:09.030 –> 01:21:09.360
But

1069
01:21:11.340 –> 01:21:16.380
Raymond Bonilla: But of course it’s very helpful. Since we’re mentioning names that are mentioned somebody that I can’t name.

1070
01:21:18.090 –> 01:21:19.200
John English: Used to it, man.

1071
01:21:19.530 –> 01:21:19.920
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1072
01:21:20.340 –> 01:21:23.940
Raymond Bonilla: It’s good. I went to that, uh, I went to that the the

1073
01:21:24.030 –> 01:21:28.530
Raymond Bonilla: Students of HARVEY. Harvey done in the students show at Norman Rockwell Museum

1074
01:21:28.800 –> 01:21:32.040
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and I saw Sarah still Weber’s

1075
01:21:33.570 –> 01:21:39.870
Raymond Bonilla: It was like a woman with leopards. You ever seen that one was she’s in a red dress. It’s part of the Kelly collection.

1076
01:21:40.320 –> 01:21:46.500
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and that thing. I walked around. So I did that first. And this is something I’d recommend to

1077
01:21:47.850 –> 01:22:02.580
Raymond Bonilla: People who are listening try walking around with, like, get it, get into a room with like these, you know, well, super well design paintings and walk around with your phone on but turn everything. Turn your phone viewer into black and white.

1078
01:22:03.090 –> 01:22:18.750
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah monochromatic and walk around and you could walk around all of these images. And you can see, it doesn’t matter how many colors when they’re the values were just exquisitely designed and they were just incredibly simple to strengthen the design on it.

1079
01:22:19.350 –> 01:22:22.680
John English: And making it too easy do the three value thumbnail.

1080
01:22:24.840 –> 01:22:25.320
John English: Practice.

1081
01:22:25.380 –> 01:22:26.040
Right.

1082
01:22:27.180 –> 01:22:34.350
John English: That through value thumbnails and amazing tool and it will help you understand what makes those pictures so great.

1083
01:22:34.770 –> 01:22:36.990
John English: Yeah, it will help your design.

1084
01:22:37.530 –> 01:22:38.340
John English: Oh, absolutely.

1085
01:22:39.030 –> 01:22:47.010
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, you gotta do it. I mean, you could. It’s fun to read about it, but it’s really useless unless you actually practice it because

1086
01:22:49.560 –> 01:22:52.800
Bill Koeb: I mean most of the stuff I do doesn’t have more than three values.

1087
01:22:54.150 –> 01:22:56.700
Bill Koeb: Maybe four to start out with.

1088
01:22:57.810 –> 01:22:59.220
John English: That’s, that’s a good thing.

1089
01:22:59.610 –> 01:23:00.030
Bill Koeb: Yeah, I

1090
01:23:00.090 –> 01:23:07.530
Bill Koeb: Mean it’s like, and I’m when I was doing landscapes. I mean, some of the color is off, but the value is what really

1091
01:23:08.730 –> 01:23:09.570
Bill Koeb: Makes the

1092
01:23:10.710 –> 01:23:11.640
Bill Koeb: Things read

1093
01:23:12.300 –> 01:23:22.980
John English: I’m going to quote right here, something he said I cut that he said one day that I thought was really smart. So Ray said most of the time when people ask me,

1094
01:23:23.640 –> 01:23:30.900
John English: What’s wrong with the color a student asked me what’s wrong with the color in the piece 99% of the time it’s it’s the value, not the call. Yeah.

1095
01:23:33.210 –> 01:23:33.570
John English: Sure.

1096
01:23:33.600 –> 01:23:35.250
Bill Koeb: Yeah, absolutely. Okay.

1097
01:23:35.310 –> 01:23:37.410
Raymond Bonilla: So that, that’s pretty strong. That’s pretty smart.

1098
01:23:38.010 –> 01:23:38.820
Bill Koeb: It is, yes.

1099
01:23:40.500 –> 01:23:41.160
Bill Koeb: For you.

1100
01:23:41.730 –> 01:23:42.690
Raymond Bonilla: For me yeah for me.

1101
01:23:43.260 –> 01:23:45.150
Bill Koeb: I’m sorry that George’s in here. So I just

1102
01:23:46.350 –> 01:23:47.730
John English: I like that, yeah.

1103
01:23:48.090 –> 01:23:51.420
Raymond Bonilla: Well you got so much work to do. I mean, like, I feel bad for you.

1104
01:23:53.010 –> 01:23:54.300
Raymond Bonilla: There’s no George no deal

1105
01:23:55.590 –> 01:24:03.180
Bill Koeb: So I’ve got a list here of Howard piles. They got Howard Pyle rock will lean Decker parish power Chandler Christie.

1106
01:24:03.630 –> 01:24:04.020
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah.

1107
01:24:04.380 –> 01:24:07.920
Bill Koeb: Shoot over why a Violet. Violet Oakley Jesse will come

1108
01:24:08.130 –> 01:24:09.210
John English: Read, girls, girls.

1109
01:24:09.600 –> 01:24:10.380
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

1110
01:24:10.650 –> 01:24:13.410
Bill Koeb: Jesse Wilcox Smith Elizabeth shipping green

1111
01:24:15.630 –> 01:24:17.520
Bill Koeb: Or any of those, the people you’re talking about

1112
01:24:17.850 –> 01:24:22.620
Raymond Bonilla: Now, Allah. Oh my god, I have to. That’s just going to bother me.

1113
01:24:25.260 –> 01:24:29.250
Raymond Bonilla: It’s a he’s in Illustrator in America. If anybody has that book.

1114
01:24:31.650 –> 01:24:33.960
John English: Okay, let me stop drawing and go grab it.

1115
01:24:33.990 –> 01:24:35.490
Raymond Bonilla: JUST SAW MY, YES.

1116
01:24:36.870 –> 01:24:39.930
Raymond Bonilla: So I love coming up because it just as much history or design.

1117
01:24:51.360 –> 01:24:53.640
John English: need about a day more finished this piece.

1118
01:24:59.970 –> 01:25:08.040
Raymond Bonilla: It’s a huge compliment to the to the art to the owner, right, just like wanting to do it justice. Oh.

1119
01:25:08.490 –> 01:25:10.770
John English: Yeah, something. Okay, well here’s

1120
01:25:11.820 –> 01:25:12.180
You know,

1121
01:25:13.230 –> 01:25:15.870
John English: Drawing like this is a perfect face, we’re

1122
01:25:17.010 –> 01:25:17.430
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1123
01:25:17.670 –> 01:25:21.420
John English: Yeah, it’s it’s it’s harder, harder for me.

1124
01:25:23.430 –> 01:25:26.400
John English: There’s nothing, you know, really, that you just

1125
01:25:27.540 –> 01:25:29.550
John English: Nothing really to grab on and so forth.

1126
01:25:30.630 –> 01:25:30.960
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and

1127
01:25:35.070 –> 01:25:38.640
Bill Koeb: That’s why I dropped mine out and just dealt with the side like

1128
01:25:41.310 –> 01:25:41.850
John English: I just

1129
01:25:43.410 –> 01:25:45.030
John English: I just did the same thing, Bill.

1130
01:25:47.790 –> 01:25:51.000
Bill Koeb: Yeah, exactly. I’m just like, I can’t deal with this perfect race, so

1131
01:25:52.830 –> 01:25:55.620
John English: I have nothing left on my page I grabbed it out so much

1132
01:25:57.000 –> 01:26:11.730
Tim Trabon: You guys say, cuz I think it might be a little confusing. Some people maybe not confusing, but people might want more like a elaborating or maybe it’s just hyperbolic when you say like a perfect face talking about like the design. Right. The, the shape

1133
01:26:12.120 –> 01:26:13.500
John English: Yeah, there’s not. I mean,

1134
01:26:13.830 –> 01:26:23.040
Tim Trabon: It’s not like I like we were talking earlier about like conventional beauty. That’s not the comment. It’s, it’s, it’s more of just the

1135
01:26:24.420 –> 01:26:26.940
Tim Trabon: The aesthetic for drawing design.

1136
01:26:28.230 –> 01:26:32.100
John English: This is a pretty softly lit face to

1137
01:26:34.020 –> 01:26:34.620
John English: Shadow

1138
01:26:36.540 –> 01:26:39.510
John English: And there’s not a whole lot a whole lot to grab onto

1139
01:26:40.530 –> 01:26:42.390
Bill Koeb: Right, and I can’t go see the bridge of the nose.

1140
01:26:42.390 –> 01:26:47.370
Bill Koeb: Too much if she has one at all right and

1141
01:26:50.610 –> 01:26:50.970
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1142
01:26:51.390 –> 01:26:51.780
Bill Koeb: You have

1143
01:26:52.170 –> 01:26:57.870
Raymond Bonilla: Not, not a piece of reference that is that you would use to define structure in place.

1144
01:26:58.290 –> 01:27:11.850
Bill Koeb: So it’s so you’ve got like the light side and then because you’re looking at on the screen. It looks very flat. Mm hmm. You know, because the light side in the dark side are almost, you know, they’re really close in value. So it’s really flattened out

1145
01:27:15.180 –> 01:27:27.390
Raymond Bonilla: And so the like I viewed as like when when I hear like perfect face. It’s just the design. You don’t really have to push the design. It’s already kind of built into it like a it is a really nice flow to the face.

1146
01:27:27.930 –> 01:27:39.420
Raymond Bonilla: Everything is an industry and I could do this because I can just put another layer on it, but like, everything has this beautiful contra positive pose. That is, you know, you can see it’s like an ash shape going through

1147
01:27:40.440 –> 01:27:41.970
Raymond Bonilla: This whole thing like this.

1148
01:27:42.990 –> 01:27:48.930
Raymond Bonilla: And it’s, it’s that this is what makes the photograph so so good so

1149
01:27:50.250 –> 01:27:57.930
Raymond Bonilla: Trying to maintain that gestures in there, but everything kind of echoes that even the face, you know, the way that goes into the neck and the shoulder and

1150
01:27:58.290 –> 01:28:04.980
Raymond Bonilla: And that comes out to the outside of the pelvis and goes back in these counter rhythms. I mean it’s, that’s what makes it beautiful and

1151
01:28:05.580 –> 01:28:16.650
Raymond Bonilla: You know you’re when we talked about, like, just not worrying about that not messing it up, you know, there’s nothing for me to add in terms of that I’m just trying to capture that as close as possible, and if not attempt to

1152
01:28:17.820 –> 01:28:19.560
Raymond Bonilla: You know, push that those aspects.

1153
01:28:21.960 –> 01:28:24.570
Raymond Bonilla: Of that that no

1154
01:28:24.630 –> 01:28:25.680
Bill Koeb: Man makes perfect sense of

1155
01:28:26.670 –> 01:28:27.540
Bill Koeb: Fashion drawing

1156
01:28:28.560 –> 01:28:28.950
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1157
01:28:29.310 –> 01:28:29.820
Bill Koeb: Right, you know,

1158
01:28:31.530 –> 01:28:34.620
Bill Koeb: It’s. It is simple terms of possible. I mean, just getting

1159
01:28:35.670 –> 01:28:38.760
Bill Koeb: That the shape in in her body.

1160
01:28:40.710 –> 01:28:42.480
Bill Koeb: In the way she’s posed in the way you know

1161
01:28:45.690 –> 01:28:50.010
Bill Koeb: That would, that would be how the poses and like clothes figure class where the Academy of Art.

1162
01:28:50.040 –> 01:28:51.360
Raymond Bonilla: They’d be like, yeah, totally. I was just

1163
01:28:51.600 –> 01:28:53.430
Raymond Bonilla: Like barbara barbara would tell us that

1164
01:28:53.490 –> 01:28:54.090
Bill Koeb: You know, yeah.

1165
01:28:54.420 –> 01:28:58.800
Tim Trabon: Hey Ray I think people might have missed it. Can you show that as shape again one more time. Sorry.

1166
01:28:58.860 –> 01:29:00.150
Raymond Bonilla: Oh sure, yeah. Yeah.

1167
01:29:01.230 –> 01:29:05.250
Raymond Bonilla: I’m gonna drop better thinking somebody saw when I was really clumsy.

1168
01:29:07.290 –> 01:29:14.160
Raymond Bonilla: So you can see the and I’ll do it on the reference, just so you can see the reference probably that easier.

1169
01:29:16.920 –> 01:29:20.730
Raymond Bonilla: So there’s a there’s an ash shape that goes. Oops.

1170
01:29:28.650 –> 01:29:29.550
Raymond Bonilla: Goes like this.

1171
01:29:32.250 –> 01:29:50.460
Raymond Bonilla: And you could see everything kind of follows that design and it’s it’s a very beautiful shape. Because it, it carries the I, all the way through. Right. And you’ll see that, like everything kind of echoes that even down to the hair you and then you could also see the counter.

1172
01:29:52.320 –> 01:29:58.620
Raymond Bonilla: Sort of rhythms going through, through it on the other side as well. So it keeps the I constantly flowing

1173
01:29:59.010 –> 01:30:03.300
Raymond Bonilla: And like, if you look at the design of the picture. And this is what we were talking about how like photographers

1174
01:30:03.690 –> 01:30:22.050
Raymond Bonilla: You know, they have to. They’re trying to capture everything all in the piece, right, I mean, everything goes towards you know the face. I mean, it’s built upon like really strong, strong shapes like why is this I lit, more so than than this guy right here. Well, it’s because of that, you know,

1175
01:30:22.410 –> 01:30:26.850
Bill Koeb: And then that strong light on the side of her which is it’s the highest value, you know,

1176
01:30:27.360 –> 01:30:31.470
Bill Koeb: Exactly. It’s even higher than the white top that she’s worried

1177
01:30:31.560 –> 01:30:32.520
Raymond Bonilla: You know exactly

1178
01:30:32.760 –> 01:30:34.650
Bill Koeb: That pulls you all the way up to her face.

1179
01:30:34.890 –> 01:30:43.710
Raymond Bonilla: Right, and it’s just like why these lines in the background. Like, it’s not a coincidence that they’re going right through her, her eyes, you know, or

1180
01:30:43.950 –> 01:30:45.240
Raymond Bonilla: Vertical lines, keep keep you

1181
01:30:45.240 –> 01:30:51.450
Raymond Bonilla: Down in here and this one strong line comes down and here and then everything kind of curls back and you’ll see that

1182
01:30:52.380 –> 01:31:01.590
Raymond Bonilla: Constantly and really great well designed images, you know, and that’s why this stuff is is medium agnostic, right, I mean, you know, beautiful images, a beautiful image.

1183
01:31:02.160 –> 01:31:15.090
Raymond Bonilla: well designed images and web design image and and I call it. I went when something is beautiful. For me, it’s something I’m constantly going back to and Mike experiencing over and over again, as if it’s the first time I’ve I’m experiencing it.

1184
01:31:15.390 –> 01:31:22.170
Bill Koeb: Yeah, you see, you know, those are leading lines and you see that a lot in cardiac arrest ons photos.

1185
01:31:22.620 –> 01:31:24.210
Raymond Bonilla: You know, totally. Yeah, he

1186
01:31:24.420 –> 01:31:27.060
Bill Koeb: He uses those lines to like move you around.

1187
01:31:28.140 –> 01:31:29.520
Bill Koeb: The image and

1188
01:31:32.400 –> 01:31:35.040
Bill Koeb: And you also, you know, you’re sitting films to like where

1189
01:31:35.220 –> 01:31:35.940
Bill Koeb: Somebody wants

1190
01:31:36.060 –> 01:31:46.050
Bill Koeb: toward you. And there’s this this wall behind them. You know that that leads you right to, you know, to the person that they’re walking or whatever to the object.

1191
01:31:47.670 –> 01:31:52.980
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and things like little things like why you know like the lamp shade would be, you know, if you have a character that’s talking

1192
01:31:53.550 –> 01:31:59.160
Raymond Bonilla: You’ll see things like the lamp. Little things like lamp, the lamp shade or phone angle towards you know

1193
01:31:59.490 –> 01:32:12.720
Raymond Bonilla: That person or someone shoulder runs a leading line right through you know or what, why, you know, you see that, I mean comic book art, art is a classic example. I mean, like, there’s a reason why people point a lot in

1194
01:32:14.280 –> 01:32:16.350
Raymond Bonilla: It, which is right. It’s like, it’s like

1195
01:32:17.130 –> 01:32:18.510
Raymond Bonilla: Look over here, you know,

1196
01:32:19.560 –> 01:32:22.140
Tim Trabon: Kind of on that this is a bit of a side note, but

1197
01:32:24.240 –> 01:32:33.570
Tim Trabon: What you were saying about those lines was really interesting me because I recently all I’ll see if I can dig it up and send it to the Facebook group tomorrow.

1198
01:32:34.050 –> 01:32:51.960
Tim Trabon: I saw a list of like historical photos that were journalistic photos so they’re not commercial by any means of like historical events where there was like a very subtle basically a problem with the photo, whether it be online or

1199
01:32:53.430 –> 01:32:56.100
Tim Trabon: The composition there compositional issues.

1200
01:32:56.580 –> 01:32:58.290
Tim Trabon: That essentially like were like

1201
01:32:58.650 –> 01:33:05.220
Tim Trabon: Basically approved by the journalistic community for Been Retouched before going to print

1202
01:33:06.870 –> 01:33:15.990
Tim Trabon: And it’s like a very technical process because I’m like, in fact, many journalists have gotten in like very, very serious trouble for retouching their photos.

1203
01:33:16.620 –> 01:33:21.960
Tim Trabon: Oh yeah, but these were instances where essentially like they went through an approval process to basically be like

1204
01:33:22.980 –> 01:33:29.460
Tim Trabon: I believe one is actually the Kent State shooting photo has been retouched

1205
01:33:29.550 –> 01:33:30.300
Raymond Bonilla: To. Oh, wow.

1206
01:33:30.660 –> 01:33:36.390
Tim Trabon: Wow, they removed. There was a pole in the back of the photo.

1207
01:33:37.650 –> 01:33:38.400
Tim Trabon: That was just

1208
01:33:39.540 –> 01:33:40.830
It it like

1209
01:33:41.970 –> 01:33:44.460
Tim Trabon: Kind of basically just messed up the photo.

1210
01:33:45.150 –> 01:33:45.750
Raymond Bonilla: Wow.

1211
01:33:45.930 –> 01:33:48.360
Tim Trabon: Or that that does how they felt at least I don’t know.

1212
01:33:48.540 –> 01:33:49.560
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah yeah

1213
01:33:49.560 –> 01:33:50.790
Tim Trabon: Yeah, what

1214
01:33:51.090 –> 01:33:53.520
Raymond Bonilla: It muddied up what they were trying to communicate.

1215
01:33:53.610 –> 01:33:55.800
Raymond Bonilla: Exactly. Yeah. Yeah.

1216
01:33:56.340 –> 01:34:03.270
Tim Trabon: I’ll see if I can find it because there’s there’s only a few photos and when you look this up most of what you’re going to find is, like, and

1217
01:34:04.470 –> 01:34:07.260
Tim Trabon: journalists who have completely destroyed their career supply

1218
01:34:07.650 –> 01:34:07.920
Tim Trabon: The

1219
01:34:08.220 –> 01:34:10.500
Tim Trabon: Grading completely fake photos. They’re like,

1220
01:34:10.500 –> 01:34:11.220
Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

1221
01:34:11.340 –> 01:34:15.510
Tim Trabon: Like basically spreading horrible like non true like

1222
01:34:15.750 –> 01:34:16.170
Totally

1223
01:34:17.250 –> 01:34:18.030
Tim Trabon: But yeah

1224
01:34:18.270 –> 01:34:18.990
Raymond Bonilla: That’s probably what you

1225
01:34:19.980 –> 01:34:24.120
Bill Koeb: Like to do you know Robert Frank’s photos, Timmy.

1226
01:34:26.220 –> 01:34:27.960
Tim Trabon: I’m about to learn a bit more

1227
01:34:28.320 –> 01:34:42.510
Bill Koeb: Go to the link and the go to the link in the that I just posted. But there’s one of like a railway station and it’s getting his shoes shined in a bathroom and you just see how he used the tops the urinals. It’s like leaving

1228
01:34:42.570 –> 01:34:50.700
Bill Koeb: I see. Yeah. Right. You know, and then I mean in all of his photos to, you know, you can see it. Yeah.

1229
01:34:53.610 –> 01:34:56.490
Raymond Bonilla: You know, you know what really got me on that.

1230
01:34:58.830 –> 01:35:07.740
Raymond Bonilla: Like is one of the first things I remember thinking of like helping me think about that, besides like running into the Brandywine artists work on

1231
01:35:09.030 –> 01:35:17.220
Raymond Bonilla: Behind the scenes segment of the on the DVD of Treasure Planet Disney animated movie was

1232
01:35:18.900 –> 01:35:20.820
Raymond Bonilla: Up somebody and took a

1233
01:35:22.440 –> 01:35:28.440
Raymond Bonilla: Summer class at SBA from an artist by the name itself. I’m an adult, I don’t know, Bill, you know Sam and

1234
01:35:28.920 –> 01:35:29.220
I know

1235
01:35:31.020 –> 01:35:31.200
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

1236
01:35:31.260 –> 01:35:34.200
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, so he had no idea was until I

1237
01:35:35.250 –> 01:35:45.000
Raymond Bonilla: You know, I took a class with him and he was like incredible. And he gave us a huge packet and one in the packet was bollywood’s I forgot how many panels that always work.

1238
01:35:45.690 –> 01:35:56.040
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and it’s this great collection of like these panels always work like it’s like so and so it’s like like to me.

1239
01:35:56.640 –> 01:35:57.480
Bill Koeb: It always work.

1240
01:35:57.780 –> 01:35:59.820
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, and it’s like a lesson in

1241
01:36:00.870 –> 01:36:05.130
Raymond Bonilla: Shape design, you know, and it’s like that john when you were saying, you know, you always quote

1242
01:36:07.440 –> 01:36:12.210
Raymond Bonilla: You know Brett’s work or brands saying like, it’s a puzzle for a dumb guy, you know,

1243
01:36:14.580 –> 01:36:23.730
Raymond Bonilla: And it’s they always work like if there’s so there’s such powerful images, which is why they’re at that communicate instantly. And I think that’s the

1244
01:36:24.990 –> 01:36:28.140
Raymond Bonilla: Kind of good leads back to this what we were talking about with this.

1245
01:36:30.120 –> 01:36:38.250
Raymond Bonilla: With this photograph and anything that you know I’m deleting stuff that doesn’t support that like the support that shape. If it goes slightly against it.

1246
01:36:38.730 –> 01:36:48.960
Raymond Bonilla: Or if I feel that it’s you know when I’m trying to to paint it. If it doesn’t work with with it with my idea because I only have certain amount of time to

1247
01:36:50.520 –> 01:36:53.820
Raymond Bonilla: I’m going to delete it. I’m going to get it out out right

1248
01:36:57.810 –> 01:37:02.580
Raymond Bonilla: Which is funny that it’s always synonymous with things like time limits and things like that and like

1249
01:37:04.170 –> 01:37:17.850
Raymond Bonilla: A comic book artwork and you know and fashion dramatic stuff that has to be done fast, but the principles, you know, are were born in like the great paintings of, you know, our age. I mean, like,

1250
01:37:19.200 –> 01:37:25.980
Raymond Bonilla: Like what, like the Brandywine artists stuff or even down to Jerome or, you know, Buddha road called Ella Roche, like, you know, these

1251
01:37:27.360 –> 01:37:29.700
Raymond Bonilla: Which weren’t done very quickly, you know,

1252
01:37:31.680 –> 01:37:37.200
Raymond Bonilla: Women compared to something like comic book garbage. So the stuff has to just look super strong. I mean, we were talking about

1253
01:37:38.670 –> 01:37:47.730
Raymond Bonilla: Thomas’s work right. I mean, you could look at that King Kong poster and it’s it’s filled with just it’s built so simply, it’s, it’s almost like

1254
01:37:49.050 –> 01:37:50.880
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my goodness, you know it’s it’s

1255
01:37:51.900 –> 01:38:02.340
Raymond Bonilla: incredibly intricate image, but everything is built like place in there to the to such an exquisite fashion. That’s what makes it like a great, beautiful image.

1256
01:38:07.980 –> 01:38:11.820
Raymond Bonilla: But I can, I can talk talk about Thomas’s work ad nauseum and

1257
01:38:12.120 –> 01:38:12.990
Bill Koeb: Absolutely.

1258
01:38:13.020 –> 01:38:15.810
Bill Koeb: I mean, that’s great. That’s a great example to hear what

1259
01:38:16.050 –> 01:38:18.720
John English: You’re referring to. You didn’t say his last name, Thomas black shirt.

1260
01:38:18.930 –> 01:38:20.070
Raymond Bonilla: Thomas black shoes I

1261
01:38:20.640 –> 01:38:22.320
Tim Trabon: Just shared a I just shared a link

1262
01:38:23.460 –> 01:38:40.110
Tim Trabon: I should also chime in and say that I, I looked, I looked to try to look up the article I was telling you guys about and I immediately found like Time magazine’s like defense of their use of the photo and they blamed the photographer. And so basically everything I said was, like, not true.

1263
01:38:43.530 –> 01:38:44.850
Tim Trabon: It was just like near bogus.

1264
01:38:45.930 –> 01:38:57.000
Tim Trabon: Bogus complaint know that photographer retouched. It was not accepted by the journalism, the world of journalism was enraged by and

1265
01:38:58.170 –> 01:38:59.880
Raymond Bonilla: Photographers side on it and

1266
01:38:59.910 –> 01:39:03.270
Tim Trabon: Yeah, so apparently. Yeah, apparently the photographer got

1267
01:39:04.350 –> 01:39:07.530
Tim Trabon: Heavily criticized for that decision and

1268
01:39:08.070 –> 01:39:13.710
Tim Trabon: Not a governing body of journalists deciding what historical photos to free topics.

1269
01:39:15.000 –> 01:39:15.330
Tim Trabon: So,

1270
01:39:15.840 –> 01:39:17.580
Raymond Bonilla: What do you think around too long.

1271
01:39:17.790 –> 01:39:18.870
Bill Koeb: Do you remember the time

1272
01:39:19.590 –> 01:39:20.160
Tim Trabon: Around. Yeah.

1273
01:39:20.760 –> 01:39:25.080
Bill Koeb: Kimmy. Do you remember the time Newsweek thing with the photo of OJ Simpson.

1274
01:39:27.690 –> 01:39:31.440
Tim Trabon: We go, well, could you refresh my memory. I think

1275
01:39:32.430 –> 01:39:33.270
Bill Koeb: The photo.

1276
01:39:34.410 –> 01:39:35.940
Bill Koeb: There’s a photo of OJ Simpson.

1277
01:39:36.300 –> 01:39:41.640
Bill Koeb: Yeah, that was his mug shot that was used on the cover of Newsweek and then

1278
01:39:42.780 –> 01:39:48.930
Bill Koeb: I believe it was Matt mahorn was hired by time to take the same cover.

1279
01:39:50.160 –> 01:39:53.490
Bill Koeb: And alter it and it’s much, much darker and it’s much

1280
01:39:54.240 –> 01:39:54.900
Tim Trabon: It’s awful.

1281
01:39:55.620 –> 01:39:58.680
Bill Koeb: Yeah, and it’s like, it was really controversial to

1282
01:40:00.240 –> 01:40:03.990
Bill Koeb: And I, if I’m not mistaken. He took a lot of flack for that I

1283
01:40:04.020 –> 01:40:06.720
Tim Trabon: Would Matt Yeah I would imagine so. Yeah.

1284
01:40:07.260 –> 01:40:07.980
John English: Matt, did

1285
01:40:08.700 –> 01:40:10.080
Bill Koeb: I believe so. Yeah.

1286
01:40:12.690 –> 01:40:28.620
Bill Koeb: But it was like it was also like the difference between what is a photograph and what is a photo illustration and what reality is I’m going to post a link is from the Bronx. The Bronx documentary center and alternate images.

1287
01:40:29.790 –> 01:40:30.120
Yeah.

1288
01:40:31.440 –> 01:40:35.880
Bill Koeb: Yeah, I mean, it also I mean it raised a lot of really good questions. I felt

1289
01:40:37.080 –> 01:40:39.660
Bill Koeb: Because he was used if he had just done a painting.

1290
01:40:40.740 –> 01:40:42.480
Bill Koeb: It would have it would have been a different

1291
01:40:44.100 –> 01:40:45.030
Bill Koeb: Situation.

1292
01:40:52.050 –> 01:40:52.320
But

1293
01:40:54.060 –> 01:40:54.630
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that’s

1294
01:40:55.380 –> 01:41:00.360
Tim Trabon: It kind of goes into like go the land, the landscape, we’re in today with news where it’s like

1295
01:41:04.140 –> 01:41:07.830
Tim Trabon: Yeah, it’s, it’s, like, it really is a

1296
01:41:09.450 –> 01:41:11.160
Tim Trabon: resource for information, not a

1297
01:41:13.410 –> 01:41:16.860
Tim Trabon: You know when when it steps away from editorial

1298
01:41:17.340 –> 01:41:38.520
Bill Koeb: Right. I also remember thing. Years ago I read where it artists was talking about the difference in the way like an illustration with proceed and the way a photograph was perceived and that a lot of people like if you do a very dark image.

1299
01:41:40.530 –> 01:41:47.340
Bill Koeb: You know as an artist, you’re kind of people sort of wonder like, you know, how do you do you feel that way is that represent you.

1300
01:41:48.840 –> 01:41:57.570
Bill Koeb: And but if a photographer takes it like a horrific, you know, photo like a horrific image. Yeah, they’re not instantly associated with

1301
01:41:58.830 –> 01:42:01.140
Bill Koeb: The same kind of darkness, or the same kind of

1302
01:42:02.700 –> 01:42:04.470
Bill Koeb: You know assumption of mental illness.

1303
01:42:04.920 –> 01:42:05.340
Right.

1304
01:42:08.370 –> 01:42:10.440
Raymond Bonilla: Expectations are difference when you’re saying like that.

1305
01:42:10.470 –> 01:42:13.470
Bill Koeb: Right, right. And so like it’s seen in a whole different light.

1306
01:42:16.380 –> 01:42:18.330
Bill Koeb: I really like what John’s doing with that drawing

1307
01:42:21.600 –> 01:42:22.020
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1308
01:42:23.400 –> 01:42:24.780
Yeah, our time is awesome.

1309
01:42:26.370 –> 01:42:28.470
Raymond Bonilla: That’s great. We are we done

1310
01:42:29.790 –> 01:42:30.690
John English: I don’t know. I know.

1311
01:42:32.940 –> 01:42:33.780
Bill Koeb: It looks good.

1312
01:42:34.590 –> 01:42:36.960
Tim Trabon: But it’s, yeah. Bill, I

1313
01:42:38.700 –> 01:42:39.870
Tim Trabon: Will say, Bill, I’m a

1314
01:42:41.070 –> 01:42:45.120
Tim Trabon: War photographer probably like four or five years ago, named died.

1315
01:42:46.320 –> 01:42:48.960
Tim Trabon: It was embarrassing because I pronounce his last name wrong when a man

1316
01:42:49.350 –> 01:42:49.800
Tim Trabon: And he’s like,

1317
01:42:50.160 –> 01:42:51.090
Tim Trabon: James Knox way.

1318
01:42:51.330 –> 01:42:52.170
Bill Koeb: Oh, I know who he is.

1319
01:42:53.760 –> 01:42:54.720
Bill Koeb: And he’s amazing

1320
01:42:55.260 –> 01:42:55.980
John English: Oh my god.

1321
01:42:56.400 –> 01:42:58.110
John English: Yeah, he’s a photographer.

1322
01:42:58.650 –> 01:43:01.440
Tim Trabon: And he doesn’t remember me, I guarantee it.

1323
01:43:03.240 –> 01:43:06.120
Tim Trabon: Unless, maybe I embarrass myself enough that

1324
01:43:08.040 –> 01:43:19.740
Tim Trabon: Um, but I, I met him before a lecture that he gave Kate university I K you yeah okay yeah I’m on Lawrence and

1325
01:43:21.240 –> 01:43:23.460
Tim Trabon: That was a big part of his

1326
01:43:25.590 –> 01:43:35.160
Tim Trabon: His, His actually he and this is like years ago. So I’m trying to remember exactly, but there was some like trouble with that, like the

1327
01:43:36.480 –> 01:43:43.110
Tim Trabon: The judgment of capturing these images and not stepping in. When he did or

1328
01:43:43.830 –> 01:43:44.460
Bill Koeb: Right.

1329
01:43:44.580 –> 01:43:45.870
Tim Trabon: You know, and, and him.

1330
01:43:46.020 –> 01:43:47.970
Bill Koeb: Not stopping the thing from happening.

1331
01:43:48.030 –> 01:43:50.520
Tim Trabon: Yeah, and. And one of the things that

1332
01:43:51.690 –> 01:43:52.320
Tim Trabon: I think was

1333
01:43:53.880 –> 01:43:58.530
Tim Trabon: And I might be, but I’m definitely butchering it but he he essentially kind of

1334
01:43:59.700 –> 01:44:05.070
Tim Trabon: A lot of his photography was a in regards to hunger.

1335
01:44:05.400 –> 01:44:06.960
Tim Trabon: And oh yeah and

1336
01:44:08.700 –> 01:44:12.510
Tim Trabon: Those photos are like really difficult to look at. And a lot of the judgment was

1337
01:44:13.980 –> 01:44:17.820
Tim Trabon: You know, what did he do like being there and

1338
01:44:19.830 –> 01:44:35.850
Tim Trabon: And I think he he had like a kind of it seemed to trouble him. But then, a lot of it was his photography that the work that is photography was used to bring attention to that. And it’s similar in regards to like all forms of art and like how it can shed light.

1339
01:44:35.970 –> 01:44:36.750
Bill Koeb: On a move right

1340
01:44:36.840 –> 01:44:38.220
Tim Trabon: I can shed light on problem.

1341
01:44:40.440 –> 01:44:51.780
Tim Trabon: It was, but it was, it was like what you were just talking about that, like that dark like that. The trouble of some nature of like a a tragic or disturbing photo or artwork. It’s like

1342
01:44:53.370 –> 01:45:03.990
Tim Trabon: If anything, it was very clear hearing him speak that he was more trouble by the things he had taken photos and then anyone else. He was so troubled. And He couldn’t stay away from it.

1343
01:45:04.440 –> 01:45:05.880
Tim Trabon: Right, yeah.

1344
01:45:06.420 –> 01:45:10.590
Bill Koeb: He talked about he talked about 911 actually he he brought his camera down on the street.

1345
01:45:12.000 –> 01:45:18.060
Bill Koeb: Because he’s thinking studio was really close to the towers. He was on a news program talking about it.

1346
01:45:20.610 –> 01:45:24.750
Bill Koeb: And then I think time did a whole series published a whole series of his photos.

1347
01:45:26.610 –> 01:45:36.450
Bill Koeb: From that, but he talked about, you know, seeing the war was always sort of someplace else. Mm hmm. And then that brought it home, you know that it was happening here.

1348
01:45:37.860 –> 01:45:42.240
Bill Koeb: There’s a, there’s a great documentary to on Sebastian Delgado

1349
01:45:44.490 –> 01:45:47.100
Bill Koeb: Where he. Do you know the Brazilian photographer.

1350
01:45:48.540 –> 01:45:49.770
John English: Don’t know who that is.

1351
01:45:50.160 –> 01:45:52.920
Bill Koeb: He’s a, he’s an incredible photographer and he

1352
01:45:54.960 –> 01:45:59.250
Bill Koeb: He has a book out called an uncertain grace, he photographed.

1353
01:46:00.390 –> 01:46:01.290
Bill Koeb: The people who are

1354
01:46:03.780 –> 01:46:06.930
Bill Koeb: Basically I forget the country. I don’t want to say their own thing, but

1355
01:46:09.300 –> 01:46:22.710
Bill Koeb: They were digging in this goal in this like silver miner this gold mine and like they’re covered caked in mud good images of the migrations of people. He did images of the the famine in Somalia.

1356
01:46:23.880 –> 01:46:29.010
Bill Koeb: But he said to counter that he started doing nature photography and

1357
01:46:30.420 –> 01:46:31.470
John English: It just runs

1358
01:46:33.060 –> 01:46:35.370
John English: Really pitches are really simple things that

1359
01:46:35.400 –> 01:46:46.020
Bill Koeb: Yeah. Really simple things in, like, but he also started. He and his wife started planting. I think it was in Brazil started planting replanting a forest.

1360
01:46:50.790 –> 01:46:55.620
Bill Koeb: And so to sort of like trying to heal both himself and

1361
01:46:57.540 –> 01:47:02.400
Bill Koeb: The things that he had seen sort of done to the earth by mankind for humankind.

1362
01:47:03.120 –> 01:47:08.310
John English: I could certainly see i can’t i because I don’t know that photographer, but innocuous pieces.

1363
01:47:10.380 –> 01:47:13.380
John English: The psychological damage of what he saw.

1364
01:47:13.830 –> 01:47:14.700
Bill Koeb: Oh, yeah.

1365
01:47:14.940 –> 01:47:23.820
John English: First time I saw George Pratt had this huge book and presented it had just gotten it why we were at the Academy, I

1366
01:47:23.880 –> 01:47:27.540
Tim Trabon: John and before anybody Google’s and I’ll say it is

1367
01:47:28.110 –> 01:47:28.950
John English: It’s disturbing.

1368
01:47:29.070 –> 01:47:31.110
Tim Trabon: Trigger trigger warning, definitely.

1369
01:47:31.200 –> 01:47:32.100
Tim Trabon: Be yeah yeah

1370
01:47:32.640 –> 01:47:41.280
John English: But it’s, we’re just work. And just the fact that somebody witness in in the struggles. He had witnessing all that stuff is. I certainly did it.

1371
01:47:42.480 –> 01:47:48.000
Tim Trabon: cheered up he teared up during the lecture. And it was kind of one of those things really like oh wow like to bring yourself.

1372
01:47:49.230 –> 01:47:58.230
Tim Trabon: Back, they’re talking about it. You know, it was like, how could you because I think the easier way to see something like that, as you think like, well, he’s

1373
01:47:59.640 –> 01:48:09.000
Tim Trabon: Games must be made as something tougher than me because I couldn’t have gone through it. He did, and you’re just like, no, this is taken a toll clearly

1374
01:48:09.240 –> 01:48:09.660
Yeah.

1375
01:48:10.890 –> 01:48:13.170
John English: All right, that’s, that’s great. You got to see him.

1376
01:48:13.980 –> 01:48:21.720
Tim Trabon: You know, the only reason I got CMS because I was with Nick V dress. And so, so he was like, I’m gonna go introduce myself. Come on.

1377
01:48:23.430 –> 01:48:24.420
John English: The guy’s amazing

1378
01:48:24.780 –> 01:48:27.210
Tim Trabon: I would have stayed 100 feet away from him.

1379
01:48:27.330 –> 01:48:32.580
Tim Trabon: Was that he he’s a he’s a incredibly talented.

1380
01:48:32.970 –> 01:48:35.460
Tim Trabon: commercial photographer use

1381
01:48:36.630 –> 01:48:39.870
Tim Trabon: One of the, one of the most talented photographers

1382
01:48:41.100 –> 01:48:42.090
Tim Trabon: I’ve ever known.

1383
01:48:43.590 –> 01:48:47.670
Tim Trabon: And he he kind of taught me everything I knew about photography

1384
01:48:49.350 –> 01:48:54.240
Tim Trabon: Nick. Nick V dress. If you’re looking for some really powerful portrait work.

1385
01:48:55.980 –> 01:49:00.030
John English: What, what kind of cloud Timmy has because he photographed him. He’s sweating.

1386
01:49:00.780 –> 01:49:03.990
Bill Koeb: Oh, that’s cool. I will come. This is the book by

1387
01:49:05.460 –> 01:49:06.270
Bill Koeb: Salgado

1388
01:49:07.770 –> 01:49:08.190
Raymond Bonilla: I’m sorry.

1389
01:49:09.180 –> 01:49:11.730
John English: I didn’t mean to, to just stopped interrupt your Timmy because

1390
01:49:11.730 –> 01:49:12.870
Tim Trabon: No, no. JOHN

1391
01:49:13.140 –> 01:49:16.230
John English: Oliver deserves the credit man, he’s a he’s a hell of a photographer.

1392
01:49:16.320 –> 01:49:22.290
Tim Trabon: He’s a hell of a photographer, we’re excited that he came to photograph my wedding to deal with my wedding now was

1393
01:49:23.490 –> 01:49:26.490
Tim Trabon: That I called him and I was like Nick is a

1394
01:49:27.690 –> 01:49:30.660
Tim Trabon: Pandemic wedding. We’re gonna have like 12 people there.

1395
01:49:32.160 –> 01:49:34.170
Tim Trabon: You’re not family. You got to have a job.

1396
01:49:37.380 –> 01:49:37.770
Tim Trabon: Like

1397
01:49:38.220 –> 01:49:39.150
Tim Trabon: I’ll bring my camera.

1398
01:49:40.950 –> 01:49:51.960
John English: So what my job was at Timmy his wedding was right when they were about to start the service. The, the business school behind him the lawn mower guy shows up.

1399
01:49:53.340 –> 01:49:53.760
John English: They start

1400
01:49:54.540 –> 01:49:56.400
John English: They said, Todd. You got to make that stop.

1401
01:49:57.390 –> 01:49:57.750
Yeah.

1402
01:49:59.250 –> 01:50:01.110
John English: empty my wallet to the lawn mower guy.

1403
01:50:02.130 –> 01:50:02.460
Making

1404
01:50:03.990 –> 01:50:07.170
Tim Trabon: Basically Janice family. My family and then

1405
01:50:08.880 –> 01:50:10.560
Tim Trabon: The visual arts passage family.

1406
01:50:13.470 –> 01:50:13.770
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1407
01:50:17.820 –> 01:50:19.590
John English: It was a great night. You know,

1408
01:50:23.220 –> 01:50:24.390
John English: You’re living in a camper.

1409
01:50:24.960 –> 01:50:27.630
Bill Koeb: Living in a guy down by the river.

1410
01:50:27.990 –> 01:50:29.250
Tim Trabon: Yeah, the

1411
01:50:30.840 –> 01:50:32.250
Tim Trabon: Taco Bell parking lot.

1412
01:50:35.010 –> 01:50:35.820
John English: At all, man.

1413
01:50:36.420 –> 01:50:38.130
Bill Koeb: Yeah. You live in the dream.

1414
01:50:38.490 –> 01:50:38.880
John English: Yeah.

1415
01:50:39.450 –> 01:50:41.220
Tim Trabon: Okay, so I might have to drive out

1416
01:50:41.220 –> 01:50:42.270
John English: Yes pose.

1417
01:50:42.780 –> 01:50:43.500
John English: last boss.

1418
01:50:44.310 –> 01:50:47.040
John English: Was coming up in your drawing again.

1419
01:50:47.430 –> 01:50:48.780
Bill Koeb: Oh god. Okay.

1420
01:50:59.010 –> 01:51:02.970
Raymond Bonilla: I’m actually going on my other screen to try and find

1421
01:51:04.110 –> 01:51:05.430
Raymond Bonilla: That Howard Pyle student

1422
01:51:07.980 –> 01:51:11.670
Raymond Bonilla: So I’m actually have it saved on Facebook. I just never

1423
01:51:15.330 –> 01:51:17.580
Raymond Bonilla: Have no idea how to access my safe stuff on

1424
01:51:19.380 –> 01:51:21.930
Raymond Bonilla: On the desktop version. Oh my god. Let’s see.

1425
01:51:22.260 –> 01:51:26.070
Bill Koeb: Um, so I guess I’ll draw the cowboy hat. That’s the only one left.

1426
01:51:28.470 –> 01:51:29.490
John English: That’s what we were thinking

1427
01:51:29.670 –> 01:51:31.320
Tim Trabon: closing down the House bill.

1428
01:51:31.650 –> 01:51:34.140
Raymond Bonilla: closing down the House bill. Oh boy.

1429
01:51:41.880 –> 01:51:46.080
Tim Trabon: I’m just curious from the audience who’s, who’s drawing with us for the first time tonight.

1430
01:51:50.010 –> 01:51:51.000
Tim Trabon: Or the last time.

1431
01:51:58.140 –> 01:51:58.560
Yeah.

1432
01:52:00.660 –> 01:52:03.240
Tim Trabon: Awesome welcome welcome welcome welcome.

1433
01:52:04.500 –> 01:52:06.030
John English: Very much hope that you enjoyed it.

1434
01:52:07.830 –> 01:52:25.770
Tim Trabon: Yeah, or yeah and I will say that Fridays every Friday I wake up and if this is like pre pre pandemic. If I were to go to a friend’s house. The next day, I’d be like, I should text them and apologize for that stupid thing. I said, and now

1435
01:52:25.860 –> 01:52:27.600
Tim Trabon: Every Friday I wake up and I’m like,

1436
01:52:28.320 –> 01:52:29.700
Raymond Bonilla: Good goodness, I didn’t say that.

1437
01:52:30.090 –> 01:52:36.990
Tim Trabon: I need to know. I know every Friday morning. Now I wake up and I think I need to message like a few hundred people.

1438
01:52:39.480 –> 01:52:44.040
John English: I thought you were gonna say, Now I need to text them and apologize for that stupid thing right I said

1439
01:52:44.310 –> 01:52:47.280
Tim Trabon: Oh yeah no I

1440
01:52:47.550 –> 01:52:48.750
Tim Trabon: Do every Friday. I’m like,

1441
01:52:50.490 –> 01:52:51.990
Tim Trabon: I probably should write an apology.

1442
01:52:53.310 –> 01:52:55.080
Raymond Bonilla: Now we know why he was gone for a month.

1443
01:52:56.100 –> 01:52:56.550
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1444
01:52:58.110 –> 01:52:59.040
Funny. Yeah.

1445
01:53:00.330 –> 01:53:06.030
Tim Trabon: All that being said all that being said, you know, we’re all we’re always joking around. And, you know,

1446
01:53:07.200 –> 01:53:08.850
John English: We’re trying to entertain ourselves.

1447
01:53:08.940 –> 01:53:11.850
Tim Trabon: We’re trying to entertain ourselves. We’re doing our best and so

1448
01:53:12.420 –> 01:53:15.780
Raymond Bonilla: If we if we didn’t jump around or make fun of each other. We

1449
01:53:17.100 –> 01:53:21.360
Raymond Bonilla: Would then that’s there’s something wrong, then we probably, probably not. We probably don’t like you.

1450
01:53:21.720 –> 01:53:21.960
John English: Know,

1451
01:53:22.320 –> 01:53:27.990
Bill Koeb: Hey guys, do you do any of you guys wake up really tired on Friday morning after this

1452
01:53:29.610 –> 01:53:31.140
Tim Trabon: I wake up, tired every day.

1453
01:53:31.650 –> 01:53:32.550
Bill Koeb: Oh well.

1454
01:53:34.050 –> 01:53:36.840
Raymond Bonilla: Every day. Every day is illustration isolation for me, Bill.

1455
01:53:37.710 –> 01:53:39.570
Tim Trabon: What you wake up tired on Fridays.

1456
01:53:39.630 –> 01:53:41.820
Bill Koeb: Yeah, I’m not sure why just like

1457
01:53:41.850 –> 01:53:43.770
Tim Trabon: You think it’s our fault. Yeah.

1458
01:53:45.870 –> 01:53:48.300
Raymond Bonilla: And another thing that you do.

1459
01:53:48.330 –> 01:53:48.840
Yes.

1460
01:53:49.890 –> 01:53:50.760
Bill Koeb: No, no, it’s not.

1461
01:53:51.480 –> 01:53:52.140
John English: That one to

1462
01:53:52.800 –> 01:53:56.760
Tim Trabon: Fernando Fernando says it’s 2am where he is too. Yeah.

1463
01:53:59.400 –> 01:54:01.830
Bill Koeb: Sorry, Fernando Fernando

1464
01:54:02.730 –> 01:54:04.710
Raymond Bonilla: Fernando is this Fernando’s first

1465
01:54:07.050 –> 01:54:09.270
Raymond Bonilla: Episode first and last name first

1466
01:54:14.220 –> 01:54:17.850
John English: I almost like my drawing, but I can’t. I can’t get there.

1467
01:54:21.780 –> 01:54:24.780
Raymond Bonilla: Alright, so I, the way I figured out the artist. His name was

1468
01:54:24.780 –> 01:54:27.630
Raymond Bonilla: Walter every i don’t know how i box that

1469
01:54:29.430 –> 01:54:30.930
Raymond Bonilla: To hear Walter every

1470
01:54:31.440 –> 01:54:31.950
John English: Oh, yeah.

1471
01:54:33.300 –> 01:54:35.520
Raymond Bonilla: And this is the one I was talking about, actually.

1472
01:54:35.940 –> 01:54:41.100
John English: I just read I just read, he was he was first with pile at the Delaware.

1473
01:54:41.610 –> 01:54:43.860
Raymond Bonilla: Right that Delaware. Not right. Not at, um,

1474
01:54:43.950 –> 01:54:44.460
John English: Yeah, not

1475
01:54:44.700 –> 01:54:45.900
Raymond Bonilla: Not a bread and wine. Right.

1476
01:54:46.950 –> 01:54:47.250
John English: I’m just

1477
01:54:47.280 –> 01:54:51.870
Raymond Bonilla: This is his famous piece. It’s on my screen.

1478
01:54:53.760 –> 01:54:55.320
Raymond Bonilla: One of his favorite pieces.

1479
01:54:55.830 –> 01:54:56.670
Bill Koeb: Oh, that’s cool.

1480
01:54:58.710 –> 01:54:59.130
Bill Koeb: Wow.

1481
01:54:59.550 –> 01:55:00.750
Raymond Bonilla: This thing is insane.

1482
01:55:01.380 –> 01:55:02.820
Bill Koeb: It’s a light on there, man.

1483
01:55:03.840 –> 01:55:05.430
Raymond Bonilla: And the color Armenians.

1484
01:55:07.560 –> 01:55:14.400
Raymond Bonilla: And see if I can find another one of his. But yeah, Walter Everett, check this out, yo. He goes, he went from that to this.

1485
01:55:16.050 –> 01:55:16.320
Yeah.

1486
01:55:21.660 –> 01:55:22.650
I mean just

1487
01:55:23.700 –> 01:55:26.160
Raymond Bonilla: And then watch this one. Hold on. This is the last one, I promise.

1488
01:55:27.540 –> 01:55:29.190
Raymond Bonilla: You that shapes holy

1489
01:55:30.900 –> 01:55:33.600
Tim Trabon: Ray I missed your first, your first one. Sorry, man.

1490
01:55:33.960 –> 01:55:34.860
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, here.

1491
01:55:36.570 –> 01:55:37.350
Raymond Bonilla: Let’s see.

1492
01:55:37.770 –> 01:55:39.000
John English: Ready doesn’t go back

1493
01:55:39.900 –> 01:55:42.690
Raymond Bonilla: Radios yeah sorry to me. You’re gonna have to just see on the bottom.

1494
01:55:43.020 –> 01:55:44.490
Bill Koeb: Panel. In most one way

1495
01:55:47.070 –> 01:55:48.090
Raymond Bonilla: It’s this one right here.

1496
01:55:48.420 –> 01:55:50.340
Tim Trabon: Raise that i can i say

1497
01:55:51.120 –> 01:55:51.570
Raymond Bonilla: See that

1498
01:55:52.230 –> 01:55:54.960
Tim Trabon: On Facebook messages open. I was like, great. You should close that

1499
01:55:55.380 –> 01:55:57.240
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, yeah. Now, this is, this is like

1500
01:55:58.170 –> 01:56:00.150
Raymond Bonilla: It is my Facebook but it’s, you know,

1501
01:56:00.240 –> 01:56:00.750
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1502
01:56:01.020 –> 01:56:01.620
Tim Trabon: This comment.

1503
01:56:01.950 –> 01:56:02.730
Raymond Bonilla: It seems it’s all

1504
01:56:03.060 –> 01:56:05.280
Raymond Bonilla: It’s all good. Hey, you owe me money and then

1505
01:56:06.360 –> 01:56:07.680
Raymond Bonilla: Somebody was asking me about

1506
01:56:07.680 –> 01:56:08.100
The

1507
01:56:09.210 –> 01:56:10.590
Raymond Bonilla: Og, we’re talking about the the

1508
01:56:12.150 –> 01:56:15.060
Raymond Bonilla: The Dean Cornwell with the pirate

1509
01:56:18.150 –> 01:56:19.740
Raymond Bonilla: But this is like a great album that

1510
01:56:22.110 –> 01:56:22.920
Raymond Bonilla: Sidharth

1511
01:56:25.980 –> 01:56:30.210
Raymond Bonilla: Chatter that he, I think he studied that illustration. He went to illustration

1512
01:56:31.260 –> 01:56:34.740
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, he’s great man and he got an

1513
01:56:36.390 –> 01:56:40.740
Raymond Bonilla: A great taste of art or either that or he just likes a lot of the same people that I like.

1514
01:56:41.940 –> 01:56:42.720
Raymond Bonilla: Why I say it’s like

1515
01:56:43.290 –> 01:56:43.950
Raymond Bonilla: Which is, yeah.

1516
01:56:45.090 –> 01:56:54.630
Raymond Bonilla: But this is so it’s not that this is not the pirate thing that I was talking about. But in terms of the local value. But this is another Diem Cornwall that you’d be much less the same thing as you can see

1517
01:56:56.010 –> 01:57:06.450
Raymond Bonilla: Pitches pitches, the local value so that everything’s this beautiful three value thing and I love the design of the branch, how it goes right into the head and everything’s just

1518
01:57:07.590 –> 01:57:11.250
Bill Koeb: That piece that pieces in black and white with the orange.

1519
01:57:12.540 –> 01:57:12.960
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1520
01:57:13.050 –> 01:57:14.130
Raymond Bonilla: The original is. Yeah.

1521
01:57:14.340 –> 01:57:15.210
Bill Koeb: That’s crazy.

1522
01:57:16.470 –> 01:57:21.360
Raymond Bonilla: And it’s it’s it’s thick, it’s, it’s, you could see, it’s like Kate on you know

1523
01:57:22.140 –> 01:57:26.340
Bill Koeb: That that tea kettle or whatever in the corner. That’s amazing.

1524
01:57:26.580 –> 01:57:28.470
Bill Koeb: Right, a dark, that is, and

1525
01:57:29.010 –> 01:57:30.210
Bill Koeb: Little bit of light on it.

1526
01:57:32.010 –> 01:57:40.800
Raymond Bonilla: And he just like if you. It literally is like it’s the classic pile. Like you could put light against light or dark against dark Middleton against but I’ll tell you can do whatever you want.

1527
01:57:41.520 –> 01:57:46.470
Raymond Bonilla: Well, whatever you do, you have to make sure that your focal point is the highest point of contrast and that is like

1528
01:57:47.670 –> 01:57:52.140
Raymond Bonilla: Howard Pyle to the team in this Dean karma. It doesn’t it just doesn’t get

1529
01:57:54.180 –> 01:57:56.820
Bill Koeb: And obviously, what was the name of the other artists, you mentioned

1530
01:57:57.300 –> 01:57:58.140
Raymond Bonilla: Walter every

1531
01:57:58.560 –> 01:58:00.630
Bill Koeb: Welter ever it. Okay, yeah. Cool.

1532
01:58:01.560 –> 01:58:12.600
Raymond Bonilla: It’s the whole like lat against it. He’s a classic one to like it’s just let it slide deck again start middle tell me gets Middletown, but whenever the wherever the focal point is has to be the highest point of contrast

1533
01:58:15.540 –> 01:58:17.400
John English: Alright, so we’re gonna do one more post

1534
01:58:17.850 –> 01:58:18.510
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, let’s do

1535
01:58:20.190 –> 01:58:20.400
Tim Trabon: It.

1536
01:58:20.910 –> 01:58:24.600
Tim Trabon: In between in between poses. I’m going to show you guys one of my favorite

1537
01:58:26.490 –> 01:58:26.640
Tim Trabon: You

1538
01:58:26.940 –> 01:58:27.120
Tim Trabon: Like

1539
01:58:27.330 –> 01:58:28.170
John English: Me to everybody.

1540
01:58:28.350 –> 01:58:29.160
Tim Trabon: What’s that, how

1541
01:58:29.640 –> 01:58:30.960
John English: Did you bounce around everybody

1542
01:58:31.350 –> 01:58:35.880
Tim Trabon: I will. I’m gonna really quickly. I’m gonna share my favorite photo by Nick V dress.

1543
01:58:40.290 –> 01:58:40.920
Bill Koeb: That’s cool.

1544
01:58:44.910 –> 01:58:45.360
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1545
01:58:47.640 –> 01:58:48.330
Tim Trabon: So, yeah.

1546
01:58:48.900 –> 01:58:52.470
Raymond Bonilla: That was great. Oh man, I love it.

1547
01:58:53.940 –> 01:58:55.860
Tim Trabon: All right. JOHN very

1548
01:58:56.580 –> 01:59:01.260
Raymond Bonilla: Beautiful john No. All right. Well, motion. The band john

1549
01:59:02.670 –> 01:59:03.720
Bill Koeb: Oh that’s gorgeous.

1550
01:59:08.040 –> 01:59:09.750
Raymond Bonilla: Well, that’s what I was trying to do that’s

1551
01:59:12.900 –> 01:59:13.530
Raymond Bonilla: When I didn’t

1552
01:59:15.360 –> 01:59:16.350
Bill Koeb: Light on her hair.

1553
01:59:19.710 –> 01:59:24.420
John English: That’s really funny. I didn’t want to draw that pose at all, just because

1554
01:59:25.470 –> 01:59:28.410
John English: She was very intimidating, because she’s so perfect.

1555
01:59:28.860 –> 01:59:29.340
Yeah.

1556
01:59:31.260 –> 01:59:32.550
John English: Room. Yeah.

1557
01:59:33.780 –> 01:59:36.090
Raymond Bonilla: Because, you know, you have to like if you’re gonna pull it off.

1558
01:59:36.780 –> 01:59:37.080
John English: Because

1559
01:59:38.070 –> 01:59:41.010
John English: It was not draw very much of her just right.

1560
01:59:41.070 –> 01:59:42.150
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah

1561
01:59:42.600 –> 01:59:44.580
John English: Be very subtle. This

1562
01:59:45.570 –> 01:59:46.830
Raymond Bonilla: And you got to mail it on that.

1563
01:59:48.510 –> 01:59:49.800
Raymond Bonilla: Don’t do much, but

1564
01:59:50.430 –> 01:59:51.450
Raymond Bonilla: I really do make sure it’s

1565
01:59:51.690 –> 01:59:53.100
Raymond Bonilla: Right. Nailing it, yeah.

1566
02:00:06.420 –> 02:00:09.660
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I love this, like, man, that’s coming this way.

1567
02:00:10.680 –> 02:00:11.580
Raymond Bonilla: To really push that

1568
02:00:15.180 –> 02:00:20.070
Raymond Bonilla: These all these all of these photos have extremely strong silhouettes.

1569
02:00:23.640 –> 02:00:24.180
John English: To me.

1570
02:00:24.510 –> 02:00:24.930
Tim Trabon: Yes.

1571
02:00:25.170 –> 02:00:28.650
John English: Are you we’re going to feature bill, aren’t we

1572
02:00:29.790 –> 02:00:30.180
Tim Trabon: Sure.

1573
02:00:31.410 –> 02:00:33.090
John English: Didn’t Ramin you just drew we just

1574
02:00:33.210 –> 02:00:35.910
Raymond Bonilla: I wasn’t even looking at yeah yeah

1575
02:00:37.050 –> 02:00:37.980
Raymond Bonilla: I mean, we did last time.

1576
02:00:38.100 –> 02:00:39.030
I was asked, you know,

1577
02:00:42.540 –> 02:00:43.470
Bill Koeb: Neither greedy.

1578
02:00:50.250 –> 02:00:51.660
Raymond Bonilla: You know, maybe focus on

1579
02:00:58.110 –> 02:00:59.910
John English: Okay, Raymond, what are we gonna have to do

1580
02:01:01.170 –> 02:01:02.340
John English: We’ve mentioned

1581
02:01:04.830 –> 02:01:05.160
John English: The

1582
02:01:06.450 –> 02:01:08.430
John English: Your, your Friday drawing session.

1583
02:01:10.230 –> 02:01:12.600
Raymond Bonilla: We moved, we moved it to Saturday at

1584
02:01:14.130 –> 02:01:16.740
Raymond Bonilla: 330 Eastern Standard Time 630

1585
02:01:17.850 –> 02:01:23.610
Raymond Bonilla: Pacific no 330 Pacific Standard Time 630 Eastern Standard Time.

1586
02:01:24.090 –> 02:01:26.340
John English: So what are we gonna have to do to get Tyler in here too.

1587
02:01:27.900 –> 02:01:30.000
Raymond Bonilla: Oh man, you know, he’s like,

1588
02:01:30.480 –> 02:01:31.380
John English: He’s a busy, dude.

1589
02:01:31.740 –> 02:01:34.110
Raymond Bonilla: He’s a busy man. Yeah, and he

1590
02:01:35.550 –> 02:01:36.600
Raymond Bonilla: I have no idea.

1591
02:01:36.810 –> 02:01:37.320
John English: He’s got a

1592
02:01:38.370 –> 02:01:40.020
John English: Flask is doing a book on him, isn’t it.

1593
02:01:40.620 –> 02:01:43.200
Raymond Bonilla: Yep, yep, yep.

1594
02:01:44.250 –> 02:01:44.940
Raymond Bonilla: So he’s

1595
02:01:45.390 –> 02:01:47.790
John English: Like you, you know, you’re hanging around with

1596
02:01:49.200 –> 02:01:51.330
John English: You know, people haven’t books written about them and

1597
02:01:51.450 –> 02:01:54.000
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah I know, right. Hey, guys.

1598
02:01:54.840 –> 02:02:01.950
Raymond Bonilla: The cocktail parties are great. Right. I’m just trying to get into the the cocktail parties with the nicer d’oeuvres

1599
02:02:03.090 –> 02:02:08.760
Raymond Bonilla: And so I’ve got perfected the of the perfect Ziploc bag that I carry around

1600
02:02:14.100 –> 02:02:15.510
Raymond Bonilla: What we were supposed to go to the

1601
02:02:16.530 –> 02:02:18.060
Raymond Bonilla: Because he was going to be in the

1602
02:02:19.770 –> 02:02:26.340
Raymond Bonilla: Norman at the Norman Rockwell Museum for the masses of fantasy art or something like that show

1603
02:02:27.780 –> 02:02:30.360
John English: Which is not being live right it’s not

1604
02:02:31.710 –> 02:02:34.740
Raymond Bonilla: No. Yeah, I think it’s next it got it got pushed back to next year.

1605
02:02:37.890 –> 02:02:38.100
John English: As

1606
02:02:38.370 –> 02:02:51.060
Raymond Bonilla: Well as everything else. Yeah, but you know in it was actually it’s crazy. Actually, we are they had actually made it the same day the opening as the society of illustrators Hall of Fame.

1607
02:02:51.480 –> 02:02:53.310
Raymond Bonilla: The 25th. Yeah.

1608
02:02:53.880 –> 02:02:56.040
Raymond Bonilla: With Tom. Yep. But Tom and

1609
02:02:56.070 –> 02:02:59.040
John English: Got my invitation yesterday was really excited about that.

1610
02:02:59.100 –> 02:03:07.140
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, that’s awesome. Well, and it was it was supposed to go live. The original day back in, I think, was July. Right. Some sometime in July.

1611
02:03:07.980 –> 02:03:08.910
Raymond Bonilla: Originally going to do it.

1612
02:03:10.680 –> 02:03:11.610
Raymond Bonilla: And so

1613
02:03:14.040 –> 02:03:16.380
Raymond Bonilla: Then all this happen, but you know it’s a

1614
02:03:18.990 –> 02:03:22.260
Raymond Bonilla: It would have been, it would have been hard because then I don’t think a lot of people would have showed up.

1615
02:03:22.650 –> 02:03:26.850
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that we were looking for because everyone would have been at that incredible

1616
02:03:28.140 –> 02:03:32.160
Raymond Bonilla: Awards dinner. I mean, like, that’s an incredible class, you know,

1617
02:03:33.480 –> 02:03:37.980
Raymond Bonilla: BARBER this movie is tax flex your dress dresses.

1618
02:03:39.720 –> 02:03:40.230
Raymond Bonilla: What

1619
02:03:41.820 –> 02:03:43.230
John English: Yeah, pretty good group.

1620
02:03:43.740 –> 02:03:45.810
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, not bad, not bad at all.

1621
02:03:46.380 –> 02:03:52.560
John English: There’s something I know and i feel bad. Sometimes we don’t mention, and we should bring it up is that

1622
02:03:53.970 –> 02:04:03.810
John English: And you can see how important these things are to Ray and Bill and I and other guests that join us. That’s the society of illustrators. If you

1623
02:04:05.010 –> 02:04:16.080
John English: The New York Society of illustrators, an organization that’s basically curated American illustration for the last hundred and 10 or 100 and 510 years and

1624
02:04:17.400 –> 02:04:21.900
John English: It was I know spectrum is kind of eating into it and so has

1625
02:04:23.400 –> 02:04:34.740
John English: The American illustration and Communication Arts annual but when I when I got started, it was everything. It was

1626
02:04:36.180 –> 02:04:42.720
John English: It was the resource book that was originally designed for art as a resource book for art directors to find talent.

1627
02:04:43.350 –> 02:04:43.650
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1628
02:04:43.860 –> 02:04:48.840
John English: Of course spectrum does a really good job of that. I’m glad that they’re here and

1629
02:04:50.460 –> 02:04:54.420
John English: The Community Communication Arts illustration annuals have phenomenal.

1630
02:04:55.620 –> 02:04:57.420
John English: Book with great illustrators in it.

1631
02:04:59.400 –> 02:05:07.320
John English: I have, I have a soft spot for the society, just because of the history that’s connected to it and their Hall of Fame.

1632
02:05:08.460 –> 02:05:17.100
John English: So if you don’t know what we’re talking about Google it. Look it up because it’s it’s really good. And there’s a Los Angeles Society of illustrators.

1633
02:05:17.970 –> 02:05:18.390
Raymond Bonilla: Just

1634
02:05:18.810 –> 02:05:20.430
John English: A really nice publication and

1635
02:05:23.040 –> 02:05:24.510
John English: Show that I used to enter a lot

1636
02:05:26.460 –> 02:05:27.000
Bill Koeb: Of book.

1637
02:05:28.020 –> 02:05:28.470
John English: Pardon me.

1638
02:05:28.560 –> 02:05:29.160
Raymond Bonilla: I just

1639
02:05:29.700 –> 02:05:31.410
Bill Koeb: I don’t think Los Angeles is a book anymore.

1640
02:05:31.500 –> 02:05:33.780
Raymond Bonilla: I don’t think they ever. I don’t think they have a book. They have and

1641
02:05:34.050 –> 02:05:38.100
Raymond Bonilla: They do an online gallery thing. The last time I was. Yeah, there

1642
02:05:39.060 –> 02:05:40.800
Bill Koeb: Is they used to have a book, but

1643
02:05:41.850 –> 02:05:57.330
John English: But for you people that are you know people that are learning about the industry and you’re learning about the history of illustration, and then you’re you want to pursue illustration. Those resource books were designed

1644
02:05:58.500 –> 02:05:59.100
John English: For

1645
02:06:00.240 –> 02:06:05.760
John English: Art Directors to find talent and use them backwards to find the art directors.

1646
02:06:07.200 –> 02:06:13.440
John English: It will help you understand the industry really well. And they’re phenomenal resource and

1647
02:06:14.670 –> 02:06:20.010
John English: It’s something that I think everybody should be aware of. Obviously, they mean a tremendous amount to us.

1648
02:06:21.810 –> 02:06:31.260
John English: And for that reason, you know, it’s like it’s where we learned about how the industry works and you learn where all the all the great work for that year was done.

1649
02:06:31.980 –> 02:06:32.400
Right.

1650
02:06:36.600 –> 02:06:41.700
Raymond Bonilla: And you said you could see you mean it’s such a wonderful slice of history to, you could see

1651
02:06:43.050 –> 02:06:56.880
Raymond Bonilla: What was relevant during the given time period. And what fell out of style what fill in style, and like, I mean, you look at one of those from the 90s, you know, it’s like you just see this breath of just incredible artists that

1652
02:06:58.590 –> 02:07:01.500
Raymond Bonilla: A generation of why some people might not know up you know

1653
02:07:03.150 –> 02:07:03.600
Raymond Bonilla: And

1654
02:07:05.670 –> 02:07:17.880
Raymond Bonilla: You know, and so we we talk. I was talking to actually about this to Tyler actually during our shows about how like you know somebody like juice juice and it’s Thomas, you know,

1655
02:07:19.590 –> 02:07:21.840
Raymond Bonilla: We’re gigantic giants of the field, you know,

1656
02:07:23.520 –> 02:07:34.140
Raymond Bonilla: And, you know, or like let’s say your dad john you know like just a complete giant of this field and illustration, but I bet you more muscle can’t come a point

1657
02:07:35.580 –> 02:07:41.190
Raymond Bonilla: Where more people knew about four is fine art then is then is illustration work right i mean

1658
02:07:42.420 –> 02:07:42.960
John English: Yeah.

1659
02:07:44.040 –> 02:07:44.910
John English: I think so, but

1660
02:07:46.110 –> 02:07:47.730
John English: You know, contemporary for sure.

1661
02:07:48.300 –> 02:07:48.600
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1662
02:07:49.200 –> 02:07:55.560
John English: I mean, I think he’s pretty much solidified his reputation as an illustrator.

1663
02:07:56.130 –> 02:07:57.000
Raymond Bonilla: Totally, totally

1664
02:08:00.390 –> 02:08:03.720
Raymond Bonilla: I guess he’s a bad example somebody like skip lipski or like or

1665
02:08:03.960 –> 02:08:06.690
Raymond Bonilla: rob someone who are wrong. Yeah, exactly.

1666
02:08:06.720 –> 02:08:07.380
John English: He’s the perfect

1667
02:08:07.860 –> 02:08:09.720
Raymond Bonilla: Perfect example perfect example.

1668
02:08:10.740 –> 02:08:16.260
Raymond Bonilla: Because he’s someone who, who, you know, people knew of evolving just like incredible.

1669
02:08:17.490 –> 02:08:31.830
Raymond Bonilla: Fine artwork, you know, and you never knew them, you know, as a really kind of like a bread and butter Illustrator as, as you know, other people would have, you know, given that time period. I mean, you see like I’ve seen

1670
02:08:33.780 –> 02:08:36.270
Raymond Bonilla: Early Works from everyone from, you know,

1671
02:08:37.560 –> 02:08:55.410
Raymond Bonilla: Just how you get to see how all these illustrators started you know that’s that’s like when I talked about pieces that are these that Jonathan. I’ve seen his work in I have old illustration directory stuff to you know where like the old, the old workbooks, you know, or

1672
02:08:56.880 –> 02:09:01.050
Raymond Bonilla: Directly reveal illustration I forgot what it’s called have an upstairs, not the black black

1673
02:09:01.470 –> 02:09:02.130
Bill Koeb: Black Book

1674
02:09:03.210 –> 02:09:03.600
John English: Book

1675
02:09:04.410 –> 02:09:05.700
John English: Book, all those things.

1676
02:09:06.150 –> 02:09:07.950
John English: All the places that took all my money.

1677
02:09:09.360 –> 02:09:09.810
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

1678
02:09:12.540 –> 02:09:13.680
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, you could just see like

1679
02:09:15.750 –> 02:09:19.890
Raymond Bonilla: Like I’ve seen Gary Kelly is planning stuff.

1680
02:09:20.730 –> 02:09:23.970
Raymond Bonilla: Oh yeah, it’s pastel stuff. I mean, that’s like wild.

1681
02:09:25.380 –> 02:09:27.930
Raymond Bonilla: You could see people I could do Nelson when he was a student

1682
02:09:30.990 –> 02:09:33.990
Raymond Bonilla: Spoiler alert. He was still really good as a student, you know,

1683
02:09:36.540 –> 02:09:46.200
Raymond Bonilla: Just, you know, while the Sterling’s work. I used to follow just religiously, you know, but when he was because he was a young up and coming Illustrator. When I was in school.

1684
02:09:51.030 –> 02:09:58.740
Raymond Bonilla: So, you know, it’s a it’s a really great place. I mean, William low. I mean, the list goes on. Like, I mean, you see all these artists that are just

1685
02:09:59.820 –> 02:10:04.440
Raymond Bonilla: You can see how they got their start and you learn so much about art tickets, once you get there you know you

1686
02:10:05.520 –> 02:10:09.660
Raymond Bonilla: You want to see other things to you know and you learn a lot about

1687
02:10:11.610 –> 02:10:17.250
Raymond Bonilla: Just you can learn a lot about painting a lot about design possibilities of things, you know, especially from the older

1688
02:10:20.010 –> 02:10:31.050
Raymond Bonilla: I think the older animals because I think the solutions. A lot of times were had to be, you know, there was only certain ones that was kind of possible with with media, but you could see that they were able to get like

1689
02:10:32.790 –> 02:10:36.900
Raymond Bonilla: These things that were, you know, a lot, a lot more easier to get today.

1690
02:10:37.980 –> 02:10:44.160
Raymond Bonilla: Because of Photoshop, you know, but what they were able to do with things like like the airbrushes the classic example like

1691
02:10:45.210 –> 02:10:51.480
Raymond Bonilla: Like to get those transitions that you can get in Photoshop. Super easy. I mean, it took it took a higher level of skill than what was

1692
02:10:52.980 –> 02:10:59.490
Raymond Bonilla: You know, in order to do that, but that Photoshop kind of wiped out. But, you know, at the, at the very

1693
02:11:00.600 –> 02:11:05.730
Raymond Bonilla: At the end of the day, though, you know, some of these solutions are super interesting. You know, I

1694
02:11:07.230 –> 02:11:17.010
Raymond Bonilla: His name is escaping. There’s an artist who worked on, like, who got like Photoshop ask effects by using oil washes on on on mylar on

1695
02:11:18.540 –> 02:11:23.760
Raymond Bonilla: It or do a larger like he would paint both ends with Sergio something

1696
02:11:25.140 –> 02:11:32.580
Raymond Bonilla: You would paint both sides of like tracing paper. And he had this like beautiful glow of

1697
02:11:33.780 –> 02:11:42.810
Raymond Bonilla: It just like absolutely incredible. But to get that digitally, you would look at it, you’re like, How the heck is that even possible like it you can kind of sort of think about it, but like

1698
02:11:43.650 –> 02:11:53.940
Raymond Bonilla: It would net and you can fake it, but it would never get to that that wonderful like texture of something that was like hand done that imperfection, you know,

1699
02:11:56.940 –> 02:12:04.770
Raymond Bonilla: So yeah, I mean remember her is working, we’re talking about member and like I so I love seeing was looking at his work, you know, again, a lot of

1700
02:12:06.000 –> 02:12:10.050
Raymond Bonilla: Amazing how fresh, a lot of that stuff still looks especially now, you know,

1701
02:12:10.140 –> 02:12:17.160
John English: He was like a rock star coming out of college. I mean, you know, like almost immediately. He was successful.

1702
02:12:17.520 –> 02:12:19.890
Bill Koeb: He was doing time covers coming out of college.

1703
02:12:20.130 –> 02:12:23.070
Tim Trabon: Yeah, you know, it’s really funny because I was just gonna say

1704
02:12:24.120 –> 02:12:32.670
Tim Trabon: John, you know, it’s like, I really like what you tell students often which is like find find out who inspires you, or who you want to

1705
02:12:34.020 –> 02:12:42.540
Tim Trabon: Be like figure out how they got there and I was just about to say. And you’ll often find that there overnight success took 15 years

1706
02:12:43.050 –> 02:12:43.800
John English: Right, yeah.

1707
02:12:45.480 –> 02:12:46.530
John English: That’s true, but

1708
02:12:47.100 –> 02:12:48.570
John English: Not total anomaly.

1709
02:12:49.020 –> 02:12:59.670
John English: Yeah, he was a he went to the illustrators workshop. I remember meeting him when I was a teenager and are very young teenager.

1710
02:13:00.960 –> 02:13:04.320
John English: I think he was in the Greg’s Greg’s class at Art Center.

1711
02:13:04.770 –> 02:13:05.730
John English: Yeah, like

1712
02:13:07.920 –> 02:13:16.050
Tim Trabon: When you are looking for inspiration now i i i this is advice that I feel like I’ve heard the most and it’s like distilled down to one thing and I

1713
02:13:17.340 –> 02:13:18.000
Tim Trabon: I feel like

1714
02:13:19.080 –> 02:13:24.390
Tim Trabon: I’ve heard it echoed by some of the people that talk about their journeys with us john is like

1715
02:13:25.590 –> 02:13:25.980
Tim Trabon: It’s

1716
02:13:27.270 –> 02:13:36.060
Tim Trabon: It’s a lot about time in the market and not timing the market, you know, it’s like just keeping at it. Yeah.

1717
02:13:36.510 –> 02:13:37.920
Tim Trabon: For a long time.

1718
02:13:39.090 –> 02:13:41.250
Tim Trabon: Because it’s this idea that if you quit.

1719
02:13:42.660 –> 02:13:46.110
Tim Trabon: You might quit, like the week before it all happens

1720
02:13:47.190 –> 02:13:47.520
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1721
02:13:47.700 –> 02:13:49.140
Raymond Bonilla: Now, yeah.

1722
02:13:49.590 –> 02:13:53.160
John English: I use Chris at Chris Payne as an example of that all the time because

1723
02:13:54.180 –> 02:13:56.640
John English: I got started well after Kristen.

1724
02:13:58.680 –> 02:14:19.320
John English: And then I got started pretty young and pretty fast and Chris was like a, I don’t want to say he was a good Illustrator really wasn’t like Chris Payne famous he wasn’t wasn’t what he became he was he was really just developing himself and he he wasn’t extremely unique at that point.

1725
02:14:20.340 –> 02:14:25.800
John English: And man, all of a sudden he just exploded its work became very personal and

1726
02:14:29.160 –> 02:14:36.630
John English: He became a rock star, you know, because he found his voice, and he found himself. He just hung at it and just kept doing it.

1727
02:14:37.470 –> 02:14:49.140
Tim Trabon: Oh, I mean, I’m not, I’m not interested in the the overnight success prodigy. You know, I like I love a story of, like, yeah, the hard work was put in

1728
02:14:50.340 –> 02:14:50.700
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1729
02:14:51.600 –> 02:14:59.790
Tim Trabon: A late, late bloomers are great, it, it’s just because it’s some it’s like so many more. Most people, you know,

1730
02:14:59.880 –> 02:15:09.030
Bill Koeb: Right here because I went through a period where I was getting work and then I stopped getting work completely

1731
02:15:10.770 –> 02:15:14.640
Bill Koeb: Along with many, many people that I knew and

1732
02:15:16.740 –> 02:15:21.450
Bill Koeb: There was like a good chunk of time when only a very small number of people were getting work.

1733
02:15:23.670 –> 02:15:26.910
Bill Koeb: And people you know people whose bread and butter was illustration work.

1734
02:15:29.370 –> 02:15:38.460
Bill Koeb: A lot of us on the West Coast like really had to scramble to find other ways to make a living and then just a few years later.

1735
02:15:40.200 –> 02:15:52.080
Bill Koeb: You had a whole new group that’s about 15 years younger than I am just people like their early 40s late 30s, early 40s, we started to do incredibly well.

1736
02:15:54.000 –> 02:15:58.590
Bill Koeb: And kind of a rejuvenation of the illustration market or or illustration

1737
02:15:58.980 –> 02:16:00.060
John English: The Sterling age.

1738
02:16:00.930 –> 02:16:07.290
Bill Koeb: Yeah and there’s it yeah and and like Sterling and then a lot of the guys that sort of studied with Sterling and kind of came after him.

1739
02:16:09.390 –> 02:16:12.570
Bill Koeb: I mean, there’s always been people that have been able to get work consistently.

1740
02:16:15.120 –> 02:16:16.950
Bill Koeb: You know, we’re very, very good.

1741
02:16:18.540 –> 02:16:20.520
Bill Koeb: But they also do a ton of work.

1742
02:16:22.260 –> 02:16:27.450
Bill Koeb: People that do spot illustrations and you just have no idea how many

1743
02:16:28.650 –> 02:16:30.450
Bill Koeb: Illustrations they actually do

1744
02:16:32.520 –> 02:16:35.160
Bill Koeb: Just because phytoestrogens don’t pay very much

1745
02:16:37.800 –> 02:16:38.160
And

1746
02:16:39.360 –> 02:16:39.960
Bill Koeb: So,

1747
02:16:42.870 –> 02:16:47.100
Bill Koeb: The stories. I like the stories like tin cup, you know, the comeback stories.

1748
02:16:47.550 –> 02:16:48.510
Tim Trabon: Mm hmm. Yeah.

1749
02:16:48.870 –> 02:16:50.100
Bill Koeb: Those are the ones that I like.

1750
02:16:50.400 –> 02:16:51.390
Tim Trabon: Bryan Cranston.

1751
02:16:53.340 –> 02:16:53.730
Bill Koeb: Christmas.

1752
02:16:53.760 –> 02:16:56.520
Bill Koeb: Yeah, Christmas career.

1753
02:16:57.870 –> 02:17:00.150
John English: The self made guys I’m Cranston.

1754
02:17:01.650 –> 02:17:02.010
John English: Yeah.

1755
02:17:04.380 –> 02:17:13.230
Tim Trabon: Well, I mean, you know, it was like Malcolm in the Middle. And then all of a sudden it was like iconic television star in his way in his late 40s. Yeah.

1756
02:17:15.120 –> 02:17:17.310
Tim Trabon: I feel like that’s an underdog story.

1757
02:17:17.610 –> 02:17:18.000
But yeah

1758
02:17:19.740 –> 02:17:20.190
Tim Trabon: Yeah.

1759
02:17:20.880 –> 02:17:25.290
John English: So I’m Ray. Do you remember the illustrator Fred items.

1760
02:17:25.830 –> 02:17:26.640
Raymond Bonilla: Of course,

1761
02:17:27.330 –> 02:17:35.250
John English: So friend, you know, he became like a really, really successful very

1762
02:17:37.380 –> 02:17:45.900
John English: Personal with his work great Illustrator great arts and but he you know he started, he was doing those

1763
02:17:47.520 –> 02:17:51.750
John English: You know, like this painted Westerns book covers for years. I mean, just

1764
02:17:52.230 –> 02:17:52.860
Raymond Bonilla: All right.

1765
02:17:52.980 –> 02:18:03.990
John English: All of a sudden, you know, in his late 40s early 50s, he became Fred hotness yeah he’s got all these like Western covers that were traditionally painted

1766
02:18:04.770 –> 02:18:05.580
Raymond Bonilla: In hitting me

1767
02:18:05.760 –> 02:18:06.360
John English: Wow.

1768
02:18:06.570 –> 02:18:07.590
Raymond Bonilla: I didn’t know that, wow.

1769
02:18:07.710 –> 02:18:19.380
John English: He was, he was probably my dad’s closest friend in Connecticut. And, you know, it had my dad said he taught him a lot about

1770
02:18:19.860 –> 02:18:33.180
John English: The painting world. I mean, because friends interest was the contemporary painting scene in New York. And so he used they used to go together to the city all the time and go to all the gallery. Oh, you know, galleries and look at contemporary painting.

1771
02:18:33.810 –> 02:18:34.200
Right.

1772
02:18:35.370 –> 02:18:35.850
Raymond Bonilla: Wow.

1773
02:18:36.120 –> 02:18:43.350
John English: Thread educating really helped educate him just because it is understanding of the New York art world.

1774
02:18:44.430 –> 02:18:46.590
John English: But Pret Fred wasn’t able to

1775
02:18:48.360 –> 02:19:00.870
John English: I guess, make it happen on his own work until you know he was he was in his late 40s early 50s and then he became this super success of this really innovative.

1776
02:19:01.680 –> 02:19:09.840
John English: Thing that had never been done before and it was very personal. It was very, you know, so you never know when that you know that’s going to happen.

1777
02:19:10.650 –> 02:19:25.920
John English: Yeah, forever. And it might happen at a really Lake time I use Chris’s an example to because it wasn’t that I’m Chris wasn’t that old when it happened, but he had been working as an illustrator for 1213 years before it explodes.

1778
02:19:27.240 –> 02:19:39.330
Tim Trabon: Somebody won the Academy Award for Best Screenplay. This is like six or seven years ago. He had he had never written a screenplay before and he was like 84

1779
02:19:39.870 –> 02:19:40.710
John English: Oh my gosh.

1780
02:19:41.580 –> 02:19:43.170
Tim Trabon: acceptance speech, he just said.

1781
02:19:44.040 –> 02:19:44.550
Tim Trabon: He went up.

1782
02:19:44.760 –> 02:19:49.230
Tim Trabon: He went up to the mic and he just goes so i i guess i’m a late bloomer.

1783
02:19:53.520 –> 02:20:02.850
Tim Trabon: I’ll try and get all the details on that. But yeah, that’s such a yeah john like you’re saying it’s like, and somebody just said, you know, it shows you

1784
02:20:03.360 –> 02:20:16.980
Tim Trabon: You never know who’s paying attention. I didn’t notice it. It’s maybe true I’m trusting the person who posted it that Vince Gilligan remembered Bryan Cranston just from like a random X Files episode.

1785
02:20:19.500 –> 02:20:21.330
Tim Trabon: And you’re like, you’re like, That’s wild.

1786
02:20:22.380 –> 02:20:24.240
Tim Trabon: It’s like you never know. Like you might get

1787
02:20:24.360 –> 02:20:29.040
Tim Trabon: You know, it could be a Vince Gilligan wrote the episode. Okay, well, like

1788
02:20:30.510 –> 02:20:35.940
Tim Trabon: You know your life can change with one phone call or with one new friendship, you know,

1789
02:20:36.630 –> 02:20:37.050
Now,

1790
02:20:38.430 –> 02:20:41.160
Tim Trabon: A FRIENDSHIP because like you should you should nice to people.

1791
02:20:41.760 –> 02:20:43.890
Bill Koeb: Was yeah that was something I heard about

1792
02:20:45.300 –> 02:20:56.130
Bill Koeb: From a friend of mine who’s a film editor and he said that you know in in the movie business that the person who’s serving you lunch might end up being the producer, like a few years later, so

1793
02:20:57.240 –> 02:21:01.260
Tim Trabon: Oh, I feel I learned it really quickly and maybe I’m giving myself too much credit, but

1794
02:21:03.600 –> 02:21:09.210
Tim Trabon: I felt like I did pretty well as a photo assistant and I was a really bad photo assist

1795
02:21:12.390 –> 02:21:15.720
Raymond Bonilla: Your, your right to me. You are giving you some way too much credit

1796
02:21:15.750 –> 02:21:23.190
Tim Trabon: No, but I thought it was because I was like I befriended the people I wanted to assist you know

1797
02:21:23.310 –> 02:21:29.820
Tim Trabon: Right. Right. Yeah. And they were like, man, feel bad for Timmy gotta throw them a bone.

1798
02:21:30.930 –> 02:21:32.820
Raymond Bonilla: Which is really bad. I mean, like what I

1799
02:21:35.730 –> 02:21:38.640
John English: Mean you were smart, your turn. Say,

1800
02:21:40.470 –> 02:21:40.980
Raymond Bonilla: Go.

1801
02:21:45.390 –> 02:21:52.980
Raymond Bonilla: To what you were saying bill about like also just market changing and things like that. You just don’t know. I mean, like,

1802
02:21:54.090 –> 02:22:10.500
Raymond Bonilla: I, I, I might my early my early career. I tried to escalate by by trying to do fantasy work and I thought that’s what I was, I had to do to make a living and it’s and I can find work, but it was never enough, you know,

1803
02:22:10.560 –> 02:22:12.750
Raymond Bonilla: Right. And it wasn’t until like I

1804
02:22:14.010 –> 02:22:21.210
Raymond Bonilla: Started decided to take a job doing theater posters, you know, for my local university. The university, I had a teacher.

1805
02:22:22.860 –> 02:22:31.800
Raymond Bonilla: That I started to win awards, because it was work that I actually wanted to do and work that you know it was just the perfect fit, fit you know

1806
02:22:34.500 –> 02:22:36.270
Raymond Bonilla: And and then from that, I mean, I

1807
02:22:37.680 –> 02:22:47.610
Raymond Bonilla: You know and I struggled for years while my, I went to school with a lot of artists who were doing really well coming out of school really quickly.

1808
02:22:48.030 –> 02:22:48.510
Bill Koeb: Oh, yeah.

1809
02:22:48.540 –> 02:22:52.470
Raymond Bonilla: And so, you know, when you have that, you know, it was just one of those classes like

1810
02:22:53.550 –> 02:22:58.890
Raymond Bonilla: With George talks about the class that he went with right with like Kent WILLIAMS WITH JOHN van flea

1811
02:22:59.910 –> 02:23:00.810
John English: Archie Rolla

1812
02:23:01.200 –> 02:23:07.890
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah Marcelo, you know, oh god I love materialism work is he, he’s another one, study, study

1813
02:23:07.890 –> 02:23:10.890
Bill Koeb: Go. Here’s a new project, he’s working on a baseball book.

1814
02:23:12.480 –> 02:23:13.080
Raymond Bonilla: Oh really,

1815
02:23:13.290 –> 02:23:16.260
Bill Koeb: Yeah, another baseball book. Yeah, man.

1816
02:23:16.560 –> 02:23:17.430
Bill Koeb: So, though.

1817
02:23:18.090 –> 02:23:18.900
Raymond Bonilla: He’s so good.

1818
02:23:19.530 –> 02:23:20.160
Bill Koeb: Hey back

1819
02:23:20.610 –> 02:23:25.590
Tim Trabon: I’m sorry to interrupt that but john if I were to leave now.

1820
02:23:26.670 –> 02:23:29.340
Tim Trabon: With a. Are you guys gonna burn down this zoom room.

1821
02:23:30.180 –> 02:23:30.720
Of course,

1822
02:23:34.050 –> 02:23:37.980
Tim Trabon: Yeah, okay. Is everything all right.

1823
02:23:38.370 –> 02:23:40.200
Raymond Bonilla: There it is gonna be fine to be

1824
02:23:43.230 –> 02:23:43.920
You later.

1825
02:23:45.540 –> 02:23:46.350
Raymond Bonilla: Is he gone yet.

1826
02:23:50.220 –> 02:23:52.920
Tim Trabon: I’m gonna do the fake leave I’ll rejoin as an attendee

1827
02:23:55.560 –> 02:23:58.890
John English: Keeps texting me. He goes, Man, you told me he was going to leave a lot earlier.

1828
02:23:58.890 –> 02:24:04.440
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. Yeah, it’s like really taken a lot of Timmy minutes to get out of here.

1829
02:24:04.500 –> 02:24:05.760
Tim Trabon: I’ve enjoyed the company.

1830
02:24:07.350 –> 02:24:08.400
Bill Koeb: Thing where you walk away.

1831
02:24:08.490 –> 02:24:09.990
Bill Koeb: In like make your step sound really

1832
02:24:10.020 –> 02:24:11.550
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah yeah yeah

1833
02:24:15.870 –> 02:24:20.910
Tim Trabon: Yeah, exactly. Now, really great hanging out with you guys tonight. Thanks.

1834
02:24:21.540 –> 02:24:22.980
Raymond Bonilla: For joining us to me. Yeah.

1835
02:24:23.040 –> 02:24:26.550
Raymond Bonilla: Thanks for having me. Let letting me in the room. Sorry, hit the wrong button.

1836
02:24:27.120 –> 02:24:27.540
Sorry.

1837
02:24:29.490 –> 02:24:31.230
Tim Trabon: I’ll post my drawings

1838
02:24:32.460 –> 02:24:32.850
Tim Trabon: Later.

1839
02:24:35.130 –> 02:24:35.400
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

1840
02:24:35.430 –> 02:24:36.720
Raymond Bonilla: You’re working on an off camera.

1841
02:24:37.230 –> 02:24:37.800
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, got it.

1842
02:24:40.020 –> 02:24:40.410
Tim Trabon: All right.

1843
02:24:40.680 –> 02:24:42.330
Bill Koeb: Well that’s good because I’m done so.

1844
02:24:47.730 –> 02:24:49.650
John English: Drop for a couple more minutes, guys.

1845
02:24:50.070 –> 02:24:50.640
Raymond Bonilla: Sounds good.

1846
02:24:53.580 –> 02:24:58.440
John English: I got distracted. I was trying to find a book to show ray and I never found it.

1847
02:24:59.970 –> 02:25:03.330
Bill Koeb: And I like that line around the figure you got going there john

1848
02:25:03.720 –> 02:25:05.070
John English: Thanks part of the

1849
02:25:06.450 –> 02:25:11.970
John English: Part of the book collection. I got from my father after he passed away. I got the original

1850
02:25:13.560 –> 02:25:18.750
John English: Like paperbacks of the original Society of illustrators annuals.

1851
02:25:19.140 –> 02:25:20.760
Raymond Bonilla: Whoa, whoa.

1852
02:25:23.220 –> 02:25:27.450
Raymond Bonilla: I was gonna ask you that, because I’ve, I’ve read, I’ve

1853
02:25:28.890 –> 02:25:46.200
Raymond Bonilla: I’ve looked at the first the first annual ever. And there was a you were talking about how like it was designed to get people illustrators hired by our art director. So that was like one place that art directors could go to Africa who worked at Ford was it Albert Dorn or Robert faucet.

1854
02:25:48.000 –> 02:25:48.480
John English: For

1855
02:25:48.510 –> 02:25:54.330
Raymond Bonilla: Wrote down for that first because the first annual for society of illustrators.

1856
02:25:54.540 –> 02:25:55.050
John English: I gotta go.

1857
02:25:56.100 –> 02:25:59.550
John English: Probably. Probably Dorn but

1858
02:26:00.870 –> 02:26:01.710
John English: Could be faucet.

1859
02:26:02.820 –> 02:26:03.030
John English: Because

1860
02:26:03.240 –> 02:26:09.900
Raymond Bonilla: He explained that he literally said exactly what you were saying like, just like you know it’s like we’ve seen a need for them, you know,

1861
02:26:11.220 –> 02:26:20.220
Raymond Bonilla: A place that people can go that’s the greatest examples of illustrations been doing today. It’s like a collected place of that you know we can promote

1862
02:26:20.730 –> 02:26:32.250
Raymond Bonilla: And have illustration grow. So in so I can grow with you know in in the number of patrons that it’s supported and I thought it was like, oh yeah, wow, that’s, that’s really cool the way they

1863
02:26:33.570 –> 02:26:39.630
Raymond Bonilla: See it because I’ve never seen somebody explain it like that. It was always just a fixed was just always a thing. You know, when I was

1864
02:26:39.660 –> 02:26:45.540
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, coming up. I just never knew that there was like, oh, this was a reason somebody had to put this together. It’s like, you know, like it.

1865
02:26:45.840 –> 02:26:50.010
John English: It was right. You know that our directors, could you know find them.

1866
02:26:50.700 –> 02:26:53.310
John English: Right in choose to choose the town.

1867
02:26:54.780 –> 02:26:55.170
Bill Koeb: You know,

1868
02:26:57.060 –> 02:26:58.290
Bill Koeb: Take it in your own hands.

1869
02:26:59.430 –> 02:26:59.820
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1870
02:27:00.720 –> 02:27:01.230
Raymond Bonilla: Now the

1871
02:27:01.890 –> 02:27:08.310
John English: Difference with spectrum does now and all the other angles and it’s it’s really important to the industry.

1872
02:27:09.750 –> 02:27:27.060
John English: Else think it’s really important that you know people getting started out, understand that you can use those you know art directors don’t do a great job finding new talent. I don’t, I don’t think they, the way they pursue it is by the people that pursue them. Yeah.

1873
02:27:27.090 –> 02:27:27.420
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1874
02:27:27.480 –> 02:27:29.820
John English: Gives you the the information to pursue them.

1875
02:27:31.080 –> 02:27:35.280
John English: I talked about it all the time students. It’s like use this stuff. The other way.

1876
02:27:36.300 –> 02:27:49.380
Bill Koeb: I mean, I spent hours like going through Communication Arts or the illustrators angels or whatever it is to get to build list of people to

1877
02:27:50.040 –> 02:27:50.280
John English: You

1878
02:27:50.460 –> 02:27:51.540
Raymond Bonilla: Because, absolutely.

1879
02:27:51.660 –> 02:27:58.560
Bill Koeb: You can not only see you can not only see who did who did the work. What kind of work. They’re using

1880
02:28:00.360 –> 02:28:03.690
Bill Koeb: And get an idea of the subject matter. But you can also

1881
02:28:05.010 –> 02:28:10.560
Bill Koeb: You can discover publications that you may not have known about or or clients may not have known about it.

1882
02:28:10.920 –> 02:28:12.030
John English: They did it for and

1883
02:28:12.420 –> 02:28:14.580
Bill Koeb: Yeah, and who the art director was and

1884
02:28:16.110 –> 02:28:18.000
John English: The whole bit it’s it’s all there.

1885
02:28:19.260 –> 02:28:20.100
John English: It’s very helpful.

1886
02:28:21.180 –> 02:28:31.410
Bill Koeb: I mean that’s that’s what those books, besides looking at the artwork. I mean, that’s what those books, you know, for illustrators. At least I mean

1887
02:28:32.730 –> 02:28:33.600
Bill Koeb: That’s what they’re for.

1888
02:28:34.170 –> 02:28:35.160
Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

1889
02:28:35.550 –> 02:28:45.630
John English: That was it. You know, when I went to the awards night this year. It was a big I had been in but five or six years and I made me think.

1890
02:28:46.650 –> 02:28:48.630
John English: I forgot because it had already happened, but

1891
02:28:49.860 –> 02:29:00.030
John English: Like when I used to go to those nights. You saw that all you saw was original pieces. Sorry, I just see these printed. You know, a lot of printed versions, not a lot of originals.

1892
02:29:02.970 –> 02:29:11.340
John English: It was such a great thing to see, you know, some of this illustration work, you know, to walk up to it and see when people were painting, you know,

1893
02:29:11.400 –> 02:29:16.470
John English: Yeah, certainly see this just great works, you know, beautiful drawing and painting.

1894
02:29:17.580 –> 02:29:29.490
John English: And it was, it was still a really fun thing to see. And all of that but I missed the that feeling of, Wow, all this original stuff is here.

1895
02:29:30.090 –> 02:29:33.120
Raymond Bonilla: No actual piece there. There it is right there. There’s a

1896
02:29:33.120 –> 02:29:39.480
Montalvo Machado: Random yeah had a chance to to go to the side of illustrators, and the

1897
02:29:40.920 –> 02:29:44.070
Montalvo Machado: What was his name was the official house in New York.

1898
02:29:44.550 –> 02:29:45.930
Raymond Bonilla: Oh yeah, Roger.

1899
02:29:46.770 –> 02:29:48.000
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah. Roger.

1900
02:29:49.230 –> 02:29:50.550
John English: Myself, I said Walter. He

1901
02:29:52.950 –> 02:29:54.930
Montalvo Machado: Was there. He opened the door for me.

1902
02:29:56.160 –> 02:30:01.140
Montalvo Machado: Was so incredible. And he showed me around and all this original artworks.

1903
02:30:01.500 –> 02:30:14.820
Montalvo Machado: It was, I think it was a second time that I was the illustration Academy. I went back to New York. I went back through New York and spend a couple of days there and had the chance to see all this regional art Brooks.

1904
02:30:15.990 –> 02:30:24.330
Montalvo Machado: As you were saying john is just really amazing to see the real thing. The artwork itself. It’s so inspiring.

1905
02:30:25.110 –> 02:30:27.720
Bill Koeb: I had a similar experience when I went to the

1906
02:30:28.950 –> 02:30:36.780
Bill Koeb: Society of illustrators in in 2014 and I remember they had the portraits of all the past

1907
02:30:38.490 –> 02:30:39.270
Raymond Bonilla: Cool, yeah.

1908
02:30:39.510 –> 02:30:41.760
Bill Koeb: There’s like an Austin breaks drawing right there.

1909
02:30:44.790 –> 02:30:45.120
Yeah.

1910
02:30:48.120 –> 02:30:48.810
Raymond Bonilla: God, yeah.

1911
02:30:49.110 –> 02:30:50.400
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, I could, yeah.

1912
02:30:51.090 –> 02:30:52.470
Montalvo Machado: But Pico regionals

1913
02:30:52.620 –> 02:31:06.000
Raymond Bonilla: And about yeah that illustration outs. I remember, I would go every single time I was in in town to visit my parents, and he was like talking to Walter Reed was like

1914
02:31:07.530 –> 02:31:15.270
Raymond Bonilla: It was like meeting. I don’t even know who who I can equate it to but like he’s, he saw he actually saw the Cornwall pay

1915
02:31:15.690 –> 02:31:26.700
Raymond Bonilla: They don’t like the new Norman Rockwell he knew all these people and there was like a direct connection between you know what I was studying and and the art that I loved and him, you know,

1916
02:31:27.900 –> 02:31:33.690
Raymond Bonilla: It’s just this wild, you know, I felt like I could just ask him any question I wanted he’d be able to answer it, you know.

1917
02:31:37.590 –> 02:31:38.520
Montalvo Machado: You mean what read

1918
02:31:39.150 –> 02:31:40.170
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah well read. Yeah.

1919
02:31:40.290 –> 02:31:41.340
Montalvo Machado: Yeah, okay.

1920
02:31:41.670 –> 02:31:45.630
Raymond Bonilla: I said, what was the climate like you know and what was, you know,

1921
02:31:46.740 –> 02:31:58.350
Raymond Bonilla: Because I did you ever meet. You know, I’ll just do this like I was like a kid, you know, it was like 25, you know, it was like what was. Did you know Norman Rockwell, you know,

1922
02:32:02.130 –> 02:32:05.130
Raymond Bonilla: What was he like, you know, What did it smell like you know that’s

1923
02:32:07.410 –> 02:32:18.570
Raymond Bonilla: Why we were like, he brought me into the back. He’s like, Oh, I just got this poster was original painted for a lobby like King Kong poster that they had. It was like in Guam.

1924
02:32:19.980 –> 02:32:30.720
Raymond Bonilla: On a piece of wood and we were looking at it and analyzing it with them in, like, you know, off to the sounds like a top level and I’ll Harvey done, you know, and they’re just like, oh my god.

1925
02:32:32.970 –> 02:32:41.130
Montalvo Machado: I was shocked. I had that impression and he showed me just there was a there was a second room like a backdoor or something like that.

1926
02:32:41.730 –> 02:32:42.240
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

1927
02:32:42.870 –> 02:32:48.660
Montalvo Machado: He started showing me some some rough sketches from line Decker non Rocco all these guys.

1928
02:32:48.690 –> 02:32:49.860
Raymond Bonilla: Oh my god.

1929
02:32:50.400 –> 02:32:54.450
Montalvo Machado: And it’s a different experience when you see the process.

1930
02:32:54.510 –> 02:32:55.590
Raymond Bonilla: Was just like oh yeah

1931
02:32:55.950 –> 02:32:57.750
Bill Koeb: He’s, he’s working hard, you know,

1932
02:32:57.840 –> 02:32:59.520
Raymond Bonilla: He was done. Yeah.

1933
02:33:00.090 –> 02:33:09.390
Montalvo Machado: That was such an incredible day such incredible experience being there and meeting Walter Reed is just, you know, he was actually

1934
02:33:11.280 –> 02:33:13.230
Montalvo Machado: He, he saw the whole thing happen.

1935
02:33:13.800 –> 02:33:14.250
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1936
02:33:15.060 –> 02:33:22.560
Montalvo Machado: He was a testimony of whatever we we have learned from books and, you know, hear about. He was there and

1937
02:33:22.590 –> 02:33:26.460
Montalvo Machado: He was right it right. It’s really interesting.

1938
02:33:27.570 –> 02:33:27.780
Montalvo Machado: And

1939
02:33:27.990 –> 02:33:29.850
John English: More current way.

1940
02:33:31.050 –> 02:33:32.910
John English: That’s, you know, having Terry brown around

1941
02:33:33.450 –> 02:33:34.890
Raymond Bonilla: I just gotta say it was like

1942
02:33:36.480 –> 02:33:40.890
John English: The personal experiences, he had with the group of artists are unbelievable.

1943
02:33:41.580 –> 02:33:41.940
Yeah.

1944
02:33:44.190 –> 02:33:53.790
Raymond Bonilla: It’s just need people like that that that link so that you could that you could tell other younger generations. What it was like and and preserve what was great about it and

1945
02:33:55.590 –> 02:33:58.170
Raymond Bonilla: You know, I think it’s just absolutely essential.

1946
02:33:59.610 –> 02:34:00.990
Bill Koeb: Talking to Terry’s definitely I

1947
02:34:02.610 –> 02:34:04.350
Raymond Bonilla: Man, I would love to sit down and just

1948
02:34:05.400 –> 02:34:09.060
Raymond Bonilla: Talk you know shop. I was bummed that I was out of town for that talk.

1949
02:34:11.460 –> 02:34:13.080
Raymond Bonilla: Because it’s like, man.

1950
02:34:17.190 –> 02:34:19.230
Raymond Bonilla: Talking to you guys is like talking like you know

1951
02:34:20.580 –> 02:34:28.530
Raymond Bonilla: I mean, I’m on the I feel like the kid in the in the crowd that got pulled up on stage sort of thing, you know, hey, you know,

1952
02:34:33.360 –> 02:34:34.200
Raymond Bonilla: It so like

1953
02:34:35.850 –> 02:34:37.830
Raymond Bonilla: You know, just saying this, things like

1954
02:34:39.990 –> 02:34:43.590
Raymond Bonilla: What you guys have experienced and also just like

1955
02:34:44.700 –> 02:34:48.900
Raymond Bonilla: What illustration was back then, and you, you saw the whole thing you saw the whole curve.

1956
02:34:50.010 –> 02:34:55.350
Raymond Bonilla: Coming through because what you when you were, you know, both you guys were studying illustration. It was

1957
02:34:56.610 –> 02:35:03.390
Raymond Bonilla: You know, if you were to compare it to what illustration is today, it’s kind of, it’s almost like a completely different thing, you know.

1958
02:35:05.610 –> 02:35:18.630
Raymond Bonilla: And just, it’s cool to learn. Let’s learn the first like this stuff is cyclical this stuff changes all the time. It’s always evolving and it’s never in a fixed position and, you know, learning how to think as

1959
02:35:20.160 –> 02:35:26.910
Raymond Bonilla: Becoming an artist with a voice in our personal voice and not just like chasing style, you know. Yeah.

1960
02:35:27.570 –> 02:35:38.070
Raymond Bonilla: I mean like that that’s not just from, like, oh, you know, something you read from a fortune cookie. It’s like, no, it’s because this is how you have like a long and prosperous career like we

1961
02:35:38.880 –> 02:35:52.770
Raymond Bonilla: Look at Chris Payne, I’m like a nobody could do Chris Payne and that’s the reason why he’s are like Gary Kelly, like that’s reason why these guys have long already to Coons you know just long, long prolific careers. They just didn’t

1962
02:35:54.330 –> 02:35:59.430
Raymond Bonilla: Have a good three years or five years, you know, and I think that’s just a testament to

1963
02:36:01.020 –> 02:36:02.340
Raymond Bonilla: You know, there are the street, you know,

1964
02:36:03.660 –> 02:36:09.930
John English: It’s, it’s hard to stay in the business for a long time.

1965
02:36:10.440 –> 02:36:10.830
Right.

1966
02:36:12.390 –> 02:36:12.870
John English: And it’s

1967
02:36:14.250 –> 02:36:22.410
John English: usually requires to stay in the business, it really requires you probably are going to have to reinvent yourself a few times, that’s for sure.

1968
02:36:22.890 –> 02:36:23.310
Right.

1969
02:36:26.610 –> 02:36:29.160
Raymond Bonilla: But think about how many people don’t write and

1970
02:36:30.750 –> 02:36:35.640
Raymond Bonilla: Just don’t have the meat at this don’t know how to do it. They maybe they just got work and

1971
02:36:37.200 –> 02:36:42.180
Raymond Bonilla: You know, there’s never thought anything of and they always thought that this was just going to happen forever, you know,

1972
02:36:43.530 –> 02:36:48.480
Raymond Bonilla: And then they were just now in different realms. You know, so just to see somebody like

1973
02:36:49.980 –> 02:36:53.100
Raymond Bonilla: Talking about reinventing yourself like Bernie Fuchs classic example like

1974
02:36:54.900 –> 02:36:59.580
Raymond Bonilla: I mean man had multiple illustration careers in one lifetime, you know,

1975
02:37:03.360 –> 02:37:12.270
Raymond Bonilla: And just to think about that or your dad’s classic example he wasn’t doing that if you show it. People his car illustrations is

1976
02:37:13.560 –> 02:37:15.060
Raymond Bonilla: Less than just say let’s pick is

1977
02:37:16.770 –> 02:37:19.110
Raymond Bonilla: The car. The car. The car stuff.

1978
02:37:20.340 –> 02:37:34.470
Raymond Bonilla: Let’s say pick little women and that is his landscapes, you know, and then also the last things he was doing and you would just put them up against somebody and say, you know, what are these have in common. They probably going to tell you is like the same Mario’s

1979
02:37:35.940 –> 02:37:43.950
Raymond Bonilla: I mean, unless you knew of his work and you could you could see like the you know the string going through. But to say that that was the same artist. It’s kind of nuts, you know,

1980
02:37:45.060 –> 02:37:49.560
Montalvo Machado: There was a consistency in his work, even, even if it’s such a different media.

1981
02:37:49.680 –> 02:37:50.760
Raymond Bonilla: Just like. Right, right.

1982
02:37:50.820 –> 02:37:59.250
Montalvo Machado: Oils or pastels, or you know that that black thing that he used to do and the canvas. What’s that called. Is it cold.

1983
02:37:59.820 –> 02:38:01.020
Raymond Bonilla: Like tar. Yeah.

1984
02:38:01.080 –> 02:38:01.410
Our

1985
02:38:02.490 –> 02:38:07.920
Montalvo Machado: Our paintings and everything is got this connection, you could recognize this, the artist.

1986
02:38:08.490 –> 02:38:18.990
Raymond Bonilla: Totally, totally it I guess it’s more so, like how it was. It’s an artist doing it’s their personality but applied completely differently, like

1987
02:38:19.860 –> 02:38:38.220
Raymond Bonilla: You would never think that you know did you know it was okay, you know, marketing is is doing ads car ads in Detroit, you know, with these like super rented cars with these wonderfully designed figures having that combination and then going like into this cause I like

1988
02:38:40.500 –> 02:38:44.820
Raymond Bonilla: Like Fred out and assess like collage painted over and glaze down, you know,

1989
02:38:45.360 –> 02:38:54.750
Raymond Bonilla: And then going from there to, like, oh, I’m just gonna do these abstract landscapes, like you see the strength and design through all of them, for sure, you know, no question about that but

1990
02:38:55.800 –> 02:39:01.320
Raymond Bonilla: I caught it just makes you think, like, how many people can actually have done that because that that takes also

1991
02:39:02.280 –> 02:39:13.440
Raymond Bonilla: A leap of faith and also just knowing that you constantly pushing yourself. You know, like I like what john was saying in terms of like Fred on this or like Bob and Dell and those

1992
02:39:14.670 –> 02:39:22.890
Raymond Bonilla: Those artists like you just constantly you never satisfied that they’re never stuck in like a fixed point in time.

1993
02:39:23.370 –> 02:39:24.780
Bill Koeb: We’re always chasing something

1994
02:39:25.410 –> 02:39:26.370
Raymond Bonilla: Right, right.

1995
02:39:26.430 –> 02:39:27.960
Bill Koeb: Which you’re chasing changes.

1996
02:39:28.440 –> 02:39:28.800
Raymond Bonilla: Right.

1997
02:39:29.100 –> 02:39:31.620
Montalvo Machado: You know it does.

1998
02:39:32.250 –> 02:39:39.990
Bill Koeb: And then as you chase it. You discover new things that interest you. And then you’re learning, you know, I mean,

1999
02:39:41.700 –> 02:39:44.760
Bill Koeb: going out and doing those landscapes, just the couple that have done.

2000
02:39:46.230 –> 02:39:48.630
Bill Koeb: It’s really affecting how I’m thinking about color.

2001
02:39:49.530 –> 02:39:49.950
Bill Koeb: A lot

2002
02:39:50.550 –> 02:39:54.150
Bill Koeb: And I think about color a ton. You know, I mean,

2003
02:39:57.270 –> 02:39:59.370
Bill Koeb: Color is a huge thing for me, you know,

2004
02:40:00.630 –> 02:40:02.340
Bill Koeb: But it’s really thinking about

2005
02:40:03.390 –> 02:40:15.240
Bill Koeb: I had to quickly mix colors and get certain colors and warms and cools in a, in a very, very compressed way. Mm hmm where I don’t have time to think about it and

2006
02:40:17.250 –> 02:40:20.340
Bill Koeb: You know, I just kind of have to find the color and the value

2007
02:40:22.290 –> 02:40:25.500
Bill Koeb: So it’s, it’s, you know, it’s a learning experience.

2008
02:40:26.370 –> 02:40:31.260
Bill Koeb: Totally but I can see how it’s affected even how I approach.

2009
02:40:33.180 –> 02:40:35.520
Bill Koeb: Like an abstract thing or for whatever

2010
02:40:36.690 –> 02:40:45.060
Montalvo Machado: Reason photography when you when you’re clicking something I think it all. It all goes through the same process mental process, I think.

2011
02:40:46.350 –> 02:40:46.770
Bill Koeb: Yeah.

2012
02:40:47.130 –> 02:40:57.420
Montalvo Machado: Pictures. I’m thinking of illustration, it’s funny. I’m thinking of cropping things and you know composition and lights and darks. It’s all the same thing for me is just different media.

2013
02:40:58.530 –> 02:41:05.250
Bill Koeb: Yeah, absolutely. And I mean this is a this is a little quick study I did.

2014
02:41:05.520 –> 02:41:06.030
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah.

2015
02:41:06.600 –> 02:41:17.880
Bill Koeb: And it’s just, I mean, it’s like watercolor and house paint and it’s purposefully just a few colors not paying attention to the color of the thing itself is black and white photo but

2016
02:41:19.740 –> 02:41:21.540
Bill Koeb: That approach.

2017
02:41:23.760 –> 02:41:25.020
Bill Koeb: Informed like

2018
02:41:26.070 –> 02:41:29.910
Bill Koeb: Doing that sketch informed how I’m going to deal with that.

2019
02:41:30.480 –> 02:41:32.490
Montalvo Machado: Right, or as a value. Right.

2020
02:41:38.250 –> 02:41:39.030
Raymond Bonilla: I think. Yeah.

2021
02:41:39.780 –> 02:41:51.120
Montalvo Machado: You were talking about continuity and things. And I remember, I think it was Marshall Arizona this said once that every drawing that you do carries the memory of every drawing that you have done before.

2022
02:41:51.690 –> 02:41:52.440
Raymond Bonilla: I love that. Cool.

2023
02:41:53.310 –> 02:41:54.510
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that’s beautiful.

2024
02:41:54.900 –> 02:42:13.470
Montalvo Machado: I had to. I had to stop and you know I was written the book in this flip the book and I kept thinking about that. It’s a memory thing. Everything that you do today as a draftsman carries the memories of what you have done for your whole life, it’s, it’s all building, building up thing.

2025
02:42:14.790 –> 02:42:25.950
Montalvo Machado: And it’s beautiful. Because you you never get old in this profession because you’re always chasing or is looking for something new, something else. This is fascinating for me.

2026
02:42:27.480 –> 02:42:28.920
Montalvo Machado: There’s something so much to learn.

2027
02:42:31.740 –> 02:42:32.340
Raymond Bonilla: Well, I mean,

2028
02:42:33.030 –> 02:42:36.090
John English: I figured you guys talk long enough, I might get my drawing done

2029
02:42:39.060 –> 02:42:40.260
Montalvo Machado: I’m here watching

2030
02:42:41.370 –> 02:42:43.740
Montalvo Machado: I have made my things done here by now.

2031
02:42:45.720 –> 02:42:52.830
Montalvo Machado: I was doing a lot of image research and you know getting getting the mood of the job that I’m getting into

2032
02:42:58.200 –> 02:43:00.270
Bill Koeb: Sorry Montalvo

2033
02:43:00.750 –> 02:43:01.590
Montalvo Machado: Yes, or just

2034
02:43:01.860 –> 02:43:05.040
Bill Koeb: STARTING TO TALK LIKE MY audio cut out

2035
02:43:06.480 –> 02:43:06.780
Montalvo Machado: Oh,

2036
02:43:07.320 –> 02:43:08.670
Bill Koeb: Right, I heard nothing

2037
02:43:09.060 –> 02:43:12.180
Raymond Bonilla: Well, it’s a good thing because he had some choice words for you, man.

2038
02:43:12.630 –> 02:43:14.670
Montalvo Machado: Oh, you don’t want to

2039
02:43:15.120 –> 02:43:16.470
Raymond Bonilla: You know, want to know, you know,

2040
02:43:18.420 –> 02:43:19.830
Bill Koeb: Go back and watch the replay.

2041
02:43:21.240 –> 02:43:22.170
Bill Koeb: Or you could just repeat

2042
02:43:22.320 –> 02:43:24.390
Montalvo Machado: God, yeah, you’re gonna you’re gonna see it.

2043
02:43:24.870 –> 02:43:26.940
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, you forgot. I don’t know. I don’t know what he was

2044
02:43:32.070 –> 02:43:34.950
John English: Alright, so let’s bounce around the room, real quick.

2045
02:43:35.370 –> 02:43:35.730
Okay.

2046
02:43:39.210 –> 02:43:44.430
John English: I gotta get Wait a second. I spoke too soon. I got pastel I can’t touch my computer yet.

2047
02:43:46.050 –> 02:43:47.430
Montalvo Machado: That’s a beautiful baby john

2048
02:43:48.900 –> 02:43:49.410
That’s

2049
02:43:50.670 –> 02:43:51.060
Oh, no.

2050
02:43:52.560 –> 02:43:54.600
John English: It’s it’s immediate. It’s crude

2051
02:43:57.480 –> 02:43:59.580
John English: I got fingerprints all over it real badly.

2052
02:44:00.180 –> 02:44:01.740
Montalvo Machado: I can’t see from the south.

2053
02:44:03.780 –> 02:44:06.240
Montalvo Machado: From this, this part of the planet that is just

2054
02:44:09.030 –> 02:44:10.440
Raymond Bonilla: It looks good from this side of the

2055
02:44:11.280 –> 02:44:11.940
Hemisphere.

2056
02:44:17.310 –> 02:44:17.850
John English: Here we go.

2057
02:44:19.770 –> 02:44:20.850
John English: let’s bounce around the room.

2058
02:44:22.230 –> 02:44:23.880
John English: And we’ll start with Ray.

2059
02:44:30.330 –> 02:44:31.680
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, I think you stop my video.

2060
02:44:32.340 –> 02:44:33.210
Started. Whoops.

2061
02:44:35.640 –> 02:44:35.910
John English: Start

2062
02:44:36.660 –> 02:44:41.400
Raymond Bonilla: Or if that was on purpose, and see you can start your video because the hostess stopped it.

2063
02:44:45.240 –> 02:44:49.830
Raymond Bonilla: See my dog DC is the first time with me on the stream and you know this is this

2064
02:44:50.610 –> 02:44:52.050
Raymond Bonilla: Is normal. This is normal.

2065
02:44:52.230 –> 02:44:54.540
John English: Okay, so let me figure out how to turn that back on.

2066
02:44:54.990 –> 02:44:57.690
John English: Okay, so what do you think under

2067
02:45:00.270 –> 02:45:00.810
John English: Boy, Timmy.

2068
02:45:01.320 –> 02:45:03.510
Bill Koeb: Are you kicked kicked re oh

2069
02:45:03.840 –> 02:45:04.230
Raymond Bonilla: No.

2070
02:45:04.260 –> 02:45:05.250
He says,

2071
02:45:07.650 –> 02:45:08.910
Montalvo Machado: It makes the spirits little

2072
02:45:08.910 –> 02:45:09.720
Bill Koeb: plan worked

2073
02:45:10.080 –> 02:45:11.100
John English: Okay, let me try this.

2074
02:45:11.130 –> 02:45:11.550
Yeah.

2075
02:45:12.720 –> 02:45:18.090
John English: Ramin. I’m going to go to more and says may coast. So I’m going to make make you a host

2076
02:45:18.600 –> 02:45:22.830
John English: Okay. Oh no, asked asked to start video start

2077
02:45:23.220 –> 02:45:26.100
Raymond Bonilla: Start my video. There you go. Okay.

2078
02:45:26.460 –> 02:45:27.930
John English: I was trying to spotlight you

2079
02:45:29.070 –> 02:45:30.210
John English: There right next to each other.

2080
02:45:32.370 –> 02:45:34.110
Raymond Bonilla: I make the same mistake, all the time.

2081
02:45:35.040 –> 02:45:36.300
John English: There you go. There you go.

2082
02:45:38.490 –> 02:45:40.860
John English: Through my cowboy. You had a little small. I need to work on.

2083
02:45:42.420 –> 02:45:44.550
Raymond Bonilla: I suck at cowboy hats. I

2084
02:45:50.100 –> 02:45:54.690
John English: Will go to Bill. There you go. Bill, Bill, did to we talk so long. He of

2085
02:45:54.690 –> 02:45:56.220
John English: Course he had to do to

2086
02:45:58.440 –> 02:46:03.930
Raymond Bonilla: posit that that’s not a good idea before that he was doing while while he was waiting for the other ones to dry. Right.

2087
02:46:05.070 –> 02:46:09.570
Bill Koeb: I started this one before the time and then this one just, just a quick one.

2088
02:46:11.190 –> 02:46:13.830
Bill Koeb: And then I did another quick thing too, so

2089
02:46:16.410 –> 02:46:17.370
Bill Koeb: That’s good john

2090
02:46:17.610 –> 02:46:17.880
No.

2091
02:46:18.930 –> 02:46:22.230
John English: Need some help, but it’s let’s go in the right direction.

2092
02:46:23.970 –> 02:46:28.170
John English: Okay, so let’s do this, let’s jump into Instagram real quick and go through a few Instagram.

2093
02:46:28.770 –> 02:46:29.400
Raymond Bonilla: Sounds good.

2094
02:46:30.000 –> 02:46:32.160
John English: Me, I’m gonna stop my video.

2095
02:46:34.890 –> 02:46:35.700
John English: My face time

2096
02:46:36.240 –> 02:46:38.250
Bill Koeb: I’m going to try to rejoin on my computer.

2097
02:46:39.900 –> 02:46:40.200
John English: All right.

2098
02:46:42.660 –> 02:46:43.590
John English: Did you draw them.

2099
02:46:44.460 –> 02:46:49.260
Montalvo Machado: No, no, I was working on the second screen here that is doing research.

2100
02:46:50.280 –> 02:46:53.040
Montalvo Machado: And listening to you all and watching you.

2101
02:46:53.100 –> 02:46:54.390
John English: You pay. Sorry about that.

2102
02:46:54.720 –> 02:46:56.070
Raymond Bonilla: He was actually doing work.

2103
02:46:58.410 –> 02:47:00.240
John English: I apologize for the conversation.

2104
02:47:03.450 –> 02:47:04.200
Montalvo Machado: I really enjoyed

2105
02:47:07.380 –> 02:47:13.140
Montalvo Machado: Join you tonight. But, you know, as I said, it’s just, you know, it dropped in a few hours ago.

2106
02:47:15.660 –> 02:47:16.110
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

2107
02:47:19.200 –> 02:47:20.190
Raymond Bonilla: The fast deadline.

2108
02:47:24.870 –> 02:47:26.040
John English: Okay, so

2109
02:47:27.210 –> 02:47:27.840
John English: Instagram.

2110
02:47:29.340 –> 02:47:29.760
John English: Here we go.

2111
02:47:31.710 –> 02:47:32.940
John English: Can we all see Instagram.

2112
02:47:33.150 –> 02:47:36.720
Raymond Bonilla: About. Yes. Yep, yep, loading. All right.

2113
02:47:36.990 –> 02:47:41.730
John English: Let it completely load, because if I go too fast, it will just scroll right into another document in mind.

2114
02:47:44.910 –> 02:47:45.540
John English: All right.

2115
02:47:47.790 –> 02:47:51.720
John English: Instagram. So these are so big. Do I have to open them all individually.

2116
02:47:52.350 –> 02:47:54.540
Raymond Bonilla: I think if you open. Yeah.

2117
02:47:54.960 –> 02:47:56.250
Raymond Bonilla: To click on them and then then

2118
02:47:56.880 –> 02:47:57.120
Yeah.

2119
02:47:58.260 –> 02:47:58.680
Raymond Bonilla: Okay.

2120
02:47:59.340 –> 02:48:00.750
John English: I was just saying, Should I

2121
02:48:01.560 –> 02:48:03.540
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, I’m sorry. I’m

2122
02:48:04.800 –> 02:48:06.150
John English: Already did so.

2123
02:48:08.970 –> 02:48:10.680
John English: We’re just going to click through them pretty quick.

2124
02:48:10.710 –> 02:48:11.430
Raymond Bonilla: Did it. Yeah.

2125
02:48:14.940 –> 02:48:15.630
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, that’s great.

2126
02:48:15.990 –> 02:48:16.830
John English: A lot of great stuff.

2127
02:48:16.950 –> 02:48:18.000
Bill Koeb: A lot. Oh, nice.

2128
02:48:18.180 –> 02:48:18.630
John English: I love that.

2129
02:48:18.960 –> 02:48:20.670
Bill Koeb: It’s so different, really nice.

2130
02:48:22.920 –> 02:48:23.760
These are fun.

2131
02:48:26.520 –> 02:48:27.570
Raymond Bonilla: Gary again.

2132
02:48:28.530 –> 02:48:29.820
Bill Koeb: Oh, nice one, Gary.

2133
02:48:30.690 –> 02:48:32.070
John English: Gary doesn’t know about the

2134
02:48:33.630 –> 02:48:36.630
John English: The list the secret list we have and we have

2135
02:48:36.660 –> 02:48:40.350
Raymond Bonilla: Gary. We’re not very happy with Gary, we never really are so

2136
02:48:41.460 –> 02:48:46.050
John English: I created a list at the illustration Academy of students that we’re going to potentially have to kill

2137
02:48:49.470 –> 02:48:51.180
John English: We’re going to defend our reputation and

2138
02:48:52.620 –> 02:48:53.640
Raymond Bonilla: Congratulations.

2139
02:48:55.350 –> 02:48:55.560
John English: My

2140
02:48:55.830 –> 02:48:57.450
John English: Little on that list, by the way.

2141
02:48:58.230 –> 02:49:00.810
Montalvo Machado: Yeah, but I was looking to be kind of far

2142
02:49:03.360 –> 02:49:07.140
John English: But there was a whole bunch of I mean Sterling and Tonto and Edward and

2143
02:49:08.190 –> 02:49:11.760
John English: Ashley love it all these great illustrators Francis fillet home from

2144
02:49:12.240 –> 02:49:17.850
John English: Oh yeah so Del Rey from the illustration Academy. Those are the mediocre ones. They’re really good ones. We got rid of

2145
02:49:21.030 –> 02:49:23.640
Bill Koeb: Basically anybody under 45

2146
02:49:25.800 –> 02:49:26.700
Bill Koeb: Is done for

2147
02:49:28.440 –> 02:49:32.130
John English: This is great stuff. I’m kidding. There’s those artists are also good. I

2148
02:49:33.270 –> 02:49:33.810
John English: Know,

2149
02:49:44.550 –> 02:49:45.120
John English: He’s one of those

2150
02:49:45.720 –> 02:49:46.770
Bill Koeb: Oh, that’s nice.

2151
02:49:47.130 –> 02:49:53.160
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, right. We need it. Yeah. You know why you should just click on the Report button for anything that’s too good, Jonathan.

2152
02:49:54.090 –> 02:49:55.620
John English: And he’s like, good.

2153
02:49:56.340 –> 02:49:56.550
Yeah.

2154
02:49:58.260 –> 02:49:59.400
John English: So much good stuff.

2155
02:50:00.660 –> 02:50:03.120
John English: That’s now this was a. That was a tough post

2156
02:50:03.480 –> 02:50:04.020
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

2157
02:50:04.530 –> 02:50:05.160
It was

2158
02:50:07.350 –> 02:50:08.160
John English: That’s where Berto

2159
02:50:10.650 –> 02:50:13.350
Raymond Bonilla: That’s really no owner of the Thomas black hair.

2160
02:50:13.650 –> 02:50:21.960
John English: Straight he owns the Thomas box here, and I don’t know if you got it yet. I just sent a he supposed to get it. I think tomorrow. It’s supposed to be delivered to them.

2161
02:50:23.280 –> 02:50:28.980
John English: And I’m not kidding. I actually, I sent him the I finally sent him the tracking number but I mailed on Monday.

2162
02:50:29.850 –> 02:50:30.630
Raymond Bonilla: That’s nice.

2163
02:50:30.720 –> 02:50:31.770
John English: Arena. Wow.

2164
02:50:32.310 –> 02:50:34.410
John English: Elena’s really good painter, she’s

2165
02:50:35.550 –> 02:50:36.960
John English: Really like what she’s been doing

2166
02:50:37.020 –> 02:50:37.590
Yeah.

2167
02:50:42.630 –> 02:50:43.290
Good, good.

2168
02:50:47.100 –> 02:50:48.780
Bill Koeb: Whoa, that’s cool.

2169
02:50:48.840 –> 02:50:50.460
Raymond Bonilla: Wow and stitching.

2170
02:50:52.230 –> 02:50:52.890
Raymond Bonilla: Wow.

2171
02:50:54.120 –> 02:50:54.690
Montalvo Machado: You fast.

2172
02:50:54.810 –> 02:50:55.410
Raymond Bonilla: How fast.

2173
02:50:55.560 –> 02:50:57.420
John English: This person. One is that

2174
02:50:57.870 –> 02:51:02.280
John English: Is that like several poses a time I’ll really nice.

2175
02:51:02.670 –> 02:51:04.650
Montalvo Machado: Wow, really impressive.

2176
02:51:06.150 –> 02:51:06.900
John English: That’s nice.

2177
02:51:08.310 –> 02:51:08.700
Bill Koeb: As

2178
02:51:11.820 –> 02:51:12.930
John English: Somebody just came in.

2179
02:51:13.770 –> 02:51:14.730
Bill Koeb: Oh, that’s a good one day.

2180
02:51:14.880 –> 02:51:16.830
John English: Me came back, I think, watch out.

2181
02:51:20.280 –> 02:51:22.260
Raymond Bonilla: Text. You gotta get back in there.

2182
02:51:24.540 –> 02:51:26.970
John English: Hold on, let me see who it was. It came in there and

2183
02:51:27.030 –> 02:51:29.220
Bill Koeb: I’m trying to come back in on my computer.

2184
02:51:29.310 –> 02:51:30.870
Raymond Bonilla: Okay, okay.

2185
02:51:32.760 –> 02:51:33.480
John English: Bill again.

2186
02:51:35.310 –> 02:51:36.030
John English: It’s nice.

2187
02:51:39.540 –> 02:51:44.640
John English: There’s something about this pose that less was more in that pool. Yes.

2188
02:51:45.060 –> 02:51:47.370
John English: Absolutely yes you did, the better off you were

2189
02:51:47.700 –> 02:51:48.390
Yeah.

2190
02:51:50.070 –> 02:51:52.230
John English: It’s good. This it that’s that’s a tough pose to

2191
02:51:52.260 –> 02:51:53.700
Raymond Bonilla: That was a tough posts, I

2192
02:51:54.150 –> 02:51:57.270
John English: Wow, this is good. Jesse and Jesse

2193
02:52:00.720 –> 02:52:01.920
John English: Is an Academy students

2194
02:52:04.680 –> 02:52:04.860
John English: Oh,

2195
02:52:05.190 –> 02:52:06.030
Raymond Bonilla: Wow, very

2196
02:52:06.420 –> 02:52:07.890
Nice other academies student

2197
02:52:09.000 –> 02:52:09.690
John English: Very nice.

2198
02:52:10.290 –> 02:52:12.480
Raymond Bonilla: Playing with heavy pain. I gotta check that out.

2199
02:52:12.510 –> 02:52:13.470
Bill Koeb: It’s really nice.

2200
02:52:14.160 –> 02:52:14.670
John English: Good one.

2201
02:52:14.940 –> 02:52:16.050
Raymond Bonilla: That’s really nice. Yeah.

2202
02:52:17.880 –> 02:52:20.670
John English: Caffeine Bradshaw, nice, nice.

2203
02:52:24.570 –> 02:52:25.410
John English: Julian again.

2204
02:52:26.130 –> 02:52:26.580
Cool.

2205
02:52:29.880 –> 02:52:31.380
Raymond Bonilla: As a braver colored man.

2206
02:52:32.130 –> 02:52:32.520
Yeah.

2207
02:52:33.630 –> 02:52:35.310
John English: I use brown and light brown

2208
02:52:39.570 –> 02:52:41.070
John English: Cool. I use warm grey.

2209
02:52:44.160 –> 02:52:44.880
John English: This is nice.

2210
02:52:48.240 –> 02:52:49.200
John English: This is really good.

2211
02:52:49.890 –> 02:52:52.980
John English: Yeah, nice, nice attitude to it. Yep.

2212
02:52:56.130 –> 02:52:56.730
John English: Another good one.

2213
02:52:56.970 –> 02:52:57.480
Oh, yeah.

2214
02:53:04.020 –> 02:53:05.040
Raymond Bonilla: I like that one, too.

2215
02:53:06.540 –> 02:53:07.110
John English: Good color.

2216
02:53:10.830 –> 02:53:11.280
Nice.

2217
02:53:14.100 –> 02:53:15.660
John English: Yeah, it’s different for editor.

2218
02:53:15.720 –> 02:53:16.440
Yeah.

2219
02:53:21.660 –> 02:53:22.200
Raymond Bonilla: Yep.

2220
02:53:25.980 –> 02:53:29.580
Raymond Bonilla: Come on, Doug. Alright. Hit that report. Where’s the report, but

2221
02:53:31.410 –> 02:53:34.410
John English: He’s on the hitless he just signed up for my portfolio class.

2222
02:53:34.890 –> 02:53:35.910
Raymond Bonilla: Well, you know,

2223
02:53:37.500 –> 02:53:38.010
John English: Why

2224
02:53:43.980 –> 02:53:45.900
John English: Teasing they’ll continue to teach you a lot.

2225
02:53:49.950 –> 02:53:51.660
Raymond Bonilla: That we’re not feeling well you might take it over the

2226
02:53:51.660 –> 02:53:52.020
Class.

2227
02:53:53.160 –> 02:53:54.720
Raymond Bonilla: While I go any finish.

2228
02:53:55.440 –> 02:53:57.330
John English: This is great. That’s a nice piece.

2229
02:53:58.470 –> 02:54:00.090
John English: Yeah, that’s really it is really getting

2230
02:54:00.090 –> 02:54:00.450
Good.

2231
02:54:03.300 –> 02:54:08.610
John English: She practices all the time. It’s no fair, that’s cool. That’s fun.

2232
02:54:14.640 –> 02:54:15.270
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

2233
02:54:15.540 –> 02:54:15.930
Wow.

2234
02:54:17.580 –> 02:54:17.880
John English: Nice.

2235
02:54:18.420 –> 02:54:20.700
Raymond Bonilla: People are sleeping color, man. This is great.

2236
02:54:21.570 –> 02:54:22.170
John English: Really good.

2237
02:54:25.650 –> 02:54:27.240
John English: That’s what I joke.

2238
02:54:27.840 –> 02:54:38.370
John English: I know I’ve said this to you before me. I’ve said this and I laugh every time I laugh at myself when I say it because I remember my dad. I was showing him Instagram for the first time.

2239
02:54:39.960 –> 02:54:50.910
John English: He he pretty much, you know, just locks onto my phone for like an hour just keeps going through stuff and he looks at me and because we’re doing all these good artists come from.

2240
02:54:56.790 –> 02:54:59.550
Raymond Bonilla: I feel like that every time I log on, it’s like

2241
02:55:00.780 –> 02:55:01.620
John English: This is there’s a lot more

2242
02:55:01.650 –> 02:55:02.760
Raymond Bonilla: I think you said that

2243
02:55:02.820 –> 02:55:05.190
John English: Like there’s a lot more good artists than there used to be.

2244
02:55:06.600 –> 02:55:08.310
Raymond Bonilla: Okay. People are pushing it was

2245
02:55:08.910 –> 02:55:09.240
Really

2246
02:55:11.940 –> 02:55:12.210
Raymond Bonilla: Great.

2247
02:55:12.840 –> 02:55:14.640
Bill Koeb: Oh man, that’s cool.

2248
02:55:14.910 –> 02:55:16.110
John English: Well that’s nice. Randy.

2249
02:55:18.900 –> 02:55:20.760
Raymond Bonilla: It’s hard to have ego. These days, right.

2250
02:55:20.970 –> 02:55:21.600
That’s right.

2251
02:55:22.710 –> 02:55:24.750
Raymond Bonilla: That’s a nice one. Yeah.

2252
02:55:25.050 –> 02:55:26.670
John English: really subtle. Yeah.

2253
02:55:30.240 –> 02:55:30.810
Raymond Bonilla: Nice.

2254
02:55:33.180 –> 02:55:34.200
Raymond Bonilla: Oh wow, that’s a nice

2255
02:55:35.070 –> 02:55:35.400
Yeah.

2256
02:55:37.770 –> 02:55:40.800
Raymond Bonilla: Everybody got that gesture down, man. It’s like killed it.

2257
02:55:44.250 –> 02:55:44.880
Raymond Bonilla: Nice.

2258
02:55:44.940 –> 02:55:46.500
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, it’s dug it. Got it, cool.

2259
02:55:55.380 –> 02:55:57.210
Raymond Bonilla: That’s interesting. I like that one, too.

2260
02:55:58.740 –> 02:55:59.370
John English: That’s nice.

2261
02:56:04.080 –> 02:56:04.890
Raymond Bonilla: That’s nice one.

2262
02:56:06.420 –> 02:56:07.050
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

2263
02:56:07.290 –> 02:56:09.630
Bill Koeb: Yo, there’s Addy, that’s great. One coffee.

2264
02:56:09.630 –> 02:56:11.520
Raymond Bonilla: Nice. Yeah.

2265
02:56:12.780 –> 02:56:15.060
Raymond Bonilla: We’re hovering close to the report, you know,

2266
02:56:17.370 –> 02:56:18.810
John English: Close to that list.

2267
02:56:18.990 –> 02:56:20.760
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, go through the list.

2268
02:56:25.290 –> 02:56:26.700
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, that’s cool. Yeah.

2269
02:56:28.800 –> 02:56:30.150
Raymond Bonilla: Someone I gotta try that out.

2270
02:56:35.760 –> 02:56:36.990
John English: Randy really

2271
02:56:39.570 –> 02:56:42.030
John English: Really made that paper Midtown works for you.

2272
02:56:42.390 –> 02:56:49.980
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, it’s got like an entire art, art stores with the supplies. Next time we switching up meetings every year.

2273
02:56:52.710 –> 02:56:53.610
Raymond Bonilla: I like that one.

2274
02:56:54.300 –> 02:56:55.320
Raymond Bonilla: It’s a palette knife.

2275
02:56:55.500 –> 02:56:55.890
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, yeah.

2276
02:56:56.250 –> 02:56:56.730
Raymond Bonilla: I found it.

2277
02:56:57.630 –> 02:57:00.090
John English: Very nice Jeremy’s good artist.

2278
02:57:00.210 –> 02:57:00.600
Yeah.

2279
02:57:02.190 –> 02:57:03.360
Bill Koeb: Nice attitude and that one.

2280
02:57:04.290 –> 02:57:04.920
John English: Good drawing

2281
02:57:10.950 –> 02:57:15.060
John English: I think I don’t know I think everybody’s getting better.

2282
02:57:18.510 –> 02:57:19.410
John English: This is last week.

2283
02:57:19.500 –> 02:57:20.370
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, that’s a

2284
02:57:23.010 –> 02:57:23.910
Bill Koeb: That’s a great one.

2285
02:57:24.750 –> 02:57:27.810
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, you can report that other one to john that’s probably a good idea.

2286
02:57:30.450 –> 02:57:31.320
Montalvo Machado: Please don’t kill him.

2287
02:57:31.710 –> 02:57:32.010
Yeah.

2288
02:57:35.520 –> 02:57:38.190
Bill Koeb: Thank you. Drawings hashtag. Please don’t kill me.

2289
02:57:38.310 –> 02:57:38.580
Yeah.

2290
02:57:40.830 –> 02:57:41.640
The list.

2291
02:57:42.750 –> 02:57:43.680
Raymond Bonilla: I’ve been added.

2292
02:57:43.920 –> 02:57:44.730
List.

2293
02:57:48.090 –> 02:57:51.090
John English: It’s taking its time loading I’m hope I’m loading the right thing.

2294
02:57:52.470 –> 02:57:53.280
John English: You’re gonna like it.

2295
02:57:53.640 –> 02:57:54.390
See y’all.

2296
02:58:00.990 –> 02:58:02.850
Raymond Bonilla: That’s a nice on that first one day. Wow.

2297
02:58:03.210 –> 02:58:03.930
John English: Yeah, I’m going to look at

2298
02:58:04.230 –> 02:58:05.970
Raymond Bonilla: A row is great. Yeah, this is

2299
02:58:06.000 –> 02:58:08.670
John English: Oh yeah. You mind if I look at them like this because I’m

2300
02:58:08.670 –> 02:58:09.450
Raymond Bonilla: Now, this is great.

2301
02:58:10.080 –> 02:58:11.070
Raymond Bonilla: To see all of the

2302
02:58:11.640 –> 02:58:12.600
Raymond Bonilla: All together, you know,

2303
02:58:12.750 –> 02:58:14.340
Raymond Bonilla: Look at that. Yeah.

2304
02:58:17.430 –> 02:58:19.620
John English: It’s like this digital things like people are like,

2305
02:58:20.850 –> 02:58:21.930
John English: It’s not going away.

2306
02:58:26.280 –> 02:58:27.570
John English: I think it’s gonna stick around.

2307
02:58:27.900 –> 02:58:28.560
Raymond Bonilla: And my

2308
02:58:29.970 –> 02:58:31.350
Bill Koeb: On the left of the girl.

2309
02:58:31.800 –> 02:58:32.520
Raymond Bonilla: Next, yeah.

2310
02:58:32.550 –> 02:58:34.050
Bill Koeb: Yeah, yeah, that’s

2311
02:58:34.080 –> 02:58:34.440
Great.

2312
02:58:35.550 –> 02:58:37.530
John English: He’s. This is a good way to look at these actually

2313
02:58:39.150 –> 02:58:41.760
John English: I know we’re cropping them greatly but

2314
02:58:44.460 –> 02:58:51.240
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah, like look at look at Doug’s, for instance, like that reads, just as well. They’re astronomy there it’s it does full screen, you know,

2315
02:58:51.660 –> 02:58:51.990
Yeah.

2316
02:58:54.270 –> 02:58:58.710
Raymond Bonilla: Wow, look at the Wow, those yellow ones low. Yeah, so

2317
02:58:58.740 –> 02:59:00.150
John English: I know Brian looks. I bet.

2318
02:59:00.210 –> 02:59:02.460
Bill Koeb: Yeah, he’s on the list.

2319
02:59:03.690 –> 02:59:05.310
John English: Let’s see. Let’s pull it up just in case.

2320
02:59:05.310 –> 02:59:05.730
It.

2321
02:59:07.650 –> 02:59:08.730
Raymond Bonilla: Would take taking names.

2322
02:59:08.790 –> 02:59:10.530
Raymond Bonilla: I got am okay

2323
02:59:10.710 –> 02:59:11.700
John English: We’re paying attention.

2324
02:59:11.880 –> 02:59:13.290
Raymond Bonilla: Or taking names.

2325
02:59:14.160 –> 02:59:15.900
John English: Okay, now how do I go back

2326
02:59:19.680 –> 02:59:23.460
John English: The process. If I go to home, or that will take me to my home.

2327
02:59:25.410 –> 02:59:27.750
Bill Koeb: Do you haven’t actually a little girl.

2328
02:59:28.200 –> 02:59:29.850
John English: Come back to illustration isolation.

2329
02:59:30.960 –> 02:59:32.790
John English: Now it’s still showing me full stuff.

2330
02:59:35.910 –> 02:59:37.590
John English: I’ll just scroll through we’ve seen

2331
02:59:43.050 –> 02:59:46.860
John English: This is this, this is a this is Instagram or fate. This is

2332
02:59:48.990 –> 02:59:53.190
Raymond Bonilla: Is that the yeah I guess it’s following the hashtag rather than the group.

2333
02:59:54.030 –> 02:59:57.150
John English: Yeah, that makes. Okay, so how do I do that.

2334
02:59:57.450 –> 03:00:00.060
Bill Koeb: You got you have to go to recent posts.

2335
03:00:00.240 –> 03:00:01.260
John English: Island. Just go to this.

2336
03:00:02.610 –> 03:00:03.150
John English: I’ll do it again.

2337
03:00:06.210 –> 03:00:06.870
Raymond Bonilla: We’re doing like

2338
03:00:07.230 –> 03:00:08.850
John English: I’m like that. What, what

2339
03:00:09.960 –> 03:00:16.590
John English: Commercial with the, the, the train the guy training the people like their father.

2340
03:00:17.940 –> 03:00:18.870
Raymond Bonilla: Yeah.

2341
03:00:21.090 –> 03:00:22.050
John English: I am that guy.

2342
03:00:22.470 –> 03:00:27.630
John English: Yeah, I need to be true. I love that commercial wow there’s look at this as a whole new set

2343
03:00:28.200 –> 03:00:29.640
Raymond Bonilla: Oh yeah, yeah, yeah.

2344
03:00:29.970 –> 03:00:31.770
Raymond Bonilla: Oh, nice. I love that.

2345
03:00:33.540 –> 03:00:35.430
John English: I think people posted since we started

2346
03:00:36.030 –> 03:00:36.810
Raymond Bonilla: Ah, OK.

2347
03:00:38.640 –> 03:00:39.720
John English: These are awesome.

2348
03:00:43.620 –> 03:00:45.060
John English: Because this is where we left off.

2349
03:00:45.690 –> 03:00:46.110
Right.

2350
03:00:48.150 –> 03:00:49.530
Raymond Bonilla: A definite some new ones here.

2351
03:00:50.430 –> 03:00:50.760
Yeah.

2352
03:00:51.930 –> 03:00:53.070
John English: We’re actually more people

2353
03:00:54.300 –> 03:00:56.220
Bill Koeb: Listening in there, it

2354
03:00:57.900 –> 03:00:59.100
Looks like it to the farm.

2355
03:01:00.630 –> 03:01:01.080
John English: Were

2356
03:01:01.500 –> 03:01:03.360
Raymond Bonilla: Not on the far far right.

2357
03:01:03.930 –> 03:01:06.390
John English: Oh, here. Yeah, that’s a full dusty dry. Yeah.

2358
03:01:07.830 –> 03:01:09.660
John English: I think I’m not going to click on it.

2359
03:01:11.820 –> 03:01:12.810
John English: down that road.

2360
03:01:15.690 –> 03:01:16.440
John English: That’s nice.

2361
03:01:16.500 –> 03:01:17.430
Raymond Bonilla: It’s a great

2362
03:01:17.850 –> 03:01:18.330
Look at that.

2363
03:01:23.250 –> 03:01:24.360
John English: So many good ones.

2364
03:01:24.810 –> 03:01:25.290
Yeah.

2365
03:01:26.940 –> 03:01:28.020
Raymond Bonilla: To on the left. Wow.

2366
03:01:28.320 –> 03:01:32.010
John English: This one. Yeah, it’s killer. So is this

2367
03:01:32.520 –> 03:01:35.010
John English: Yeah, simplicity of them’s great

2368
03:01:36.180 –> 03:01:36.480
Montalvo Machado: That’s

2369
03:01:39.270 –> 03:01:40.500
John English: That’s kind of be felicity.

2370
03:01:41.670 –> 03:01:43.050
John English: No one else draws that well.

2371
03:01:43.440 –> 03:01:45.270
Raymond Bonilla: No, no.

2372
03:01:45.450 –> 03:01:53.910
Montalvo Machado: It is. It’s funny things. It’s just, it’s like style. This just gets gets, you know, away from the reality.

2373
03:01:55.230 –> 03:01:55.680
Montalvo Machado: Nowadays,

2374
03:01:56.010 –> 03:01:56.760
John English: we screw up.

2375
03:01:57.930 –> 03:02:04.710
John English: The naive quality of children’s artwork. When we start telling them that. No, no, no, that the grass is green in the sky.

2376
03:02:07.020 –> 03:02:09.870
John English: Limitations, and soon as there’s limitations. It’s all over with.

2377
03:02:09.900 –> 03:02:10.800
Raymond Bonilla: The innocent right

2378
03:02:11.550 –> 03:02:12.390
Montalvo Machado: Why do we do

2379
03:02:13.020 –> 03:02:14.310
Raymond Bonilla: That we spend the rest of our lives.

2380
03:02:15.570 –> 03:02:19.320
Raymond Bonilla: Change radical back Jason it back like remember when I was actually

2381
03:02:19.500 –> 03:02:20.400
Raymond Bonilla: A real artist.

2382
03:02:20.760 –> 03:02:33.210
John English: Right, I got my dad compensated and compensated my artwork as I was learning, especially when I was a teenager and he would just take things he would never ask you just say

2383
03:02:36.060 –> 03:02:37.110
John English: Hey, I didn’t

2384
03:02:37.650 –> 03:02:38.130
Bill Koeb: Find

2385
03:02:38.430 –> 03:02:52.350
John English: The painting. Very first squash painting of a horse on a ride writing. I’m, you know, Indian on a horse, and he took it and they only said to me, as he took it. He goes, You will never do anything this good for the next 10 years

2386
03:02:55.350 –> 03:02:55.800
Bill Koeb: Or

2387
03:02:56.190 –> 03:02:58.200
John English: I just got an old back and he was

2388
03:03:02.250 –> 03:03:02.910
Was 30

2389
03:03:04.440 –> 03:03:04.950
Raymond Bonilla: Oh,

2390
03:03:05.610 –> 03:03:13.140
John English: Boy. Okay. Well, listen, everybody, we’re just, you’re just killing time. I just, I just wanted to thank everybody for joining us.

2391
03:03:14.490 –> 03:03:27.000
John English: Remember, we got a semester starting a week from Saturday. So if you have, if you have interest in in class in class reach out to us and Ray and Bill taco. Thank you so much for being here tonight.

2392
03:03:27.660 –> 03:03:29.550
Raymond Bonilla: Thanks. Thank you guys as

2393
03:03:29.550 –> 03:03:30.600
Raymond Bonilla: Always. It is an honor.

2394
03:03:30.600 –> 03:03:37.890
John English: So excellent hanging with you guys. As always, and in the crowd. Thanks so much for tolerating us. I hope you had fun drawing

2395
03:03:38.880 –> 03:03:40.080
Bill Koeb: Thanks, everybody, so many good

2396
03:03:40.080 –> 03:03:40.830
Raymond Bonilla: Thanks, everyone.

2397
03:03:41.130 –> 03:03:41.490
Thank you.

2398
03:03:42.510 –> 03:03:43.110
John English: Have a great day.

2399
03:03:44.130 –> 03:03:44.640
Take care.